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These posters wound up in my inbox (thanks, Ben!) and at first I thought they were satire on the healing powers of religion—God as a quack doc, Jesus as the most inept RN ever.

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And then I remembered my grandparents' neighbor, a retired farmer who found out he had lung cancer. He went to chemo a few times and then quit.

Turns out he conferred with God, who told him to drink "hay tea" (hot water with straw in it) and that would cure him. Six months later, the man claimed he was cured, though he never checked with a doc to confirm this.

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A few weeks later he was dead.


And while visiting religious pregnancy centers last week (which present themselves as "medical clinics"—even though most of them don't have docs or nurses on staff), I was repeatedly asked how an abortion would affect my relationship with God—and how would that, in turn, affect my mental and physical health. They gave me pamphlets that read, "What is God's desire for you in this situation? How does God see your unborn child?"

Hey! After abortions, maybe God could just prescribe women with "two caplets of clear conscience" and we could all move on with our lives!

My point is, seeing spirituality as an allegorical cure for what ails you is fine. But start substituting God for real medical care (or imposing him on others in lieu of real medical care) and, as you'll see below, you're doing nothing but playing games with your health and making God the target of a pretty hefty malpractice suit.

More medical advice from the Lord after the jump.

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