Life Support II by mad glass scientist Mark Zirpel. Dont just tell me what it is, tell me why youre showing it.
  • Life Support II by mad glass scientist Mark Zirpel. Don't just tell me what it is, tell me why you're showing it.
Cornish College of the Arts has a problem: It's insulated. You don't see its teachers at openings and talks. It functions like a closed universe. Cornish isn't the only art school with this problem; this is the classic art-school problem. And it's a problem Cable Griffith, the new curator of Cornish's gallery, hopes to help solve in his relatively small role.

Tonight is his coming-out party, and it looks promising. His first show, opening from 5 to 8 pm, is called Show and Tell: Objectivity, and it's not only an art display but also a performance: Faculty and staff will each talk about why they chose what they chose to display—testing notions of "objective" decision-making—to the assembled audience, starting at 5:30.

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The best part is the list of artists, from traditional representational painter Bo Bartlett to insect-reanimator Jim Rittiman, mad glass scientist Mark Zirpel, found-paper-embroiderer Marc Dombrosky, comic artist Eroyn Franklin, trekking-a-sculpture-up-a-mountain artist John Grade, punk-nerd-minimalist Vic Haven, performance sculptors SuttonBeresCuller, formal contraptionist W. Scott Trimble, and anthropomorphist extraordinaire Whiting Tennis.

Let's hear it for opening up the doors and letting in some damn air.