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I didn't address this Wall Street Journal piece about young adult fiction because I thought it was too painfully stupid to acknowledge:

How dark is contemporary fiction for teens? Darker than when you were a child, my dear: So dark that kidnapping and pederasty and incest and brutal beatings are now just part of the run of things in novels directed, broadly speaking, at children from the ages of 12 to 18.
...
If books show us the world, teen fiction can be like a hall of fun-house mirrors, constantly reflecting back hideously distorted portrayals of what life is. There are of course exceptions, but a careless young reader—or one who seeks out depravity—will find himself surrounded by images not of joy or beauty but of damage, brutality and losses of the most horrendous kinds.

Luckily, though, Stranger Genius of Literature (and bestselling young adult novelist) Sherman Alexie did respond to the piece. You should go read his very good essay. Here's a taste:

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Does Ms. Gurdon honestly believe that a sexually explicit YA novel might somehow traumatize a teen mother? Does she believe that a YA novel about murder and rape will somehow shock a teenager whose life has been damaged by murder and rape? Does she believe a dystopian novel will frighten a kid who already lives in hell?

It's one of the strongest cases for young adult literature I've ever read. Go read the whole thing.