The muse-model, as Mitchell calls them, is Anna Telcs, herself an artist/designer.
  • The muse-model, as Mitchell calls them, is Anna Telcs, herself an artist/designer.

From the Loose Lips column in the paper this week:

On Friday night, nine bodies were laid out on mirrors on the floor of the Frye Art Museum for the "processional"/opening of Mark Mitchell's Burial collection—a collection of clothes for the dead. "I just keep wondering what's going through their minds," Roq La Rue Gallery's Kirsten Anderson said, looking down at a waxy, still model. The models would occasionally jerk and twist with discomfort, their eyes remaining closed. It looked like they were having nightmares. Above them, the museum's old paintings were packed together on the walls. People were crying. The crowd eventually hit nearly 1,000, and people who hadn't RSVP'd had to be turned away. The haute funeral parlor was fraught in about a hundred ways. Someone said that in the presence of all this death, those old paintings never felt more alive. Transferred to mannequins, the clothing will be on display through October 20.

This was yesterday in the same room:

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The same clothing, now on standing mannequins rather than prone, eyes-shut, living people.
  • The same clothing, now on standing mannequins rather than prone, eyes-shut, living people.

I'll be writing more about both experiences soon. Visit it yourself. Info.