Spar Wilson, a graduate of the University of Washingtons bachelor in arts program in 2011, works like an inventor, building robotic machines that send colored light through layers of lenses and water onto the walls.
  • Courtesy of the artist
  • Spar Wilson, a graduate of the University of Washington's bachelor in arts program in 2011, works like an inventor, building robotic machines that send colored light through layers of lenses and water onto the walls.

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Have you been to Interstitial Theatre in its temporary home at the former three-story Ekberg's furniture building in Belltown yet? Here's what I wrote about the all-video collective when it opened in this fantastical temporary location in October—a location without heat and lights, so huge shows of video installations are brilliant there. IT will only be in the space, provided through Storefronts Seattle, for one more month, and tonight is the opening of its last show there, a group exhibition called Hydrosphere. I got a preview of it last night.

The works are (mostly) water/weather-based installations: a giant inflated weather balloon with distant bodies of water projected onto its bulbous, lightly swaying surface (Andy Behrle); videos shot looking down into a crystal chalice with champagne, menstrual blood, and breast milk in it, mounted on the walls of a claustrophobic pink sitting parlor (Kate Ryan, Saint Genet member); old 1950s soft-coreish "static films" mapped onto windows so it feels like you are eavesdropping from outside (Jon Womack); a wild tumble down the rabbit hole of Google image search (Flynn Casey).

On the very bottom floor, which feels like it's ten stories under the ground rather than just one, is a huge room that's empty except for a few scattered votive candles on the floor and a soundscape emitting from speakers, inspired by the Aurora Borealis. It's called Space Weather Listening Booth and it was inspired by Nat Evans and John Teske. (I first loved Space Weather Listening Booth here.) I can't stress how dark it is down there. It is an arcade of darkness. It is perfect for listening. On December 6, there will be a live performance down there, with a big shag rug spread out for lying on. I'd bring a pillow and sleeping bag, too.

The opening will feature live performances by Alice Gosti, and the team of Rashelle McKee and Alisa Popova.

The show was not entirely built when I saw it last night, so it's hard to say exactly what you'll see tonight. But there are at least a few strong, fascinating works by artists likely to be new to you, and the atmosphere is unbelievably urban-romantic and strange (wander into the back rooms and find the vanishing staircase). Admission is free. You cannot go wrong.

Maja Petric created this lightbox (this is a detail) using landscape photographs she took in Eastern Washington, stitching them into what feels like a tectonic panorama.
  • Courtesy of the artist
  • Maja Petric created this lightbox (this is a detail) using landscape photographs she took in Eastern Washington, stitching them into what feels like a tectonic panorama.