When informed that he said something intelligent, Carson apologized and vowed to be a better Republican in the future.
  • Christopher Halloran / Shutterstock.com
  • When informed that he said something intelligent, Carson apologized and vowed to be a better Republican in the future.

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BuzzFeed asked a number of presidential candidates how they feel about vaccinations. Most of them (purposefully?) left things unclear. Ben Carson, who has been the most erratic and uninformed candidate in the race so far, is one of the strongest supporters of vaccination, presumably because he is a brain surgeon who went to medical school. So on this one issue, and this one issue only, you should listen to Ben Carson. Meanwhile, Republican representative Mo Brooks from Alabama doesn't want to point the finger at anti-vaxxers for the measles outbreak. He thinks illegal immigrants might be causing it, instead: “It might be the enterovirus that has a heavy presence in Central and South America that has caused deaths of American children over the past 6 to 9 months,” he said. Brooks also said he feels bad that immigrant children “have not been blessed with the kind of health care, the kind of immunizations that we demand of our children in the United States.” Based on this evidence, I'm not sure Brooks knows what the word "demand" means, or that he could demonstrate even a basic grasp of current events in America.

UPDATE 2:36 PM: The New York Times reports that Rand Paul invited a reporter to watch him get his Hepatitis A booster shot. This is an attempt by Paul to put two terrible days behind him, but it doesn't answer any of the questions he was asked yesterday, nor does it settle Paul's long association with an anti-vaccine organization.