Mark one year of the Trumpian regime with the Seattle Women's March 2.0 on January 20. Jessica Stein

If you've made a New Year's resolution to stop watching so much Netflix and go out more instead, we've got you covered. We've rounded up 115 big food festivals, performances, art shows, concerts, and other good reasons to immerse yourself in Seattle's culture this month, no matter what the temperature is outside. Below, find everything from the Timbrrr! Winter Music Festival to National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward, from the closing of SAM's Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect exhibit to Adam Sandler & Friends, from the Taylor Shellfish Night Tide Oyster Soiree to Strawshop's production of Frost/Nixon, and from the Nordic Lights Film Festival to MLK Day events. If all of that isn't enough, you can also look ahead to the rest of this year's big events, or check out our complete Things To Do calendar.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.

JANUARY 5-11

READINGS & TALKS

1. David Sedaris "Workshop" Readings
The witty, self-deprecating, hilariously judgmental David Sedaris will return to Seattle to workshop his new manuscript, Calypso. His work will probably be polished and beautifully performed, with perfect timing and absurdly funny material. Feel lucky that he chose our town for the second year in a row, and help him out by being a responsive, honest audience.

JANUARY 5-13

PERFORMANCE

2. 14/48: The World's Quickest Theater Festival
True to its name, the 14/48 Festival turns around 14 brand-new, theme-based, 10-minute plays in two days. The high-pressure nature of the event produces an evening of surprising theater for the audience, who arrive in their seats charged with expectation and anxiety for the performers. Though there are always a few experiments that don't quite come together, it's endlessly fascinating to see the way one theme filters through the minds of several very different theater artists. Expect shit to get weird. RICH SMITH

JANUARY 6

MUSIC

3. Little Big Show #20: Pickwick, Porter Ray
The 20th edition of the “little show with a big effect” features one of my new favorite Seattle-area outfits, Pickwick, who push a super-heady blend of rock, garage, and R&B. Produced by Erik Blood, their 2017 sophomore full-length, Lovejoys, gets a 1970s vintage Shuggie Otis–flavored groove treatment, opening with the slinky bass lines and velvety, high-hitting vocals of “Turncoat.” Things turn even more greasy and gritty with the chugging, brass-farting funk of “Ascension,” and get into more straightforward trippy, organ-driven cuts like “Lying Awake in the Dark,” while Pickwick amp up the psychedelic soul on set-closer “Ammonia.” This is a benefit show for Urban ArtWorks, a nonprofit that provides underserved youth and modern artists with opportunities to create public works of art. LEILANI POLK

4. Mozart Symphony No. 39
After having been seemingly lost to the ravages of time, the phantom-like "Funeral Song" will triumphantly arrive in Seattle, after being rediscovered in Russia, as the cornerstone of this program, featuring Mozart's innovative 39th Symphony and Ligeti's Violin Concerto, illustrated by acclaimed violinist Augustin Hadelich.

JANUARY 7

READINGS & TALKS

5. Stephen Tobolowsky
You’ve seen Stephen Tobolowsky in films (Memento, Groundhog Day), and, if your radio dial has gotten anywhere near an NPR or PRI station in any North American city for more than 10 seconds in the past 10 years, you’re certain to recognize his deep, slow, hypnotic voice. Tobolowsky is justifiably celebrated for the strength of his discursive storytelling, which is fueled both by the narrator’s seeming bemusement with the events that befall him and by his unfailing capacity to deliver the kind of stunning, out-of-nowhere surprise details that make you wonder (A) how much is fiction, and (B) why things like this don’t happen to you. He will read from his latest book, My Adventures with God, which is about his quest for meaning and order in a haphazard life. SEAN NELSON

JANUARY 7-25

FOOD & DRINK

6. Shellfish Showcase
Shellfish Showcase is the seafood counterpart to Restaurant Week, organized by Dine Around Seattle. The organization has rounded up a host of restaurants to devise exclusive menus with four items highlighting fresh local shellfish, at least two of them entrées. Some notable participants include underground Pike Place trattoria Il Bistro, cozy Belltown wood-fired kitchen Orfeo, Fremont sushi bar Chiso, Sodo Korean steak house Girin Ssam Bar, Wallingford Japanese yakitori joint Yoroshiku, and Frank’s Oyster House in Ravenna, just to name a few. It’s a great opportunity to slurp some briny bivalves and scope out some hidden gems you wouldn’t otherwise try.

JANUARY 9

MUSIC

7. Nappy Roots, Northshore Band, B-Boy Fidget, DJ Indica Jones
Speaking as someone on the older end of the millennial spectrum, I was not aware that I grew up during Southern hiphop’s first renaissance. When I was in junior high and Pharrell first made waves as part of the Neptunes mixing beats for acts like Clipse, I wasn’t aware that they were the tip of the first Southern insurrection against NY and LA. I just knew I loved the “Grindin’” beat. Of those first Southern invasion records, Nappy Roots’ Watermelon, Chicken & Gritz perhaps has aged the best. The Kentucky outfit were always more conscious than their twerk-and-cocaine-happy counterparts, and still knew their way around an indelible hook (see: “Dime, Quarter, Nickel, Penny”). JOSEPH SCHAFER

READINGS & TALKS

8. Daniel Ellsberg with Daniel Bessner
Daniel Ellsberg is best known as the defense department analyst who leaked the Pentagon Papers to the New York Times, thus exposing the depth and duration of our government’s duplicity and culpability in all matters related to the Vietnam War. In facing massive criminal charges (espionage, treason, theft) for having released the highly classified study, he also enacted the now unimaginable scenario of a Republican performing an unselfish act for the good of the country. His new book, The Doomsday Machine, is full of similarly damning—and way more terrifying—information about America’s secret playbook for nuclear war. SEAN NELSON

JANUARY 9-10

MUSIC

9. Monty Alexander
Pianist Monty Alexander has spent five decades building and maintaining a reputation for bridging the worlds of American jazz, popular song, and the music of his home country of Jamaica. He'll be joined by JJ Shakur on bass and Jason Brown on drums.

JANUARY 10

MUSIC

10. Big Boi, the Cool Kids, Carter Wilson
Antwan Patton, aka Sir Lucious Left Foot, best known as Big Boi (BWAH) of the greatest muthafuckin’ rap group of all time, Outkast, straight outta East Point, the one and only ATLiens (as in the “ATL,” and if I catch you saying “at-liens” instead of “ey-tee-elly-ens,” I’ma laugh), has stayed consistent, snug in his lane while still willing to take risks, ever since he was forced to go for dolo (since his patna “went to do a little acting” almost 15 years ago now). Big Boi was part of something that relocated the creative heart of rap itself, and he remains, to a starched white tee, a professional rapper—this is his gat-damn job, and he takes it seriously. And while his raps only very occasionally veer into what could be called “workmanlike,” his totally unpretentious Dickies-suit-and-diamonds, your-pimp-uncle-wit-the-woodtips style makes him forever a People's Champ. LARRY MIZELL JR.

JANUARY 11

COMEDY

11. Solomon Georgio
Once a star on Seattle’s comedy circuit, Solomon Georgio moved to Los Angeles, as most aspiring comics must do to go supernova (it’s on page 3 of the manual), and the proud gay immigrant from Ethiopia has become a favorite of Conan O’Brien and other humor connoisseurs. Spinning countless threads of hilarity out of his unusual identity and circumstances, Georgio converts what could’ve been tiresome narcissism into reservoirs of deep laughter. For this show, he’ll be riding the irreverent high of his outstanding new album, Homonegro Superior. (Sample line: “Donald Trump looks like lactose intolerance turned into a person.”) DAVE SEGAL

MUSIC

12. G3: Joe Satriani, John Petrucci, Phil Collen
Joe Satriani staked out his claim in the shred guitar sweepstakes by surfing with the alien (an early album title) and going way out reverb-wise anyway, while still going way fast. He’s slowed down just a tad for his new one, What Happens Next, taking a more human, but still very rapid, perspective. Satriani’s wandering around under the stars instead of being out among them. Wondering who’s out there, and if anyone’s going to visit—questions already answered with his early concepts, but it’s good to get some ground work in. Fast! ANDREW HAMLIN

READINGS & TALKS

13. Around the Artifact: Inside the B-25 Bomber
The United States made almost 10,000 of these two-engine bombers over four decades. They were introduced in 1941 and made their mark in the Asian arena of World War II. The plane, which has guns sticking out the front and the back, the top and the sides, was considered to be very effective at sinking ships. Its sound and sight certainly terrified many sailors and also villagers. The gunner in the nose of a B-25 could turn whole boats or villages into cheese during a strafer attack. America made this plane. Violence and destruction are certainly a part of the nation’s history. This is something we liberals must never forget. The Flying Heritage Collection has a restoration of this plane, and this is your chance to tour it and learn about it.CHARLES MUDEDE

14. Constitutional Stress Test: Can the Democracy Survive the Current President?
Stranger crush WA Attorney General Bob Ferguson and former US Deputy Attorney General Bill Ruckelshaus will talk about the prospects for the American Constitution at this Seattle University of Public Service forum. Larry Hubbell and Joni Balter from SU will moderate. Maybe fill your Xanax prescription beforehand, or plan for some nice chamomile tea afterwards.

JANUARY 11-12

MUSIC

15. Spoon, White Reaper
On their early recordings, like 1998's A Series of Sneaks, Austin's Spoon tamed the sharp angles of post-punk into something less chilly and more warm-blooded. Since 2005's recently reissued Gimme Fiction, they've moved in a more soulful direction, like the Rolling Stones reborn as an Americana act with a Prince fixation. On their ninth album, Hot Thoughts—their first without acoustic guitar—Spoon bust out synths, hand claps, and electronic beats for a sinuous party record. If their fiery set at Bumbershoot 2017 is any indication, this two-night stand should confirm their status as one of America's great rock bands. KATHY FENNESSY

JANUARY 11-14

FESTIVALS

16. Nordic Lights Film Festival
The Nordic Heritage Museum will take you on a cinematic tour of Scandinavia with films from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and even the Faroe Islands. The lineup includes Borg vs. McEnroe (starring Shia Labeouf, about the famous tennis match), The Day Will Come (about two brothers rebelling against the cruel headmaster of a boys' home), Reykjavík (a "bittersweet romantic drama"), the Sami rap doc Arctic Superstar, and the Golden Globe-nominated The Square.

JANUARY 11-28

ART

17. Ghost Gallery Celebratory Group Show
For the past seven (almost eight) years, Laurie Kearney has run a brick-and-mortar gallery and shop in a charming space on Capitol Hill. In addition to solo shows, Kearney organized themed exhibitions with themes like bell jars, the tarot, and mini art. Alas, now Ghost's tenure is is drawing to a close, but not without a last-hurrah retrospective. The gallery will bring back some of the most interesting artists-about-town for this celebration: Stasia Burrington, Levi Hastings (who's illustrated for The Stranger), Andie DeRoux, Yoona Lee, Michael Alm, and others. The shop will relocate in the spring of this year, but when Ghost Gallery goes, Capitol Hill will get a little less interesting. Pay your respects and shop art, cards, décor, and jewelry from their backstock.

JANUARY 11-31

ART

18. Jessica Rycheal and Zorn B. Taylor: Everyday Black
Jessica Rycheal is a portrait photographer whose work documents subjects drawn from Seattle's multigenerational activist community with a sensuous, effervescent joie de vivre. Also a portrait photographer, Zorn B.Taylor often spotlights the idea of intentionally chosen family, capturing his subjects with simultaneous attention toward the monumental and the quotidian. In this two-person exhibition, curated by C. Davida Ingram and Leilani Lewis, Rycheal and Taylor present a series of intimate, honest, and lovingly created photographs celebrating many prominent members of Seattle's Black creative community. EMILY POTHAST

JANUARY 11-MARCH 8

FILM

19. Winter Light: The Films of Ingmar Bergman
I know. It’s Ingmar Bergman. I know, most of his films are very slow. I know, you want to see lots of action and explosions and all of that sort of thing. I know, I know, I know. But you must still watch Bergman's films. Look at it this way: A film like The Commuter, which must not be missed, is your fat-rich steak, and a movie like Bergman’s Through the Glass Darkly or Silence or Persona is your broccoli. You just can’t eat steak all of the time. You will die from just eating steak. You need your veggies. You can almost live forever on a diet of just films of the great Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. CHARLES MUDEDE

JANUARY 12

MUSIC

20. Keola Beamer and Henry Kapono
Legendary Hawaiian musicians Keola Beamer and Henry Kapono came to prominence in the '70s as banner-wavers for the modern age of island music traditions. They'll play tracks from the last four decades of their illustrious careers.

21. Railroad Earth
Long-gigging Americana band Railroad Earth will return for an evening of acoustic folk jam classics.

PERFORMANCE

22. Golden Dragon Acrobats
Get ready to be very, very impressed with China's Drama Desk Award-nominated Golden Dragon Acrobats Circus, which plays an amazing 200 shows a year and has been touring America for over 30 years. The troupe will soar through the air and perform feats of contortion.

JANUARY 12-13

PERFORMANCE

23. Giselle Deconstruct
Veronica Lee-Baik and her dance company, the Three Yells, are back with a remount of Giselle Deconstruct, a choreographic deconstruction and retelling of the renowned (and famously weird) ballet Giselle. The company chucks most of the first act and focuses on the lives of the Willies, which are the sylvan fairies who dance men to death in the second act. The show combines rib-cage-shattering industrial music with striking visuals and expressive, modern movement to tell a story about women who grow up in an environment where they have to fight everything all the time and rely on each other for strength and guidance. Sounds about right. Lee-Baik recently won a James W. Ray Venture Project Award for "A Crack in the Noise," so look for that in the future, too. RICH SMITH

JANUARY 12-14

COMEDY

24. James Davis: Hood Adjacent Comedy Tour
"Hood Adjacent" comic James Davis made comedy out of his attempts to get a "hood pass" despite being a Pomona College English major. Now, hear his verbal wit, perhaps about being a "professional token black friend."

MUSIC

25. Broadway Today
Take a look at how the high-kicks of the past led to the Broadway of today with showstopping performances of hits from The Book of Mormon, Honeymoon in Vegas, Cabaret, Company, Little Shop of Horrors, Nine, and more, thanks to the Seattle Symphony and Steven Reineke, Betsy Wolfe, and Jeremy Jordan.

JANUARY 12-29

PERFORMANCE

26. Straight White Men
In Washington Ensemble Theatre's Northwest debut of this family drama about three brothers mulling over their varying degrees of success during a Christmas vacation, Young Jean Lee holds whiteness and straightness and maleness up to the light for a proper examination that's long overdue. Something tells me that director Sara Porkalob, who has written extensively on the issue, is going to have a lot of fun with this one. Though there's plenty of fodder for her, theater critic Charles Isherwood says the play "goes far beyond cheap satire, ultimately becoming a compassionate and stimulating exploration of one man’s existential crisis." RICH SMITH

JANUARY 12-31

PERFORMANCE

27. Two Trains Running
Everyone should be well aware of Fences, August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece about black family life in the 1950s. But everyone—especially Seattleites concerned with issues of gentrification, activism, rising racial tensions, and economic inequality—would also do well to spend as much time thinking about Two Trains Running, the next in Wilson's 10-play cycle. Set in a Pittsburgh diner, Wilson reckons with the revolutionary decade of the 1960s, when expectations for the future of the civil rights movement were as high as they were uncertain. Everyone should also know that Wilson's a hometown hero, having spent the latter years of his life writing in the Victrola on 15th or the (old) Canterbury on 19th. Seeing his plays at the Rep, where his cycle of plays was produced in full, carries a special resonance. Juliette Carrillo will direct. RICH SMITH

JANUARY 13

COMEDY

28. Ryan Hamilton
Idahoan Ryan Hamilton, his enormous smile, and his gentle burring voice are coming to charm Seattle. Check out why Rolling Stone named this Great American Comedy Festival winner one of five comics to watch.

MUSIC

29. Takács String Quartet with Erika Eckert
Tonight, UW’s World Music series will present the Colorado-by-way-of-Hungary Takács String Quartet, an internationally acclaimed foursome who’ll run through three swooping compositions, including Mozart's String Quartet in D Major, K. 575, Carl Vine's String Quartet No. 6, "Child's Play," and Mendelssohn's String Quintet No. 2 in B-fl at Major, Op. 87.

30. Wolf Parade, Charly Bliss
The Montreal art-rock band that’s not Arcade Fire (but has some early ties to it), Wolf Parade had a well-regarded, Polaris-nominated debut in 2005’s Apologies to the Queen Mary (which introduced Spencer Krug’s wildly dramatic and idiosyncratic vocals in the roiling, synth-driven “I’ll Believe in Anything”), and then followed it with two more solid LPs before taking a hiatus in 2011. Wolf Parade returned in 2016 and dropped a fourth studio album last year, Cry Cry Cry, which has definite David Bowie appeal but is starker, darker, and more post-punk groove-oriented than past efforts. Openers Charly Bliss are a New York City outfit with power-pop tendencies and a frontwoman whose vocals are so sweet, they damn near hurt the teeth. LEILANI POLK

PERFORMANCE

31. Markiplier
YouTube star Mark Edward Fischbach, aka Markiplier, has captured the hearts and minds of the teenagers in our lives, mainly by recording vlogs and commentary on video games. He'll come to Seattle on his You're Welcome tour.

READINGS & TALKS

32. Jane Elliott
You may know Jane Elliott as the first person to conduct the horrifying Brown Eyes/Blue Eyes experiment, which, on the day after Martin Luther King, Jr.'s murder, showed how easily children can be induced to self-segregate and discriminate. Elliott has continued her educational activities as a feminist, LGBTQ, and anti-racist activist. She'll host a screening of I Am Not Your Negro, then moderate a discussion on institutionalized prejudice.

JANUARY 13-14

FESTIVALS

33. Bavarian Icefest
It's a holiday tradition for Leavenworth to transform into a Bavarian winter wonderland replete with snow sculptures, a snowmobile sled-pull, live ice carving, and many more frosty activities.

JANUARY 13-25

PERFORMANCE

34. Susanna's Secret: A BDSM Opera
Mount Analogue and Operamuse will present an opera that will get you hot under the collar, Susanna's Secret, starring Samantha Gorham and Darrell Jordan of Seattle Opera. Susanna is a kinky woman with a clueless husband who must take her pleasure with a mute butler. The costumes are created by quirky locals Mary Anne Carter and Colleen Louise Barry; the set and garments will be available to see in the gallery from Thursday through Sunday for the duration of the opera's run. Let this be your first, spicy taste of contemporary opera.

JANUARY 13-27

PERFORMANCE

35. Così fan tutte
Seattle Opera will perform Mozart's Così fan tutte, an Italian-language opera about fiancée swapping—roughly translated, the opera's title is "Women are like that." This production about the nature of faith and trust in relationships has regaled audiences for over two centuries with its bawdy, quirky style of comedy.

CLOSING JANUARY 14

ART

36. Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect
Born in Pennsylvania 100 years ago, Andrew Wyeth is an American realist painter associated with regionalism. His paintings and drawings generally include figures—sometimes in a landscape, sometimes in contemplatively lit interiors—that simultaneously present drama and stillness. In the 1970s and ’80s, he painted more than 247 studies of a German-born woman named Helga Testorf, resulting in some of the most intimate and compelling examples of 20th-century portraiture. Organized in partnership with the Brandywine River Museum, Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect presents more than 100 works by this quintessential American artist. EMILY POTHAST

FESTIVALS

37. Lantern Light Festival
Celebrate a 2,000-year-old Chinese tradition by seeing authentic lanterns of various shapes, sizes, and colors set aglow.

PERFORMANCE

38. The Book of Mormon
As human civilization rapidly approaches the end times, some of us need entertainment that skewers religion just to keep from going crazy. One deceptive, brilliant thing about The Book of Mormon is that the show unexpectedly ends up being okay with religion in the end—so long as you’re using your religious beliefs to make the world better. Plus, there are unbelievably funny tap numbers (“Turn It Off”), parodies of pop-culture juggernauts like Star Wars and The Lion King, and lines like “I can’t believe Jesus just called me a dick!” CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

JANUARY 15

FOOD & DRINK

39. Schmaltzy's Delicatessen Pop Up
At this pop-up precursor to the much-anticipated Jewish deli from Jonathan Silverberg of Napkin Friends opening in Ballard next year, you can pile your plate high at the buffet. Your ticket comes with one beer from Stoup Brewing or a nonalcoholic beverage.

MLK DAY

40. 2018 MLK Seattle Celebration
This annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration includes an opportunity fair, workshops, a rally and a march, ending with a shared meal back at Garfield High School.

PERFORMANCE

41. Stuff You Should Know
The Stuff You Should Know podcast explains how things work, from global warming to giraffes to personalized medicine to restaurant inspections. Check them out if you want a general introduction to...stuff.

JANUARY 16

READINGS & TALKS

42. Shawn Wen
Shawn Wen has mastered numerous media trades: You may have read her work in The New Inquiry, Seneca Review, Iowa Review, White Review, or City by City: Dispatches from the American Metropolis or heard her on This American Life, Freakonomics Radio or Marketplace. She's also a media artist who has shown work at the Museum of Modern Art, among other institutions. She'll speak about her book Twenty Minutes of Silence Followed By Applause, all about the famous mime Marcel Marceau. From the Washington Post's review: "Wen offers an invigorating and memorable paean to Marceau’s talent and tragedies, wrapped in a melodic critique that is unafraid to show the pain of an artist who sometimes felt trapped in a box" (get it?).

43. Sherman Alexie Loves: Nikki Giovanni
One of the most distinctive voices in the Black Power movement, poet/activist Nikki Giovanni transferred her linguistic potency and charisma to several soul-/gospel-oriented recordings as well as to stages and demonstrations. A precursor to rap, the Knoxville-born writer’s galvanizing, self-mythologizing funk classic “Ego Tripping” appeared on Soul Jazz’s stunning Fly Girls! compilation. Giovanni’s Afrocentric perspectives on race, gender, social justice, and sexuality continue to resonate today, and her smooth, mesmerizing delivery makes her performances riveting. Her new book, A Good Cry, is described as an autobiography in verse, detailing how Giovanni persevered through her parents’ violent marriage and exploring the pros and cons of aging. DAVE SEGAL

JANUARY 17

MUSIC

44. The Secret Sisters, Smooth Hound Smith
Anything involving Alabama has been a nightmarish wildfire of late, with clownish politicians, religious hubris, and an outpouring of negativity toward the Midwest and South. So I guess it needs to be said that beauty can still be unearthed in that region. Some of that beauty is courtesy of the Secret Sisters, a literal sister duo who have been concocting a sound that is what happens when First Aid Kit grow up on the banks of Muscle Shoals. The Secret Sisters coax their reedy alto voices into ruby dawn harmonies, imbued with the warmest of sentimental energies. Despite their name, there’s no actual mystery with Secret Sisters—they clearly developed their vocal tone in their hometown church as children and sanded it till smooth in adulthood. But considering that this country’s been hurtling downward since its inception, it feels real nice to listen to a simple yet classically beautiful gem like the Secret Sisters, a gem brought to clarity in America’s heartland. KIM SELLING

READINGS & TALKS

45. Jesmyn Ward
Jesmyn Ward won the National Book Award in 2011 for Salvage the Bones, and then she won it again this year for her latest work, Sing, Unburied, Sing. On top of that, this year the MacArthur Foundation called her a genius and gave her a bunch of money to keep writing more award-winning books. They describe her prose as "simultaneously luminous and achingly honest," capable of capturing "moments of beauty, tenderness, and resilience against a bleak landscape of crushing poverty, racism, addiction, and incarceration." RICH SMITH

46. Leni Zumas
Leni Zumas's third book of fiction, a dystopian, feminist fiction entitled Red Clocks, comes with many recommendations from reviewers—Ploughshares called it "Nothing short of a miracle," and local writer Lidia Yuknavitch wrote: "The bodies of women in Red Clocks are each the site of resistance and revolution. I screamed out loud. I pumped my first in the air. And I remembered how hope is forged from the ground up, through the bodies of women who won't be buried."

JANUARY 18

MUSIC

47. Itzhak Perlman
Grammy- and Emmy-winning violin virtuoso Itzhak Perlman, who's played a concert at the White House to honor Queen Elizabeth II and who received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, will perform an evening set.

48. Nacho Picasso, Guests
There are two—nay, three—things I love about Nacho Picasso. One, you can tell from his sometimes funny, sometimes perverse (sometimes both at once) rhymes that dude gives zero fucks. Two, he blithely raps about cocaine and other vices, providing an antidote to Seattle's sometimes squeaky-clean rap scene. Three, every time I hear that name, I picture Picasso eating nachos. AMBER CORTES

READINGS & TALKS

49. Carmen Maria Machado
Every year, without exception, the book world agrees to like one book and to get all buzzy about it on social media and in the newspapers. This year that book was Carmen Maria Machado's debut collection of magical realist short fiction, Her Body and Other Parties (Graywolf Press), which is composed of eight fables about "women on the verge," according to Parul Sehgal in the New York Times. Ellie Robins at the LA Times says the book is "an example of almost preposterous talent that also encapsulates something vital but previously diffuse about the moment." Annalisa Quinn at NPR says "Machado's stories describe "familiar, unspoken truths about being women in the world that more straightforward or realist writing wouldn't." Sounds like this book is the perfect mix of political allegory and escapist lit for our post-Weinstein, post-Hillary (maybe?) world. RICH SMITH

JANUARY 18-19

MUSIC

50. Prokofiev Concerto Festival 1 & 2
In this two-day Prokofiev love fest, Seattle Symphony will take you through the musical life of the great Russian composer. Fittingly, the Symphony invites the extremely young (he's 15), extremely talented (he won First Prize in the 2016 Young Concert Artists International Audition), and extremely local (he lives outside of Seattle) Nathan Lee to play the first (and shortest) piano concerto Prokofiev ever wrote. The next day you can catch the younger (she's 12) but equally talented Yesong Sophie Lee soloing Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 2. The highly celebrated pianist Charlie Albright and virtuoso violist William Hagen add some heft to the roster. One of my favorite violin parts happens on day one in Violin Concerto No. 1, but Prokofiev's "Classical" Symphony on day two is worth seeing, too, so I guess you'll just have to go both days. RICH SMITH

51. St. Vincent
The music of St. Vincent (legal name: Annie Clark) has always felt to me chilly, precise, nearly academic: she and David Byrne made perfect sense as cerebral foils for each other on their good-not-great collaborative album, Love This Giant from 2012. However, with her 2014-released self-titled album, St. Vincent's turned a stylistic corner, both musically and lyrically. Her once-cryptic missives now read like diary entries about a particularly obtuse crush from your sculpture class; meanwhile, her wily guitar work and frazzled electronics build instrumental backdrops that sound alternately tempestuous and Zen-like. Live, her normally unimpeachable poise gives way to dizzying solos, as Clark allows her feather-light voice to rip itself open above the fray. KYLE FLECK

JANUARY 18-20

COMEDY

52. Gary Owen
Gary Owen (Think Like A Man Too, Think Like A Man, Daddy Day Care) has been called "Funniest Serviceman in America" and "Black America's Favorite White Comic." See why this weekend.

PERFORMANCE

53. Chasm
This country (not to mention this city) has always been divided, but the recent polarization of politics combined with the popularization of punditry makes the task of even splitting a sandwich with someone who doesn't think like you do feel impossible. The newly formed GRIEF GIRLS--a diverse dance outfit that includes Markeith Wiley, Chelsey Weber-Smith, Julia Sloane, Lillian Orrey, Erin McCarthy, Hanna Hofmann, and Matt Aguayo--will explore the increasingly wide chasm that divides us with this fresh modern dance piece inspired by James Baldwin's inimitable play, Blues for Mister Charlie, which was itself inspired by the tragic death of Emmett Till. Laura Aschoff directs, and the dancers will lead a dialogue with the audience following the performance. RICH SMITH

JANUARY 18-21

MUSIC

54. War
LA funk/soul ensemble War have split into two camps: One goes by the name the Lowrider Band while original lead singer and keyboardist Lonnie Jordan has retained the War moniker. It’s not an optimal state of affairs, but War’s hit-laden ’70s catalog is so potent and redolent of greasily groovy good times and carefree summers (except for the ominous “Four Cornered Room,” which I consider one of War’s peaks) that you can be assured no matter which unit’s playing them, they’re going to transport you to a better, warmer place. So, great timing for War to do a four-night run in mid-January. DAVE SEGAL

PERFORMANCE

55. Forced Entertainment
This experimental theater company based in the UK has been in operation since 1984, and their shit looks ~extremely~ British. Lots of dry, dark humor about the inability to change. Strange durational pieces. Lots of anti-climaxes. Oddly deployed nudity. "We’re interested in confusion as well as laughter," they say. For the first two nights, they'll perform Real Magic, which is structured like a weird game show wherein participants "endlessly revisit moments of defeat, hope and anticipation." They'll end with Tomorrow’s Parties, a fairground kaleidoscope of many possible scenarios of the future of civilization, on the last night.RICH SMITH

JANUARY 18-27

PERFORMANCE

56. Frost/Nixon
There are about 27 reasons to see Strawshop's all-female production of Peter Morgan's classic play about the disgraced President reflecting on the Watergate scandal for the first time on television, and Stranger Genius Amy Thone playing Nixon is like 14 of those reasons. Alexandra Tavares grilling Thone/Nixon as the ever-intrepid Sir David Frost is about 10 of those reasons. The other three have to do with the fact that Trump would never be, in any kind of hell, least of all this one, as forthcoming, as deviously charming, and as disarmingly honest as Nixon was in this absorbing and infinitely fascinating interview. RICH SMITH

JANUARY 18-31

FESTIVALS

57. Seattle Celebrates Shakespeare
The disgruntled home of Amazon pays tribute to the beloved Bard of Avon in this season of theater, dance, and music. The festival begins this month with Seattle Shakespeare's Timon of Athens and ArtsWest's Peerless.

JANUARY 19

MUSIC

58. K.Flay, Sir Sly
K.Flay's new album, Crush Me, reveals both her hiphop background and her DIY punk sensibilities. Hear her perform live with Sir Sly.

59. Peanut Butter Wolf, DJ Swervewon, Supreme La Rock
This one isn’t just for the heads, but all hiphop fans alike (though the Yachty faithful might not show up, sorry). Peanut Butter Wolf has been an instrumental figure in West Coast underground hiphop for more than 25 years. And though he’s certainly had his ups and downs—releasing some of the best albums by Dilla, Madlib, and MF Doom on his legendary Stones Throw imprint; losing his best friend and musical partner Charizma at a young age—he seems to only get better and stronger with age. So if you’re in the mood to listen to some real underground hiphop, you truly can’t get much better than a set by the Wolf. NICK ZURKO

60. Tritonal, Sj, BRKLYN, Apek
Sleeper success Tritonal have been coasting on the popularity of their 2016 single "Blackout." They'll play a set of pop-heavy, melodic electronica with support from Sj, BRKLYN, and Apek.

JANUARY 19-27

PERFORMANCE

61. Configurate
Whim W'him will please your eyes with three world premieres by New York choreographer and Princess Grace Award-winner Gabrielle Lamb, the Switzerland-based Sadler's Wells Global Dance Contest laureate Ihsan Rustem, and Whim W’Him's own founder Olivier Wevers.

JANUARY 19-28

MUSIC

62. Seattle Chamber Music Society Winter Festival
The Seattle Chamber Music Society will present its winter season program with a two-weekend festival of six concerts flanked by free pre-concert recitals. Twenty acclaimed musicians are featured this year, including internationally renowned soloists, principals with major US orchestras, and top competition winners.

PERFORMANCE

63. Ghost Quartet
Though the phrase " a song cycle about love, death, and whiskey” might not inspire you to sprint to the boxoffice, this particular song cycle comes from the mind of Dave Malloy, who also created one of the most original and musically Broadway musicals of recent (or, indeed, distant) memory, Natasha, Pierre, and The Great Comet of 1812—a show which, by the way, began its life in a similar fashion to this one. Ghost Quartet draws on musical sources as diverse as murder ballads, doo-wop, jazz, and campfire drinking songs, with a narrative inspired by the likes of Edgar Allan Poe, James Joyce, Thelonious Monk, and Stanley Kubrick. In other words, if you have an affinity for any of the dark undercurrents rushing through the past two centuries of American, British, or Irish culture, there’s an excellent chance you’ll find something to embrace in Ghost Quartet. SEAN NELSON

JANUARY 20

ART

64. Lusio Lights
Take in the rare tropical plant life of the Volunteer Park Conservatory surrounded by light installations by Lusio light artists at this series of after-hours fundraising events. Stop into the Bromeliad House bar to grab a drink to take with you while you wander, or head to the Seasonal House to dance among the ferns.

COMEDY

65. The Comedy Get Down
Cedric "The Entertainer," Eddie Griffin, D.L. Hughley, and George Lopez will unite for an evening of big-name comedy.

66. Lewis Black
The old, white, alpha-male ranter is a familiar figure in comedy, stated Captain Obvious. But Lewis Black might be the paragon of this tradition, perhaps the last such über-curmudgeon we’ll ever need (although probably not, seeing as how the world’s going). Looking like a more brutish Al Franken, Black bellows in a baritone a litany of insults and outrages to his sensibilities. From the most minuscule mundanities to the horror show of politics to the most cosmic injustices, Black pinpoints their infuriating truths—laced with a powerful arsenal of profanity. Incredible catharsis ensues. DAVE SEGAL

67. Steven Wright
To keep audience members gripping their sides with laughter merely by deadpanning terse absurdities and dispensing hilariously improbable scenarios in one or two lines is genius. Poker-faced and bearing a ridiculous hairline, Wright is the master of succinct surrealism and once-in-a-millennium ideas. Even the way he says “thanks” will kill you. I remember bits like “The ice-cream truck in my neighborhood plays ‘Helter Skelter’” and “I was cesarean born, but you can’t tell. Although, whenever I leave the house, I go out the window,” as if it they were hit singles from my misspent youth. Wright is a hero for monotone-voiced wise guys worldwide. DAVE SEGAL

MUSIC

68. Vince Neil
Legendary Mötley Crüe frontman and singer Vince Neil will share a generation of iconic rock and metal songs like "Girls, Girls, Girls," "Dr. Feelgood," and "Kickstart My Heart."

PERFORMANCE

69. Safe & Legal: Celebrating 45 Years of Abortion Access
The loud and rowdy feminists at #ShoutYourAbortion are teaming up with Planned Parenthood to throw a party in celebration of Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court decision that gave women the right to choose what to do with their bodies. To celebrate the hard-won (and ongoing) battle, they've gathered a tremendous group of entertainers. Your host will be comedian El Sanchez (the very funny MC of "QTPOC-centered comedy/variety show" Fist & Shout!). The Shanghai Pearl will dazzle with humorous burlesque, Taqueet$ will pop and lock, Poppy Liu (founder of the storytelling group Collective Sex) will read poems about abortion, DJ J-Nasty will spin, Kelly O is running the photo booth, and Abigail Echo-Hawk, chief research officer for the Seattle Indian Health Board, will speak on the issue of women's health. RICH SMITH

RESISTANCE & SOLIDARITY

70. Seattle Women's March 2.0 - 2018
Mark one year of the Trumpian regime with a feminist, pro-LGBTQ, pro-POC gathering.

JANUARY 20-21

RESISTANCE & SOLIDARITY

71. Power to the Polls: Anniversary of the Womxn's March on Seattle
Seattle Womxn Marching Forward will launch a voting registration drive on the anniversary of the first Womxn's March (which they organized) and as part of a weekend of activism, panels, discussion, and more. Help them help Washington State improve on its 37% voter turnout this past November. The event continues the next day as Womxn Act on Seattle.

JANUARY 21

MUSIC

72. BØRNS
Michigan electro-pop singer-songwriter BØRNS is no stranger to selling out venues across the country. Riding the wave of success since the release of his debut album Dopamine in 2015, BØRNS will play tracks from that album as well as new material at his tour stop in Seattle.

73. Ladysmith Black Mambazo
Ladysmith Black Mambazo have a whole bunch of guys singing bass. That’s the secret to their success. Okay, Paul Simon “found” them, and that’s been the secret to their success in what we loosely term “the West.” By 1986, though, when Ladysmith Black Mambazo recorded and performed with Simon, they already had more than 20 albums in their native South Africa. Now they have more than 50 albums. They never stop touring, and they’ve outlasted the racist apartheid system under which the older members grew up. They’re still ambassadors to South African culture. And they make people happy—boldly, unironically, and enthusiastically. I just finished hearing more terrible news about you-know-who, ugh. We need happy like we need fucking food and air right now. Respect. ANDREW HAMLIN

JANUARY 22

COMEDY

74. Adam Sandler & Friends
Either you like Adam Sandler or you don’t. I happen to love the guy, maybe because I was a teenager when he was a cast member on Saturday Night Live or maybe because one time in LA I saw him eating brunch at the Malibu Inn or maybe it all comes down to that Hannukah song. His seemingly irrepressible urge to smile, his stupid songs with hilarious lyrics, his dopey eyes, his lack of pretention, his way of looking like he got lost on his way to someone else’s party but sure he’ll stop and tell a few jokes and sing songs—it’s the perfect comedy for stoners. Get as high as possible and see him perform at Benaroya Hall with “surprise special guests.” CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

MUSIC

75. DVSN
Toronto electro-R&B group DVSN has pulled ahead of the pack to define their genre for the 21st century. Enjoy all their multi-platinum singles along with newer material from their recently released second album Morning After at tonight's show.

JANUARY 23

MUSIC

76. John Maus, Holy Shit
John Maus's music will likely remind you of his former collaborator Ariel Pink's, with its casual, hazily pretty melodies and quasi-tongue-in-cheek, melodramatic tone. His third album—We Must Become the Pitiless Censors of Ourselves—sounds as if it's coated in slick gauze. Maus seems to be wearing his heart on his sleeve, waxing romantic in a deep croon, but, as a former philosophy professor, he may be putting us all on with a simulacrum of a throwback heartthrob retooled for our current hypnagogic-pop moment ("Pussy is not a matter of fact," he sings, poker-facedly). He creates the illusion that he's singing in a mausoleum, with slicked-back hair, using a chintzy drum machine, third-hand synths, and a four-track. But Maus's tunes quickly insinuate themselves into your memory, even as you wonder if dude's taking the piss. Panda Bear, Aziz Ansari, and Lil B are fans, if that sways you. DAVE SEGAL

77. Luna
One of the finest groups to take the Velvet Underground sound (third and fourth LPs, mainly) overground, Luna make a comeback after a decade hiatus. Over seven albums dating back to 1992’s Lunapark, ex-Galaxie 500 frontman Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, and co. repeatedly explored that familiar vein of mildly melancholy and wittily observational rock that always felt like it was beginning to see the light cast by Lou Reed. Luna sanded off the Velvets’ rougher edges for a stroll on the mild side of the archetypically New York City avant-rockers’ chugging and meditative approaches. This may be the last time you get to witness these mellow charmers in the flesh. As Wareham sings on the “Foggy Notion”-like tune from their sterling debut album, “I can't wait.” DAVE SEGAL

78. Yung Lean & Sad Boys
Swedish rapper and producer Yung Lean is only 21 years old, but he released his debut mixtape in 2013 and has already released multiple singles under his label Sad Boys Entertainment.

READINGS & TALKS

79. Anne Fadiman: The Wine Lover's Daughter
Anne Fadiman is well known for her acclaimed 1997 biography of a Hmong refugee family from Laos, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, which chronicles the family's navigation of the American health care system. Join her as she presents her newest book, The Wine Lover’s Daughter: A Memoir, which tells the story of her parents, including the New Yorker editor Cliff Fadiman.

80. Local 76-493: Jazz and the Racial Integration of Seattle’s Musicians’ Union
The Black Musicians' Union, Local 76-493, assembled many jazz players who were not allowed to play in Seattle's biggest clubs and helped them foster a brilliant musical scene of their own. Meet these union members, who'll speak about their movement and about the integration of the Musicians' Unions later on. There will, of course, be a jazz performance by current 493ers.

JANUARY 25

FOOD & DRINK

81. The Whale Wins Wine Night: Badia a Coltibuono - Chianti Classic
Badia a Coltibuono, “the abbey of good culture,” is a legendary, sprawling, 1000-year-old wine estate with a lush botanical garden and ancient stone monastery in the Chianti region of Italy, which has been presided over by the Stucchi Prinetti family since 1846. Sixth-generation winemaker Roberto Stucchi will join Renee Erickson’s crew at the Whale Wins for an evening of plentiful pours of real ruby-red Chianti Classico, flowing alongside Tuscan-inspired small plates from the Whale Wins’ smoldering wood-fired oven.

MUSIC

82. Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band, Nicki Bluhm
Renaissance man Josh Ritter manages to be both a celebrated singer-songwriter and a New York Times bestselling novelist. He'll showcase at least one of those skills tonight with the Royal City Band and Nicki Bluhm.

83. Queens of the Stone Age
Hard and heavy quasi-Seattleites Queens of the Stone Age will return to town on their Villains World Tour to do what they do best: loud, fast, and cocky rock and roll.

READINGS & TALKS

84. Charles Mann: The Wizard and the Prophet
Environmental historian Charles Mann's new book The Wizard and the Prophet explores two trends in thinking about the future of resources: Wizards who believe that human ingenuity will solve future shortages, and Prophets who warn that we must cut consumption if we are to preserve the planet. Hear Mann, a correspondent for the Atlantic, Science, and Wired, give his own perspective.

85. Major Margaret Witt: Tell
Major Margaret Witt attracted international attention after she was discharged from the military on a "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" violation (The Stranger's Eli Sanders covered the story several times). Eventually a federal judge in Tacoma ruled that she should be reinstated, and just months after that decision was made, Obama repealed DADT. Now Witt will visit Seattle to tell her own story and share her new memoir, Tell: Love, Defiance, and the Military Trial at the Tipping Point for Gay Rights.

86. WYNK: Ijeoma Oluo
Why can't white people say the N-word? What do you mean by privilege? But don't all lives matter? What do you mean when you say "intersectionality"? If you're seriously struggling with the answers to those questions, then current editor-at-large of The Establishment and former Stranger contributor Ijeoma Oluo's So You Want To Talk About Race? is here for you. In the book, Oluo employs humor and plenty of anaphora to explain, chapter by chapter, some basic ideas about race that a lot of powerful people (and powerfully loud people) don't seem to quite understand. RICH SMITH

JANUARY 25-27

COMEDY

87. Nate Bargatze
Tennessee's Nate Bargatze (The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon) has been called "a comic who should be big" by Marc Maron. Given that he's the son of a clown/magician, he probably has weirder observational humor than most.

MUSIC

88. Dausgaard Conducts Brahms
Last month, the Symphony announced that guest conductor Thomas Dausgaard will take over for the current (and beloved) music director, Ludovic Morlot, in 2019, so this will be your first chance to see him play the orchestra with a newfound sense of ownership and commitment. This suite of pastoral pieces from Brahms will be a good place to start, and the music, which Brahms described as "all blue sky, babbling of streams, sunshine and cool green shade" will be a bright spot in dreary January. RICH SMITH

JANUARY 25-31

FESTIVALS

89. Children's Film Festival Seattle
The Children's Film Festival is founded on two premises: 1) Children are not stupid and 2) they deserve beautiful world cinema just like us grown-ups with underused film degrees. The organizers at Northwest Film Forum believe that art can do heavy lifting for "racial equity and diversity, inclusivity, social justice, [and] global awareness" through brilliant storytelling and lovely sound and imagery. For this year's theme, "Dream the Future," the festival reaches across the globe (Bamse and the Witch's Daughter from Sweden, 5 Rupees from India, Hero Steps from Colombia) and revives masterpieces of the past (Hayao Miyazaki's Castle in the Sky, Karel Zeman's Invention for Destruction), in a splendid mix of live action and animation. There are also shorts programs, film workshops for your baby Bergmans, and even a pancake breakfast. Don't have a tadpole to bring to the movies? Go anyway. The films are age-appropriate, but they don't talk down to kids and they won't talk down to you.

JANUARY 26

COMEDY

90. Lovett or Leave It
The humorous Lovett or Leave It podcast's host, Jon Lovett, used to speech-write for Hillary Clinton and hosts Pod Save America. Join him and his special guests for a fun discussion of politics.

FOOD & DRINK

91. Winter Drams Spirits Festival
Surrender to hedonism in style at this festival hosted by the Seattle Spirits Society, where you can glut your appetite on a supply of unlimited tacos and apps from Marination, sample over 100 different spirits (all types of whiskey, including bourbon, Scotch, and Japanese single malts, as well as tequila, mezcal, rum, gin, and others) from over 25 distillers, and smoke hand-rolled cigars from San Juan Cigar Company while overlooking the view from the rooftop deck.

MUSIC

92. The Flesh Eaters
A garage-punk outfit that took their name from the trashier corners of the drive-in circuit—what could be better? (The Flesh Eaters centers on stranded humans and ravenous creatures.) Of the roots bands to emerge from SoCal, the Flesh Eaters were by far the scariest. With his monster-movie brows and bloodthirsty growl, Chris Desjardins made for a formidable frontman. He's also proven himself as an actor (Allison Anders’s Border Radio) and producer (Dream Syndicate's Days of Wine and Roses), among other skills. The Flesh Eaters' crowning glory, 1981's A Minute to Pray, a Second to Die, recently received the reissue treatment, and Chris D. has assembled a band of LA luminaries, including X’s John Doe, to bring it to life. KATHY FENNESSY

93. Matoma
Young Norwegian electronica producer, DJ, and pianist Matoma will bring the groove-heavy bass back to Seattle on their One in a Million Tour.

94. Rebel Souljahz
Reggae partiers and ska stalwarts Rebel Souljahz will come to Seattle on their latest tour stop.

READINGS & TALKS

95. Thomas Graham, Jr. and Scott Montgomery: Seeing the Light
Join diplomat Thomas Graham Jr., who participated in nonproliferation talks for 30 years, and his co-author Scott Montgomery to learn about the environmental benefits of nuclear power. Seeing the Light: The Case for Nuclear Power in the 21st Century comes with a recommendation from Hans Blix: "It merits broad reading by anyone interested in the future of energy generation, from the general public to students and scientists to policymakers."

JANUARY 26-27

FOOD & DRINK

96. Strange Brewfest
Port Townsend's annual beer festival offers pours from over 30 breweries, from classics to Northwest-inspired oddballs.

MUSIC

97. Timbrrr! Winter Music Festival
This event in Leavenworth—the infamous German-themed town/tourist attraction nestled in the Cascades—looks like the coziest mid-winter music festival, filled with beardo-magnet amenities like skiing and snowboarding, a hot-toddy garden, wine tastings, and festival-branded flannel shirts. The weekend’s musical offerings are varied, with numerous local and national acts ranging from indie rock to hiphop, including Ra Ra Riot, Cave Singers, The Black Tones, Hobosexual, Y La Bamba, Great Grandpa, Wall of Ears, Bread & Butter, Gifted Gab, Moorea Masa & The Mood, Burying Ground, Debbie Miller, and Jessica Dennison + Jones, with more to be announced. BRITTNIE FULLER

JANUARY 27

COMEDY

98. Ricky Gervais
Welcome the prickly British comedian, creator of The Office, Extras, and Derek, on his stand-up comeback tour, Humanity.

FOOD & DRINK

99. Ninth Annual Belgian Fest
Hooray for Belgian yeast, enabling top Washington breweries to produce exotic tripels, dubbels, saisons, wits, abbeys, and lambics! Yes indeed: at this beer fest featuring over 100 brews, all beers have been made with imported Belgian yeast. Sample deliciousness from local brewers.

MUSIC

100. Dave B, J. Robb, J'Von
Dave B’s skillful, dynamic, personal (but never corny) raps always have something to say, but never let that get in the way of a track actually sounding good. MIKE RAMOS

101. An Evening with Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen
Remember when Julia Roberts and Lyle Lovett were married? That was weird. Anyway, here's prolific country crooner Lyle and his longtime friend, equally iconic Americana musician Robert Earl Keen. They'll be playing a full set together, with charm enough that's sure to please even the most cynical of old school country music enthusiasts.

102. Passion Pit
Passion Pit are five guys with brown hair who make pop music that sounds like the work of coked-up dance robots. The songs are all glitchy edges and squealing vocals and layers of indecipherable sounds piled on top of each other. They're collages. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

103. Rosanne Cash, John Leventhal
Though gifted with her family name, Rosanne Cash is known for her singular talent as a long beloved singer-songwriter. She'll be supported by her backing band and John Leventhal for a night of heartfelt Southern folk.

OPENING JANUARY 27

ART

104. Neddy Artist Awards Exhibition
The Neddy Awards, given by Cornish College, recompense artists living in the Puget Sound area. This year, Tacoman Christopher Paul Jordan and Korean/Indigenous artist Che Sehyun took top prizes, while Barbara Sternberger, Gillian Theobald, Tuan Nguyen, Gretchen Bennett, Marita Dingus, and Dakota Gearhart were runners-up. See the works of these distinguished locals.

105. Tavares Strachan: Always, Sometimes, Never
Born and raised in the Bahamas and currently based in New York, Tavares Strachan is a conceptual artist whose work in a diverse range of media investigates the overlapping domains of science, technology, and history—in particular the hidden stories and agendas behind common cultural narratives. His signature media include neon sculpture and projected lights, often presented alongside reflecting pools that suggest the distortion of perception and reveal invisible implications. Strachan has exhibited widely, including at the 2013 Venice Biennale. Always, Sometimes, Never is the first presentation of his work in Seattle. EMILY POTHAST

JANUARY 28

MUSIC

106. Bruce Cockburn
Folk- and jazz-influenced singer-songwriter Bruce Cockburn is widely regarded as one of Canada's finest exports. He'll play an evening set rife with memories from his exceptionally long career.

107. First Aid Kit
Swedish sister duo Johanna and Klara Söderberg perform sensitive, layered folk-pop harmonies as First Aid Kit. This show will be their first Seattle show in several years.

108. Joe Purdy, Amber Rubarth
Self-described troubadour Joe Purdy has racked up the accolades for his broad, folkloric singer-songwriter talents. He'll be joined by Amber Rubarth on this tour stop.

CLOSING JANUARY 28

PERFORMANCE

109. Wonderland
Wonderland returns! Can Can will transform its venue into a snowy chalet and populate it with teasing beauties. VIP tickets get you champagne and a meal as well. There's also a brunch show that's safe for kids.

JANUARY 28-30

READINGS & TALKS

110. National Geographic Live: View From Above
Terry Virts, onetime commander of the International Space Station, installed the 360-degree view module Cupola and took more pictures in space than anyone up to that point. Find out what the Earth looks like from orbit at this event, presented by the Seattle Symphony.

JANUARY 29

READINGS & TALKS

111. David Cay Johnston: It’s Even Worse Than You Think
I don't know how it gets much worse than casually and consistently provoking nuclear war via Twitter, but if there's one guy who might be able to make the argument that Trump's presidency is worse than we know, it's David Cay Johnston. The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist first began chronicling Trump's exploits in the late 1980s, and he's since emerged as the expert that cable news hosts tap when they want to discuss the simple, predictable, but volitile machinations of the president's psyche. In his new book, It’s Even Worse Than You Think: What the Trump Administration Is Doing to America, Johnston assess the damage done (thus far) to the administrative state. RICH SMITH

112. Michael Shermer: Heavens on Earth
Michael Shermer is the head of Skeptic Magazine, and, to some, a little overly optimistic, as revealed in his book The Moral Arc: How Science and Reason Lead Humanity Toward Truth, Justice, and Freedom. He'll present his newest tome, Heavens on Earth: The Scientific Search for the Afterlife, Immortality, and Utopia, which examines belief in the afterlife—and what makes life worth living for those who don't share it.

JANUARY 31

FOOD & DRINK

113. Taylor Shellfish Night Tide Oyster Soiree
This month, on January 31st, a blood moon, super moon, and lunar eclipse will all coincide, creating a rare "super blue blood moon" that hasn't occurred for 150 years. At Taylor Shellfish Farm, with the moon "shining sulkily" just as in Lewis Carroll's "The Walrus and the Carpenter," you can traipse along the briny beach illuminated by the glow of lanterns to hand-pick your oysters. Then choose your own adventure: learn to shuck your haul yourself or let one of the seasoned shellfish pros handle it, before proceeding to gulp your finds down with wine or beer around a crackling fire.

MUSIC

114. The Wombats, Blaenavon, Future Feats
Fast-paced English rockers the Wombats are back on top with their latest album Glitterbug. They'll be touring through the US later this year with Weezer and Pixies, but for this stop they're the real headliners, with Blaenavon and Future Feats as bill support.

READINGS & TALKS

115. WA129: Tod Marshall and Claudia Castro Luna
This is going to be a big night for literature in Washington. Outgoing State Poet Laureate Tod Marshall will officially pass on the laurels to Claudia Castro Luna, who will be the first woman of color and immigrant to assume the post. During his two year tenure, Marshall edited an anthology called WA129. In recognition of that accomplishment, and in celebration of the peaceful transfer of poetic power, the book's contributors will read and perform. Look forward to work from Seattle Civic Poet Anastacia Reneé, Duane Niatum, Georgia McDade, Phillip Red Eagle, Quenton Baker, Rachel Kessler, Dawn Pichon Barron, Bill Carty, and Shankar Narayan. RICH SMITH

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