Don't miss powerhouse performer Scott Shoemaker in Ms. Pak-Man: Out of Order! this weekend.
Our music critics have already chosen the 28 best concerts this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn to pick the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks in every genre—from the closing of Bowie by Mick Rock to the Seattle Jewish Film Festival, and from the wide release of A Wrinkle in Time to Oyster Madness. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.


Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Daniel H. Pink
In his new book, When, Drive bestselling author Daniel H. Pink explores the secrets of "good timing." He poses questions like: "Why should we avoid going to the hospital in the afternoon?" and "What is the ideal time to quit a job, switch careers, or get married?"

Robert Reich: The Common Good
The respected left-wing economist and fierce critic of the Republican-held government will present his book about "virtuous cycles that reinforce and build the common good, as well as vicious cycles that undermine it."

MONDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Lee Davignon: Materialism
Lee Davignon shows sculpture and textile objects resembling sea urchins and strange hybrid appliances.
Closing Saturday

MONDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Bowie by Mick Rock
The day after David Bowie died, Stranger music and arts editor Sean Nelson wrote the following: "Bowie’s music and presentation calibrated my consciousness to look beyond the obvious, to expect layers, to get that there should be something to get. My feeling for Bowie was never theoretical, as it is with a lot of artists I admire. It was love, though I didn’t ever believe that love was returned or acknowledged. Or needed. Which made it the correct response. Such was the power of his charisma, his talent, his utter commitment to the conception and performance of himself. What is not to love about the creation called David Bowie? In an age when the standing ovation has been devalued, it’s worth considering how few other artists have ever deserved one simply for existing so utterly for so long." As you wander through this collection of 65 photographs of David Bowie taken by renowned British photographer Mick Rock, rare performance footage, and oral history interviews, you can love David Bowie deeply. Just because you want to.
Closing Sunday

FOOD & DRINK

Oyster Madness
Basketball isn't the only March Madness: Bellevue restaurant Pearl will be hosting a four-week celebration of all things oyster, with special menus and different preparations (raw, baked, fried and grilled) and tips and education provided by Taylor Shellfish oyster expert Call Nichols. Plus, get gratis oysters while they last on their Free Oyster Fridays.

TUESDAY

ART

Sense of Place: Through the Lens of Al Smith
Sit in on a discussion about the history of Seattle's black community and see selections from more than 4,000 images not included in Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith exhibit. Presenters include Stephanie Johnson-Toliver, Carol Peoples-Procter, and Quin'Nita Cobbins.

READINGS & TALKS

Madame Nielsen: Endless Summer
Genderqueer writer Madame Nielsen is responsible for the Suicide Mission trilogy, The Sovereign, Fall of the Great Satan, and many other works. The author will give a reading of their latest novel, Endless Summer, which is translated from Dutch by Gaye Kynoch.

Nancy Kress: If Tomorrow Comes
Science fiction writer Nancy Kress (who won a Hugo and Nebula award for her novella Beggars in Spain) will present her latest work, If Tomorrow Comes. In the novel, humans succeed in building a spaceship called Friendship that will allow them to travel home to Kindred. A crew of scientists, diplomats, and Rangers protect them on their journey, which turns out to be nothing like what they expected.

Salon of Shame
Writing that makes you cringe ("middle school diaries, high school poetry, unsent letters") is read aloud with unapologetic hilarity at the Salon of Shame.

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Hamilton Menu at Tavolàta
Pre-game for Lin-Manuel Miranda's musical sensation with a three-course prix-fixe dinner down the street before the show.

Hamilton Menu at the Carlile Room
Begin or finish your viewing of Lin Manuel Miranda's Founding Father musical sensation (playing at the Paramount from February 6-March 18) at the (Carlile) Room where it happens, with a themed menu that includes the Hamilton Hurricane cocktail, Lafayette-inspired Buns and Nips (pinch buns with mushrooms and pickled turnips), the Battle of Porktown, the Aaron Burr-ger, and Satisfries. Just don't throw away your (Jell-O) shot.

PERFORMANCE

Hamilton
Lin-Manuel Miranda is responsible for Hamilton's book, music, and lyrics, and he has squashed a dizzying number of words and concepts into this stunning production. You don't like musicals? Fine. Try Hamilton—its hiphop, jazz, and rap numbers have made people all over the country rethink their rigid anti-musical stance, and offered them juicy, controversial history about one of their Founding Fathers. The wildly popular show will be here for more than four glorious weeks. Joseph Morales and Nik Walker will star as Hamilton and Burr.

Hershey Felder as Irving Berlin
Not very many songwriters have legitimate claim to being the actual greatest songwriter who ever lived, but Irving Berlin is one—and not just because he successfully stripped Jesus clean out of the songs most closely associated with the two most Christian holidays (“White Christmas” and “Easter Parade”). This solo performance chronicles the life and career of a man who escaped the pogroms of czarist Russia only to perfect the musical and verbal idiom that helped define the American century. (Bonus: This show promises to provide a welcome palate cleanser after Holiday Inn, the indescribably poor Berlin pastiche that recently befouled the Seattle stage, so that’s good, too.) SEAN NELSON

WEDNESDAY

COMEDY

Anthony Jeselnik: Funny Games
When Jeselnik came to town awhile back, Lindy West, working at the Stranger at the time, simply said: "You really really really really really really ought to go." Now, the arrogant-personaed cringe comedian is back, fresh off a 2017 tour with Chris Rock.

Neil Hamburger
The more he fails, the more he wins over the crowd. That’s the paradox of Gregg Turkington’s shockingly enduring character, Neil Hamburger. With his greasy combover, phlegm-hawking, and beleaguered, hunched demeanor, the tuxedo’d entertainer dispenses mean-spirited, pop-culture-puncturing jokes that carry the whiff of stale cologne and motel-room desperation. Grinding sacred musical cows into fodder for dyspeptic, puntastic question/answer gags, Hamburger inspires guffaws and groans with remarkable consistency. His humor feels rancid going down… and that’s the whole point. What are the odds he’ll do that tasteless bit about Chris Cornell’s suicide in the late singer’s hometown? DAVE SEGAL

FILM

Best Worst Movies: The Rise of the Crapsterpiece
If you derive great pleasure from watching decidedly "bad" movies, consider this three-part class that explores the history of the genre. You'll learn about the early days of B-Movie pioneers like Ed Wood and Doris Wishman, the "rise of riffing" made popular by Mystery Science Theatre 3000, and current cult favorites like Miami Connection, The Room, Troll 2, and Sharknado.

FOOD & DRINK

Planes, Trains, and Traveling Chefs: Tim Love
At their Planes, Trains, & Traveling Chefs series, cozy Pike Place fixture Matt’s in the Market hosts intimate pop-up dinners with menus created in collaboration with big-deal visiting chefs. The next guest of honor is Texan celebrity chef and restaurateur Tim Love, who’s appeared on shows like Restaurant Startup and is the owner and executive chef of Fort Worth restaurants White Elephant Saloon, Love Shack, Woodshed Smokehouse, and Lonesome Dove Western Bistro. (He was also a backer of the erstwhile Kraken Congee in Pioneer Square.) He’ll team up with executive chef Jason McClure to create a six-course menu that blends his Lone Star State sensibilities with the quintessentially Seattle offerings of Pike Place Market. JULIANNE BELL

READINGS & TALKS

Elissa Ball: More or Less
Kelly Björk and Joe Rudko's More or Less is a collection of "comparisons" (jokes that use the mathematical "greater than" and "less than" symbols to poke fun at words' meanings) accompanied by illustrations. At this release party, hear readings from Richard Chiem, Raven Taylor, and Elissa Ball, and dance to a DJ set by Bankie Phones.

Ijeoma Oluo: So You Want to Talk About Race
So You Want to Talk About Race—the breakout book by Seattle-based writer, speaker, and emerging social media icon, Ijeoma Oluo—offers a fresh, compassionate, often witty approach to helping us have productive conversations about race and navigate these turbulent times. Drawing from a well of personal experience as a black woman with deep and intimate ties to the white world, Oluo distinguishes herself as a relatable yet nuanced commentator on a subject that so many others have tried less successfully to take on. It’s evident that she knows her theory, but she doesn’t get mired in the academic debates, instead offering vivid anecdotes from life on the front lines as well as practical advice that both longtime students of race in America as well as newcomers to the field will find useful. Because in an era when the public sphere can so quickly explode into anger, even violence, the way we talk matters. People’s life chances hang in the balance of our political discourse, and Oluo’s book shows us how we might swing that balance toward justice—one conversation at a time. DEEPA BHANDARU

KUOW Presents: That's Debatable. Amazon Is Good for Seattle
Over the past few months, we've seen cities across America all but beg for a second Amazon HQ to park its butt within their limits. But has Amazon actually been good for Seattle? KUOW will sponsor a debate between former deputy Maud Daudon and Paul Guppy of the Washington Policy Center (arguing pro) and former anti-establishment mayoral candidates Cary Moon and Nikkita Oliver (arguing against, obviously). The audience will also vote twice—once before the argument, and once after. Will you change your mind?

Patton Oswalt: Michelle McNamara's 'I'll Be Gone in the Dark'
You know Oswalt from his stomach-churningly funny stand-up, from his also-funny-but-way-more-than-merely-funny books (special shout out to Silver Screen Fiend, the actual story of my life), and from his often-embattled-but-typically-mostly-funny Twitter feed. Tonight, though, you will encounter an even more impressive side of Oswalt: the champion of the life and work of the late Michelle McNamara, the brilliant true crime journalist and writer to whom he was married. McNamara worked for many years on a book about the search for a man she dubbed “The Golden State Killer,” who terrorized Northern and Southern California, committing 50 rapes and 10 murders between 1976 and 1986. Though unfinished at the time of her death, I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer has been completed by her colleagues using McNamara’s extensive writings, interviews, and research. SEAN NELSON

Silent Reading Party
The silent-reading party turns nine years old in 2018. For almost a decade, people have been gathering in the Fireside Room of the Sorrento Hotel to escape the distractions of the city, and the distractions of their cell phones, to read silently to themselves in overstuffed chairs or couches in front of the fire while waiters bring them things and Paul Moore plays exquisite piano. It’s an odd phenomenon—nothing happens—but it’s as popular as ever. At last month’s party, there was a line out the door. Get there at least an hour early for prime seating. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

Beatrice & Benedict
Let it be lost on no one that "Benedict"—whose name in the source material for this opera is Benedick—is definitely a pun on "good dick." This is important because the title gets right to the heart of this warm and witty (and slightly anachronistic) collaboration between composer Hector Berlioz and the words of William Shakespeare, which are lifted from the B-storyline in Much Ado About Nothing. Ultimately, Benedict must choose between being a good soldier and being a good partner to Beatrice, a woman he's been tricked into loving. The Good Dick's name points you to the choice he makes, but it's fun as hell to watch him and Beatrice reluctantly come around to each other. Seattle Symphony's music director, Ludovic Morlot, is a great interpreter of his fellow countryman, Berlioz, and ACT Theatre artistic director John Langs has plenty of Shakespeare under his belt. Watching the visions of these two artists collide onstage will be a treat as well. RICH SMITH
No performance on Thursday

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Akio Takamori: Portraits and Sleepers
Seattle's art community is still reeling from the loss of beloved University of Washington professor Akio Takamori, who passed away early last year. Best known for his influential figurative work in ceramics—and for helping to make UW a nationwide destination for ceramics students—Takamori also completed a residency at the Museum of Glass in August 2014. During this time, he created mold-made figurative flasks inspired by ancient Roman glass art, embellishing the surfaces with enamel paints. Portraits and Sleepers is an exhibition of these glass works. It's a rare opportunity to see another side of a local treasure. EMILY POTHAST
Opening Wednesday

The Gin Game
One of the all-time chestnuts of the legitimate stage comes to Everett featuring two of Seattle’s all-time favorites, Kurt Beattie and Marianne Owen, as aging residents of a nursing home, who sublimate the dread of death by playing cards and tearing each other apart with words. However familiar the play might be from drama classes and monologue books, The Gin Game has a seemingly infinite capacity for renewal in the hands of the right actors, which is to say that the only way this show can go wrong is if the building floods. SEAN NELSON

Love, Chaos, and Dinner
Beloved circus/cabaret/comedy institution Teatro ZinZanni lost their home in Seattle Center, but they've found a new space for a dinner theater production of Love, Chaos, and Dinner. They promise "the same stunning, velvet-laden, and iconic Belgian spiegeltent Seattleites will remember from Teatro ZinZanni’s former location on lower Queen Anne." The cast is led by first-time "Madame ZinZanni" Ariana Savalas, and will feature a duo on aerial trapeze, a magician, a "contortionist-puppet," a yodeling dominatrix, a hoop aerialist, and a Parisian acrobat.

The Maltese Falcon
Book-It Repertory Theatre and Cafe Nordo will collaborate on a stage version of the lush and gritty noir classic The Maltese Falcon, adapted by Jane Jones and Kevin McKeon. As private dick Sam Spade seeks the priceless jewel-encrusted falcon for some sketchy clients, you'll tuck into Nordo's special themed menu.

Romeo & Juliet
This cozy speakeasy, tucked under Pike Place Market, specializes in charismatic, cheese-cakey, nearly-nude entertainment (plus more covered-up brunch shows for the young and the prudish). Expect something a little sexier than your typical Shakespeare adaptation at this modernized cabaret show version of the tragic tale, paired with an original soundtrack. Make it a dinner date and order food and cocktails.

THURSDAY

ART

Capitol Hill Art Walk
Every second Thursday, rain or shine (or wintry mix), the streets of Capitol Hill are filled with tipsy art lovers checking out galleries and special events. In March, check out While Supplies Last at Amandine.

Critical Issues in Contemporary Art Practice
University of Washington's School of Art's yearly lecture series focuses on contemporary art and the social issues important to it. This week, hear from Carolyn Lazard, a "whatever artist who works in blah blah media on such n such ideas/thingamajigs."

COMEDY

Minority Retort
This showcase that highlights comedians of color is coming to Seattle. Join Jason Lamb, Julia Ramos, and Neeraj Srinivasan as they welcome hilarious local favorites El Sanchez, Monisa Brown, Ken Hamlett, Chris Mejia, and Wilfred Padua.

FILM

Winter Light: The Films of Ingmar Bergman
I know. It’s Ingmar Bergman. I know, most of his films are very slow. I know, you want to see lots of action and explosions and all of that sort of thing. I know, I know, I know. But you must still watch Bergman's films. Look at it this way: A film like The Commuter, which must not be missed, is your fat-rich steak, and a movie like Bergman’s Through the Glass Darkly or Silence or Persona is your broccoli. You just can’t eat steak all of the time. You will die from just eating steak. You need your veggies. You can almost live forever on a diet of just films of the great Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. CHARLES MUDEDE
This week, the film is The Silence.

FOOD & DRINK

International Women's Day Pub Crawl
This isn't your average bar crawl: for International Women's Day, venture out to three participating women-owned bars and businesses to support Northwest Abortion Access Fund and NARAL Pro-Choice Washington Foundation. Bonus: You'll get a free pint glass from Floating Bridge Brewing and a free beer from the Blue Moon.

READINGS & TALKS

Amy Chua with Bill Radke: Political Tribes
In her new book, Political Tribes, Yale Law School professor (and proud "Tiger Mom") Amy Chua argues that American nationalism blinds us to the tribal tendencies that drive much of our political behavior. She goes on to critique "identitarians" of all stripes, and encourages us to work toward "a more difficult unity that acknowledges the reality of group differences and fights the deep inequities that divide us." Chua has written convincingly about the perils of our tribe-blindness in the past (check out World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability for more about how it leads us into long, bloody, un-winnable wars), and it'll be interesting to hear how her criticism of identity politics "on the left and on the right" goes over here in sunny Seattle. KUOW's Bill Radke, host of The Record, will help start/put out any fires onstage. RICH SMITH

Be Bold Seattle: International Women's Day
The World Economic Forum’s 2017 Global Gender Report estimated the date for full gender equality throughout the world as 217 years in the future. At this celebration of International Women’s Day, speakers will hold forth on how to speed up the processes of gender justice and parity.

Temple Grandin
When animal behavior expert, scientist, and speaker on autism issues Dr Temple. Grandin arrives in town, her events sell out very rapidly. Such, sadly, is the case this time. If you want to hear this prominent disability rights activist's perspective on "Equity and Difference," you will have to show up early for a standby seat. Good luck.

PERFORMANCE

National Theatre Live: Hamlet
Watch the revenge and insanity unfold in this production of the tragedy of the prince of Denmark starring Benedict Cumberbatch. This is a rebroadcast of the 2015 production at the National Theatre in London, projected on a Seattle screen.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

Ms. Pak-Man: Out of Order!
Scott Shoemaker is “a powerhouse and an incredible performer,” says his frequent collaborator BenDeLaCreme. A few years back, Shoemaker started dressing up as a giant yellow dot and putting a bow in his hair and performing cabarets as Ms. Pak-Man, the video game character brought to life. Ms. Pak-Man: Out of Order! is the fourth installment of the acclaimed series. “Watch this world-renowned video game superstar of the 1980s pop power pills while she shares scandalous songs and stories about her life and loves,” the advance billing says, adding: “She sings! She dances! She drinks! She might black out!” CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

Prehistoric Body Theater Workshop/Performance
In collaboration with paleontologists Dr. Greg Wilson and Dr. Dave Evans, Ari Rudenko directs a prehistoric animal dance that combines Japanese butoh theater and Indonesian traditional/contemporary dance influences with "a science-based comparative examination of the anatomy, locomotion, and theoretical behavior of key extinct species featured in the performances." From February 3 to March 8 on Saturdays and Thursdays, take part in free workshops, leading up to the performance audition on March 10. In May, watch Ghosts of Hell Creek, a dance depicting one of the last birdlike dinosaurs in the days before the cataclysm that ended the reign of the "terrible lizards," and one of the first mammals to emerge from the wreckage.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Hir
Hir isn't like the rest of Taylor Mac's plays, but it's the play that made Mac famous. That's because it looks like the style of play repertory theaters jizz over, which is kitchen sink realism. Hir, making its Seattle debut at ArtsWest, seems familiar to contemporary theatergoers: two kids and their parents sitting around their kitchen fighting. That should be a snooze-fest, but it's not because Mac's writing is hilarious, and nothing in the play is as it first appears. It's ultimately a clever, innovative play about gender (and theater) that audiences will continue to unpack for decades. CHASE BURNS

Kim Lusk: A Dance for Dark Horses
Velocity Dance Center crowned local choreographer Kim Lusk as their "Made In Seattle" program fellow this year, which means they're giving her a bunch of support and producing her first full-length performance, A Dance for Dark Horses. Based on a short preview I saw, it seems like they made a good choice. Lusk's piece is a humorous, light-hearted meditation on a group of extroverted introverts (or would it be introverted extroverts?) trying to distinguish themselves from one another, but also trying to be good team players. Her funny, open-hearted, kinda dead-pan style will make you smile, which is rare in a genre that's lousy with self-seriousness. RICH SMITH

FRIDAY

COMEDY

Bob Saget
If you've only seen Bob Saget on old episodes of America's Funniest Home Videos or Full House, you should know that he's been nominated for a Grammy for his much less family-friendly stand-up acts.

FILM

A Wrinkle in Time Opening
After the excitement for Black Panther is spent, we can turn to A Wrinkle in Time, a film based on a novel that everyone seems to have read or heard of but has forgotten. Nevertheless, the adaptation of the book will be the first big-budget Hollywood film directed by a black woman, Ava DuVernay (she directed Selma). The budget of this fantasy film is said to be more than $100 million. This is amazing. What will a black woman do with all that money? We will see. CHARLES MUDEDE

FOOD & DRINK

All Citrus Pop-Up Dinner
This locally minded dinner from Chef Aaron Tekulve of Surrell features citrus in every course from appetizers to dessert.

READINGS & TALKS

Ibram X. Kendi: How To Be Anti-Racist and Why It Matters
2016 National Book Award-winning historian Dr. Ibram X. Kendi will present his book Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which challenges some of our country's toxic institutional ideologies.

Shoba Rao: Girls Burn Brighter
After her mother’s death, Poornima is left to care for her siblings. When an independently minded girl named Savitha enters their household, Poornima begins to imagine what her life could be like outside of her family. Such is the story of Shoba Rao's debut novel, Girls Burn Brighter. She'll be joined in conversation by Laurie Frankel.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Susanna Bluhm: Mississippi & Arizona
Many of us reacted to the 2016 election by crying, binge drinking, and unfriending family members on Facebook. Susanna Bluhm vowed to visit as many so-called "red states" as possible over the next four years to have firsthand experiences in places she only knew through the media. "I'm not trying to have the quintessential experience of each state," says Bluhm, but she's also "not observing from a distance." Mississippi & Arizona is what happens when a queer, white mother who happens to be one of the most sensuous and thoughtful oil painters in the Pacific Northwest seeks out intimate experiences in two places very different from her own. EMILY POTHAST
Opening Friday

COMEDY

Paula Poundstone
Paula Poundstone is a divisive comedian. She placed 88 on Comedy Central’s 2004 list of top 100 stand-ups while clocking in at No. 6 in Maxim magazine’s 2007 list of “Worst Comedians of All-Time.” Well-known for her stints on NPR’s news quiz show Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me, she specializes in relatable, everyday anecdotes that come loaded with humorous twists, often glazed with self-deprecation and mild absurdity. There’s something Seinfeldian about her act, but she’s a bit goofier overall than Jerry. Poundstone’s a seasoned pro, albeit not with the spiciest ingredients. DAVE SEGAL

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

COMEDY

Vir Das
Extremely popular Bollywood comedian and actor Vir Das (who has appeared in films including BadMaash Company, Delhi Belly, and Revolver Rani, and has performed stand-up comedy all over the world) will grace humble Bellevue.

FILM

Animation Show of Shows
Celebrate the art of animation at the 19th Annual Animation Show of Shows, a six-day-long event that will feature more than a dozen films from artists Quentin Baillieux, Lia Bertels, Pete Docter, and many others around the world.

PERFORMANCE

Mutaciones
The group behind this experimental performance defines itself as an "intergenerational Afro-Indigenous Two-Spirit art collaborative." This play will take you through rituals and stories in the past, present, and future, addressing issues of "indigeneity, land, language, ancestry, gender, spirit, sexuality, desire, bodies, borders, technologies, sickness, and healing."

SATURDAY

ART

Georgetown Art Attack
Once a month, the art that resides in the tiny airport hamlet of Georgetown ATTACKS all passersby. In more literal terms, it's the day of art openings and street wonderment. In March, check out Wallace Wood's illustrations at Fantagraphics and Thru the Roof at the Alice.

Matt Browning
Before Neddy Award winner Matt Browning moved to Vancouver to earn his MFA from the University of British Columbia, he was a Seattle artist represented by Lawrimore Project (RIP) and a member of the artist-run gallery Crawl Space (also RIP). Known for works that examine athleticism, masculine socialization, and hierarchical value systems, Browning's sculptures also exhibit a tender handmade sensibility—a potent combination that earned him a place in the 2017 Whitney Biennial. His most recent work involves zinc spheres made out of the cores of pennies (since 1982, pennies are copper-plated zinc), exploring the constantly shifting relationship between perceived value and materiality. EMILY POTHAST

FILM

Home Movies: Filmmakers Document Their Families
What happens when filmmakers turn their cameras on their own families? This series, curated by Brian Belovarac, focuses on a trend that began in the 1970s with the invention of portable 8mm filmmaking equipment. See films by everyone from Andy Warhol to China's Liu Jiayin by way of Belgian experimentalist Chantal Akerman and the American Nelson Mandela Award winner Thomas Allen Harris.

Saturday Secret Matinees
Grand Illusion and the Sprocket Society will continue their tradition of pairing an adventure serial with a different secret matinee movie every week. This year, the serial is Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe, and the theme of the feature film will change every fortnight (maybe they stole the idea from the Stranger's new printing schedule. Though probably not). These themes include "Alien Invasion!," "Swashbuckling Heroes!," "Very Bad Deals," "Twisted Intrigues," "Atomic Monsters," and "Widescreen Thrills." The coolest part, from a film buff point of view? Everything will be presented on 16mm.

Seattle Jewish Film Festival
This annual film festival explores and celebrates global Jewish and Israeli life, history, complexity, culture, and filmmaking. The festival showcases international, independent and award-winning Jewish-themed and Israeli cinema, and the audience votes on their favorites. This year, the theme is "isREEL Life" in celebration of Israel's 70th anniversary. On opening night, see Maktub, a mob comedy by Oded Raz, and attend a Tom Douglas-catered dessert party. There will also be an Eastside opening featuring the documentary Shalom Bollywood about Jewish Indian performers. Other highlights will include the excellent documentary Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story and a ceremony honoring filmmaker Tiffany Shlain (The Tribe).

FOOD & DRINK

Bourbon & Bacon Fest
It’s no secret that the smoky, fatty flavor of bacon holds a near-primal appeal, and it’s only magnified when paired with the caramelly, butterscotch-tinged notes of bourbon. At this event, you can sample plenty of crispy, pork-studded dishes from Puget Sound vendors like Pecos Pit, Bavarian Meats, and Top Pot Doughnuts alongside bourbons and other brown liquors from all over the country. Proceeds benefit Treehouse, a local nonprofit that provides academic resources and support for children in foster care. JULIANNE BELL

WhiskeyRocks Northwest
Expand your knowledge of whiskey by sampling malty booze from around the world while hearing live music from Spike and the Impalers, the Groove Surfers, and Brian DiJulio and the Love Jacks.

READINGS & TALKS

Jonathan Evison: All About Lulu
The Bainbridge Island novelist comes into the city to read from his first novel, All About Lulu, which is now celebrating its 10th anniversary. I haven’t read All About Lulu, but I read another of Evison's novels, The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, before it became a movie, and was delighted to discover that Evison is a multitalented fiction writer—funny, insightful, vivid, great with dialogue and characterization. All About Lulu is about a young vegetarian growing up in a family of bodybuilders and dealing with “the death of his mother, the arrival of a new step-mother, and his irrepressible crush on his new step-sister, Lulu,” according to its publisher. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

SUNDAY

FOOD & DRINK

2nd Annual Dumpling Fest
My number-one craving in these cold winter months is dumplings in any and all of their forms, whether they’re xiao long bao or potato pierogi slathered in sour cream. So it’s with particular delight that I recommend this cross-cultural celebration of pillowy pockets of goodness. Tom Douglas will assemble peddlers of doughy delicacies of every persuasion, from potstickers to pelmeni, in one room, so that you can drift from station to station stuffing their wares into your face. Participating businesses include Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi’s Revel, Dumpling Tzar, Rocky’s Empanadas, and more. JULIANNE BELL

Modern Moroccan Dinner
Food blogger Ashley Rodriguez of Not Without Salt will host a vibrant dinner bursting with bright Moroccan flavors like harissa and preserved lemon.

READINGS & TALKS

The Poetry Brothel: Cabaret Voltaire
In this unusual immersive poetry event, you'll go to a "brothel" where, instead of sexual favors, your "prostitute" will bestow poetry upon you in private or in a cozy corner. Even if you don't take them up on it, you can still watch the burlesque and variety show onstage as the performers pay homage to Hugo Ball's Cabaret Voltaire, that iconic, short-lived center of the Dada movement in 1916 Zurich.

National Geographic Live: A Wild Life
Young Bertie Gregory (Scientific Exploration Society Zenith Explorer of the year in 2015) takes photos of wild and urban animal photography, revealing the bond between humans and animals in cities around the world. See his work at this show, presented by the Seattle Symphony.

Willy Vlautin: Don't Skip Out on Me
Willy Vlautin—the Portland-based author of Lean on Pete, a movie version of which will come out later this month—has a new novel out called Don't Skip Out on Me, in which a Paiute and Irish ranch hand named Horace decides to become a boxer.