DJs remix scenes in the life of a Puerto Rican family in Welcome to Arroyo's. Dave Hastings
Our music critics have already chosen the 40 best music shows this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn. Here are their picks for the best events in every genre—from The Stranger's Night School: NIMBY, YIMBY & PHIMBY to the FOCS Arts Fest, and from the 5th Avenue Theatre's production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame to Bite of Greece. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

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Jump to: Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

TUESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

1. Jenny Xie, Cathy Linh Che
Jenny Xie's intelligence, precision, and genuine fascination with language shine through in her stunning debut from Graywolf Press, Eye Level. As her persona wanders from Phnom Penh, Corfu, Hanoi, and New York "trying on each passing town for size," she tells stories of immigration and emigration, rooting and uprooting, and of language's ability to connect us but also to keep us apart. She fills her poems with quiet humor, endearing self-deprecation, fresh imagery, and clear-eyed reckoning—all the qualities of a collection you'll want to return to over and over again, not because you're obsessed or anything, but because you really like spending time in this kind of mind. She'll be joined by Cathy Linh Che, whose Split won the Norma Farber First Book Award and the Association for Asian American Studies Award. RICH SMITH

2. Night School: NIMBY, YIMBY & PHIMBY
Zach Lubarsky (Seattle Tech 4 Housing), Hodan Hassan (Got Green), and Lauren Loe (the Urbanist) will discuss Seattle's housing crisis at the latest iteration of The Stranger's Night School discussion series, moderated by Heidi Groover.

TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY

FILM

3. The Big Lebowski 20th Anniversary
About this film, which made Rolling Stone's list of "10 Best Stoner Movies of All Time," Stranger contributor Bradley Steinbacher once wrote: "If pressed to name my single favorite moment in my single favorite Coen brothers movie, The Big Lebowski, it would be a three-way tie between Jeff 'the Dude' Lebowski's dumpster-bumping car crash, the sheriff's assault on the Dude with a coffee mug, and the Raymond Chandler–esque discovery of Jackie Treehorn's hard-on doodle." BRADLEY STEINBACHER

TUESDAY-THURSDAY

ART

4. a lone
Two major stars to keep your eye on at this Seattle-inspired exhibition of "empathetic voices and word-based creations": Tommy Pico and Leena Joshi. Pico is the most entertaining poet in the scene at the moment. Read any of his three books—IRL, Nature Poem, or the forthcoming Junk—if you want to spend a few hours laughing/crying uncontrollably about love, sex, life on and off the rez, and snacks. Joshi is a multidisciplinary artist with unparalleled storytelling abilities. In half a paragraph, she can effortlessly transport you from a front lawn in Seattle to a busy alley in India and back again. It's some kind of magic. Pico and Joshi—along with Alexandra Bell, Yrsa Daley, Laura Sullivan Cassidy, Martine Syms, and Alyson Provax—will create public audio and visual installations "experienced throughout the city of Seattle"; find the maps of the exhibitions at Mount Analogue. RICH SMITH
Closing Thursday

5. Reflections of Our Ancestors: Lillian Pitt and Dan Friday
Lillian Pitt, a Warm Springs/Wasco/Yakama elder, and Dan Friday, a Lummi glassblower, collaborated on these fragile and allusive bowl and basket forms. Pitt's knowledge of Columbia River Gorge symbology, including now-lost petroglyph imagery that dates back thousands of years, is imprinted on Friday's glass in vivid colors. The effect can be apparently abstract—and ravishingly so—as in Firelight, a cylindrical vase with gold and blue freckles and dancing light lines. Other pieces, like She Who Watches and Life Forms of the Columbia River, evoke ancient depictions of spirits, animals, and humans. These works of art mourn and celebrate Native heritage destroyed by the Dalles and John Day dams on the Columbia River, showing us some of what's been lost. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Thursday

6. Robert Hutchison: Memory Houses
For Robert Hutchison, architecture reflects the course of life and death through "typologies such as dwelling, chapel, lighthouse, and memorial." This view resulted from attempts at communication with his father, who had dementia during the last phase of his life: Hutchison designed a chapel to accompany the winery—also never realized—that he and his dad had once designed. The intricate models and drawings on display here, subtitled "Nine Allegorical Works of Architecture" may not be overtly emotional works of art, but the story behind them emphasizes the love and melancholy behind their construction. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Thursday

TUESDAY-FRIDAY

ART

7. Ryan Molenkamp
Ryan Molenkamp's lovely large-scale acrylic landscapes lend abstract textures and saturated colors to the geography of the Northwest.
Closing Friday

TUESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

8. Jiro Yonezawa, Ann Wolff
Jiro Yonezawa crafts sculptures out of woven metal, thread, and bamboo that succeed in evoking folk craft and conceptualism. Ann Wolff is a German-born, Sweden-based sculptor and studio glass artist whose work has been exhibited all over the world.
Closing Saturday

9. Rufino Tamayo: Selected Etchings
Mexican painter and printmaker Rufino del Carmen Arellanes Tamayo, whose work spanned the 20th century, drew on abstract trends, indigenous art, figurative traditions, and European surrealism. His stint as head of the Department of Ethnographic Drawing at the Museo Nacional de Arqueología deepened his interest in pre-Columbian visual traditions. An anti-revolutionary, unlike other Mexican artists of his generation, Tamayo was discouraged both by the disregard of his more political contemporaries and by racist attitudes toward indigenous-descended artists, and as a young man left his home for New York and then Paris. Eventually, though, he won worldwide recognition and acclaim from intellectuals like Octavio Paz, and there is now a contemporary art museum named after him in Mexico City. This is a vital opportunity to discover the work of a major 20th-century artist. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Saturday

10. Tim Cross
Tim Cross fashions elegant, canvas-filling floral designs whose intricacy induces calm and contemplation.
Closing Saturday

11. Tony Fitzpatrick: Selected Etchings
This iconographic art by the boxer Tony Fitzpatrick combines typogragraphy, animal images, and tattoo-inspired symbols in "etchings, lithographs and collages." His works dispense with perspective and realism in favor of bold graphics in webs of related images. Recommended for lovers of cartoon and comics aesthetics.
Closing Saturday

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

12. Ko Kirk Yamahira
Seattle artist (by way of London, Tokyo, and LA) Ko Kirk Yamahira delicately dissects canvas in a play on the distinctions between two- and three-dimensional art forms and an exploration of color and texture.
Closing Sunday

FESTIVALS

13. Seattle International Film Festival 2018
The 44th annual Seattle International Film Festival is the largest film festival in the United States, with more than 400 films (spread over 25 days) watched by around 150,000 people. It's impressively grand and one of the most exciting and widely attended arts events Seattle has to offer. Highlights this year include L'inferno with a live score by My Goodness and Sorry to Bother You, musician Boots Riley's debut about a black telemarketer (Lakeith Stanfield) who discovers he has a magical power.

FILM

14. SIFF VR Zone
For the first time, SIFF has set up an interactive zone where you can experience 360-degree storytelling from around the world, including Greenland Melting by the award-winning Nonny de la Peña and Catherine Upin, a selection of shorts from Senegal and Kenya, Posies by Seattle-based VR artists, and more. Book yourself a time slot and head in.

PERFORMANCE

15. Mac Beth
An adaptation of the Shakespeare play that dare not speak its name inside a theater, Erica Schmidt’s reimagining grows out of high-school students discovering the text after school and gradually coming to inhabit the characters, language, and grisly thematic deathscape. Macbeth is all about the toxicity of ambition, a moral framework that is always valuable to revisit. It’s also rare among Shakespeare's plays in that the female lead is actually the best part in the whole show by a mile. It’s intriguing to think of what an all-female cast will make of both the work itself and the act of claiming it. SEAN NELSON

WEDNESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

16. Burgers & Brews at Maslow's
On the last Wednesday of each month, FareStart's restaurant Maslow's will feature two new burger specials not on their regular menu accompanied by two beers from their brewery partner of the month. Wash down a burger with a cold brew and support FareStart's mission to provide "a community that transforms lives by empowering homeless and disadvantaged men, women, and families to achieve self-sufficiency through life skills, job training and employment in the food service industry.”

17. Savage Wine!
Bar Ferd'nand will put a spotlight on wild, yeasty, funky wines grown naturally with minimal intervention: the "juice fermented by the wild yeasts in the air" and its "agriculturally obsessed farmers and growers" to "express its authentic and true form."

READINGS & TALKS

18. Histories of the Central District and What We'll Build Next
Hear about the history of the historically highly diverse Central District, once home to Seattle's Jewish community and later a concentration of African American residents (because of redlining and other racist practices—we're sure you'll get more detail on that at the talk). There'll also be talk about what's in store for this wonderful—but gentrifying—neighborhood.

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

19. Kelly Bjork: Gentle Cravings
Kelly Bjork begins her domestic portraits by going into her friends' homes and photographing them with their everyday surroundings. She then translates these photographs into dense interior worlds of floral patterns, blocks of color, and great leafy shapes. Her figures are simplified into a playful, distinctive style with an illustrator's eye for detail. We see them lounging, hugging, and sometimes even engaged in physical acts of love; the warmth of emotion translating into a vibrant palette of primary colors, cool pastels, and gridded contrasts. Bjork is the cofounder of stationery company Pilgrim Paper, and it's easy to see how her charming images translate into handmade cards and other tokens of affection. EMILY POTHAST
Closing Saturday

20. Maïmouna Guerresi: Aisha in Wonderland
The figures in Maïmouna Guerresi's photographs are tapered and elongated, stretching heavenward like icons. Their bodies are veiled with long, flowing robes, often incorporating sculptural components that give them a stylized, geometric quality. Sometimes they are anchored to the ground as though they are growing out of it. Other times they appear to levitate. Born into a Catholic family in Italy, Guerresi later converted to a mystical, Sufi-oriented school of Islam and currently lives in Dakar, Senegal. Like her personal and spiritual history, her images transcend psychological, cultural, and political borders and boundaries. Wherever the body goes, it remains a sacred site. EMILY POTHAST
Closing Saturday

21. Matt Sellars: Parallax
Matt Sellars, a long-established PNW artist and former Seattle University resident artist, has exhibited painted sculptures carved from poplar, maple, and cherry. This show is made of recycled materials from a previous group exhibition, Fun. No Fun., and deals with discrepancies of perception. Says Sellars: "Parallax is the thought that an object viewed from multiple locations can appear differently from each perspective. I think that this applies not just to geography but also events in time or perceptions versus reality."
Closing Saturday

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

22. Le Carnaval Des Animaux
This group show features work by diverse artists inspired by the animal world, including pieces by accomplished surrealists and hyperrealists like Peter Ferguson, Travis Louie, Josie Morway, Scott Musgrove, Kari-Lise Alexander, Lola, Jim Blanchard, Jessica McCourt, and others.
Closing Sunday

PERFORMANCE

23. Goldie, Max and Milk
A single lesbian mother living on a shoestring budget resorts to the services of an Orthodox Jewish lactation expert in Karen Hartman's sharp comedy.

THURSDAY

FOOD & DRINK

24. Focus Menu: Beefsteak
At this ultra-carnal, all-you-can-eat event, Eric Rivera's addo pop-up will riff on the early 1900s concept of the "beefsteak" dinner, "a blue collar dinner meant to have people in large groups eat with reckless abandon." They advise, "Come hungry for the meats. Keeping with tradition we will be eating with our hands, socializing, and engaging in the meat sweats."

THURSDAY-FRIDAY

COMEDY

25. 8 to 6
In a cathartic improv show, three women in the workplace take revenge on their awful chauvinist boss according to your suggestions.

PERFORMANCE

26. Puddles Pity Party
The extremely popular "sad clown with the golden voice" presents his downcast live production featuring a mopey clown, absurdism, and some laughs.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

ART

27. Aaron Brady: The Color of Breathing
Aaron Brady's ghostly style lends itself to this work addressing "collective asphyxiation caused by our toxic environment."
Closing Saturday

28. Gosha Levochkin: Overworshipped
In this series, Gosha Levochkin features string-cheese-like characters with big boots, tall hats, and wide eyes who find themselves in inexplicable predicaments. New York–based, Moscow-born Levochkin paints them in gouache and watercolor, following the ligne clair (Tintin) tradition with bold colors, even lines, and no hatching. They evoke classic 2-D animation (Levochkin worked in a Korean animation studio for seven years), outsider art, and surrealism. The pictures seem like panels in a never-ending comic book, or stills from a maniacal Nickelodeon cartoon that probably shouldn't be shown to kids. In one, a stringy-person takes a selfie with a noose around its shapeless neck, rump, pertly out-thrust, as a tiny alien rides its back. It sounds like satire, but the effect is even weirder, as if whimsical imaginary friends from childhood had come of age in a hellscape. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Saturday

29. in a split second (it happened.)
There is a stretch of beach in Key West, Florida, that contains an African cemetery with roots in the transatlantic slave trade, an AIDS Memorial, and a sculptural lectern dedicated to a local philanthropist. In Monument a Surface, Seattle University's first High Resolution Media Artist-in-Residence, Dan Paz, uses photography, sculpture, video, and print to analyze the stories told by these landmarks. Like Paz, artists Danny Jauregui and Elise Rasmussen use multiple mediums to produce and present original research. Jauregui focuses on the erasure of queer bathhouse culture in Los Angeles, while Elise Rasmussen visits two sites related to the life and untimely death of artist Ana Mendieta. EMILY POTHAST
Opening Thursday

30. Interregnum
The word "interregnum" refers to the chaotic period between two regimes. The Scottish/American Yuck 'n Yum zine collective, which stopped publishing its quarterly in 2013, returns to release a Zine Compendium and to spotlight artists "currently navigating this strange new world and trying to make sense" of turmoil across nations. Alongside the release, the magazine—represented by Morgan Cahn, Ben Robinson, and Alex Tobin—has chosen 10 multimedia artists to reflect upon Brexit, Trump, and other upheavals both personal and global. Darren Banks, Greer Pester, O.B. De Alessi, Thomas Moore, Valerie Norris and Lada Wilson, Holger Mohaupt, Janie Nicoll, Kirsty McKeown, and Lizz Brady will offer diverse pieces inspired by robots, linguistics, myths, newspapers, gender roles, and queerdom. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Saturday

31. Iole Alessandrini: Your Own Halo
Artist Alessandrini's "printable halo" project in the back gallery is an exploration of the sacred aura and the difference between saintly beings and ordinary people. It asks the question: "What if we were a byte away from materializing the spirit?"
Closing Saturday

PERFORMANCE

32. 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche
In this comedy by Evan Linder and Andrew Hobgood, performed by the Fantastic.Z company, the widow members of the Susan B. Anthony Society for the Sisters of Gertrude Stein have to hide out in a bomb shelter when the Russians attack in 1956.

33. Welcome to Arroyo's
Intiman emerging artist Jay O'Leary makes her directorial debut with Kristoffer Diaz's hiphop-inflected comedy about a Puerto Rican family in New York dealing with the grief of losing a mother. The action is set in a Lower East Side lounge, where two DJs mix and remix the story in front of the audience. One of my favorite new-to-Seattle (but straight from the Bronx) performers, Naa Akua, plays a major role in the show, so keep your eye on her. Otherwise, the director wants you to know that the play is about "the vital need to truly understand those who are parched for visibility and love." RICH SMITH

FRIDAY

ART

34. For Charleena: Amplifying Black Womxn's Voices
Black womxn will lead the community in remembrance of Charleena Lyles, who was shot by police last year, in a poetry/art/music/fashion/storytelling show headed by artist Wynn Adele and Youngstown representative Erika Bell. Charleena's sister Monika and other family members will be there.

FOOD & DRINK

35. GLITTERis Pride Ale Release Party
As the official beer sponsors of Seattle Pride, Elysian brewers concocted a special fruit-forward ale by adding blackberry and raspberry purees to the fermenter. Sip it for yourself while you dance to beats from KEXP DJ Riz Rollins.

36. Stem: Science Uncorked
Explore the science behind your favorite fermented grape beverage at this after-hours museum field trip for adults, where you can sip as many samples as you can handle. Talk to 14 Washington wineries, like DeLille Cellars and Three of Cups Winery, and learn all about their processes, from vine to glass. Besides, when else will you get a chance to traipse through the exhibits of the Science Center with a wine buzz on? JULIANNE BELL

PERFORMANCE

37. August Strindberg's 'Miss Julie'
Before Rob Melrose's adaptation of August Strindberg's famously misanthropic 1888 play Miss Julie premiers at San Francisco's Cutting Ball Theater, hear a staged reading led by Bay Area artists Ariel Craft and Megan Cohen.

READINGS & TALKS

38. Cascadia Mag’s Almost Summer Reading
Cascadia literary magazine will host its first-ever public event with readings by tip-top local talent: Donna Miscolta (Hola and Good-bye) and Anca Szilagyi (Daughters of the Air) with new fiction, Michael Schmeltzer and Montreux Rotholt with poetry, Niki Stojnic and Matt Stangel with news stories, and photography by Daniel Hawkins.

39. Temple Grandin: Calling All Minds
Temple Grandin is best known for her work as an animal behaviorist and inventor. She is the creator of the “squeeze machine,” a device that helps calm people with autism. In her new book, Calling All Minds: How to Think and Create Like an Inventor, Grandin turns her to attention to other people's innovations, from Velcro to television to things that float, fly, and confound the mind. But this book is no mere history: Grandin also gives blueprints for readers to create things on their own—it is part memoir, part encyclopedia, and part how-to. Grandin will be reading from her book and hopefully talking about some inventions of her own. KATIE HERZOG

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

ART

40. Troy Gua: Immaculate Disasters
In 2011, Stranger critic Jen Graves wrote an article on Troy Gua that the artist then incorporated into a pee-themed installation called Pissing Contest. Gua usually plays with slick pop-culture surfaces and symbols as well as found materials, with an eye (and possibly a middle finger) to art history and criticism. For this show, he has drawn on something more peaceful: the vistas of the Northwest filtered through the sensibilities of ukiyo-e, the predominant form of Japanese figurative art from the 17th to 19th centuries. Gua borrows the aesthetic of balanced, simplified landscapes and adds his own glowering colors. By his own account, his aim to depict utopias "took an apocalyptic bend" over the course of the project—he now seems less preoccupied with pop than with the frightening beauty of potential planetary doom. JOULE ZELMAN
Opening Friday

PERFORMANCE

41. Hunchback of Notre Dame
Says my source: "This musical, while it has all of the goods from the Disney movie, is not an adaptation of the Disney film. It stays more true to the book and is darker than the Disney film. This will be directed by Glenn Casale, who directed Little Mermaid for us." God, The Little Mermaid at the 5th was so good. In 2016 in Sacramento, deaf actor John McGinty played the role of Quasimodo—which was "the first time a deaf actor has played the role," according to the Sacramento Bee. Quasimodo is deaf. Deaf actor Joshua M. Castille will play the role in Seattle. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

42. Love & Ballet
This quartet of performances is going to have you swooning and bawling while thinking of her or him or them in the corner of your mind. With music by Sufjan Stevens, Justin Peck's Year of the Rabbit will bring a burst of cheerleader-like joy. But everything else is going to melt your heart. Benjamin Millepied's Appassionata returns with Beethoven's stormy score and its breathtaking, crazy-in-love-right-now pas de deux. Christopher Wheeldon's aquatic love songs, After the Rain pas de deux and Tide Harmonic, will round out the evening nicely. There's a moment in After the Rain where the female dancer does Kate Winslet's Titanic thing while balancing on the thigh of the male dancer, which is a feat worth the price of admission. And to add to this pile of feelings, this run of shows will be the penultimate time you'll get to see Karel Cruz leap across the stage like a gazelle. He'll retire from Pacific Northwest Ballet at the Season Encore Performance on June 10, after performing the pas de deux from Alexei Ratmansky's Don Quixote with his wife, principal dancer Lindsi Dec. <3 RICH SMITH

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

ART

43. Alex Katz: A Life in Print
Alex Katz was born to Russian Jewish immigrants in Brooklyn in 1927 and studied under Morris Kantor at Cooper Union, only focusing on painting from life once he graduated from college. He went on to become one of the most important artists in the figurative mode of the 20th century. The "Selections from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation" include his matte, shadow-less portraits of New York poets and life-size depictions of bathers at the sea.
Opening Friday

44. Femail: AMPM (2.0)
FEMAIL is Camilla Carper and Janelle Abbott, who collaborate on fashion pieces by mail from their homes in Seattle and Los Angeles. They send their work back and forth, each designer welcome to add to (or subtract from) the garment. In this way, the clothing bears the imprint of their friendship and correspondence. This will be their first museum exhibition, developed out of an installation they premiered at the Out of Sight arts festival. Personal mementos and clothing are incorporated into art, tapestry, furniture, and other crafts.
Opening Friday

FOOD & DRINK

45. Bite of Greece
At this free festival, stuff yourself with gyros, slow-roasted lamb sandwiches, chicken souvlaki, Greek salad, tiropita (filo pastry dough brushed with butter and layered with egg and feta cheese), and other authentic Mediterranean delights prepared by the community of the Greek Orthodox Church of the Assumption. There will also be dancing, music, and special performances. JULIANNE BELL

PERFORMANCE

46. Britt Karhoff: STILL WONDER FULL
Seattle dancer Britt Karhoff performed an early version of this solo performance in 2016 at On the Boards for Northwest New Works, and it looked extremely promising. Things have likely changed and developed, but Karhoff's undeniable athleticism and ability to incorporate a good mix of subtle and slapstick humor into her innovative choreography has likely stayed the same. According to press materials, the piece is generally a "reflection on the complexity and spectacle of loss," which gets me pumped for some summertime (summertime) sadness. RICH SMITH

47. My Fair Lady
Douchey professor Henry Higgins will once again turn Cockney flower seller Eliza Doolittle into a lady—but find her more than he can handle—in this staging of the Lerner and Loewe musical.

SATURDAY

COMEDY

48. ASSBUTTS (Amazing Super Spectacular Bold Unscripted Terrific Theater Show)
Some of the city's finest performers will collaborate on instantaneous comedy scenes, with a different lineup every Saturday, in Mandy Price's ASSBUTTS. Don't be surprised if it gets a little vulgar. Or extremely vulgar.

49. Ten Percent Luck
Two improv groups (hosts Yeah Okay plus the witty and strange Death and Taxes) will do their comedic thang with instruction and suggestions by a featured stand-up comic (Dan O'Connell).

FESTIVALS

50. 2nd Annual Rosé Experience
A week before Rosé Day, taste varieties of pretty-in-pink wine from 25 different wineries, including Charles Smith's CasaSmith ViNO Rosé, K Vintners Rosé, and Charles & Charles Rosé, and take in tunes from indie rocker Lucy Dacus and indie folk rock five-piece Vetiver.

51. FOCS Arts Fest 2018
This arts festival is free for low-income families and will bring you diverse genres of music and performance by Women's Steel Pan Project and Indigenous Sisters of Resistance, as well as two Totem Star artists, Anna Banana of Massive Monkees, Thione Diop, FICA Brasilian Capoeira, Dora Oliveira, Bailadores de Bronce, AU Collective, and Little Brown Girls' Club. DJ Reverend Dollars and Carlynn Newhouse will host.

FOOD & DRINK

52. Chef Fest: The Main Event
Witness six Washington chefs duke it out in a culinary battle (and sample their efforts) in this fundraiser for the Icicle Creek Center for the Arts, followed by desserts.

53. FogRose Grand Opening
Liquid nitrogen ice cream boutique FogRose will celebrate its grand opening. Guests who post a picture at the event with the hashtag #fogrosebellevue will get a free ice cream on their next visit.

54. Summer of Rosé
To celebrate opening their garden and patio for the season, Bottlehouse will have over 25 wines in pretty "summer sunset hues" from all over the world to sample. There will also be live music, raffles, VIP giveaways, and special food menu options.

PERFORMANCE

55. Arthaus 4.0 Finale ft. Jasmine Masters
The weirdo drag battles at Art Haus produce the kind of shockingly brilliant, deeply strange, and delightfully incomprehensible performances that I imagine when old timers talk about the off-the-wall art people used to make before the first wave of tech money started "ruining" everything. Go and have fun at something for once in your life. RICH SMITH

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

ART

56. Artvocacy: Refugee Art Exhibit
Founded in 1988 in a decommissioned Trailways bus terminal in Westlake, Art/Not Terminal spent 25 years in a space owned by Capitol Hill Housing before establishing its current home at Seattle Center in July 2016. Completely volunteer staffed and sustained, the gallery's mission is to facilitate accessibility for both artists and patrons through non-juried exhibitions in which anyone—regardless of artistic training or sales history—is invited to hang artwork in a professional context. Each month, A/NT partners with a different nonprofit organization to create a context aimed at the cultivation of physical, mental, and emotional well-being through self-expression. In June, the gallery will be devoted to art that reflects the refugee experience. EMILY POTHAST
Opening Saturday

57. United Indians Art Markets
Peruse affordable jewelry, wood goods, drums, clothing, and more by Native artists.

FILM

58. Diwa Filipino Film Showcase 2018
These short films reveals queer stories, love stories, painted stories, Saudi stories, and more by Filipino and Filipino diaspora creators.

PERFORMANCE

59. O+E: A Journey to Hell and Back
For the sake of keeping up with the kids and bringing opera to the people, every year Seattle Opera does an English-language chamber piece that's normally cooler and more modern than the stuff they run on the main stage, and every year it's good. This time they're producing an all-women version of Christoph Gluck's Orpheus and Eurydice, a retelling of the famous Greek myth about trust and faithfulness that birthed the great tradition of lyric poetry in the West. In Gluck's version, O hallucinates at her dying wife E's bedside as A (Amore) intervenes to save the wounded woman's life. Stage director Kelly Kitchens, who is no stranger to all-women productions in Seattle, says in press materials that she chose a Sapphic interpretation of Orpheus and Eurydice "because love is universal and this story belongs to all of us." RICH SMITH

SUNDAY

COMEDY

60. Musical: Stephen Sondheim Improvised
Using audience suggestions, the cast will improvise a brand-new musical based on the work of Stephen Sondheim, the genius responsible for Into the Woods, Sweeney Todd, Company, Sunday in the Park with George, and more. It's an almost insanely ambitious concept to try to match Sondheim off-the-cuff, so check out UP performers using every ounce of their wits and skills.

FOOD & DRINK

61. Three Sacks Full Pop-Up
Driven by his curiosity to discover what a “real carrot” tasted like, chef Michael Tsai took a sabbatical to work on Green String Farm in California and eventually moved to the Snoqualmie River Valley’s Goose and Gander Farm, where he works now. He will bring that same farm-to-table sensibility to Three Sacks Full, his pop-up with sommelier and partner Matthew Curtis, who favors wine pairings from smaller producers and family-run wineries. Naturally, their menus are locally sourced, ever-changing, and hyper-seasonal. Dishes for April's dinner included black-eyed-pea dumplings; a mushroom, wild ramp, and fiddlehead fern ragout; and rhubarb and poppy-seed buckle cake with whipped cream, with Frankie & Jo's plant-based ice cream for dessert, and June's dinner promises to be just as seasonally inspired. JULIANNE BELL

PERFORMANCE

62. SailorHank presents: The Lost Queens
SailorHank Payne's drag homage to the classic '80s vampire flick (starring Butylene O'Kipple, RainBowGore Cake, Jackie Hell, Harlotte O'Scara, and Josh Hartvigson) follows the adventures of two teenage sisters as they discover a group of blood-sucking queens on Capitol Hill.

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