The streets will fill with rainbow flags once again as thousands of LGBTQ+ Seattleites and allies gather for the 44th annual Pride Parade on June 24. Kingmon Creative

You can always find the latest Seattle events on our Things To Do calendar, and as the first month of summer, June promises tons of options. To make sure you don’t lose track of the biggest ones, we’ve compiled 175 major arts, music, food, and cultural events you need to know about, including Pride celebrations throughout the month and Father’s Day events. You’ll also find everything from film series (like Movies at Marymoor Park) and music festivals (like Upstream Music Fest + Summit) to boozy happenings (like Negroni Week and the Washington Brewer’s Festival) and performances (like the NW New Works Festival), and from sports events (like the Rock and Roll Half Marathon and the Seattle Night Ride) to summer solstice events (like the Fremont Solstice Fair). If all of that isn't enough, you can also look ahead to the rest of this year's big events.

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.

JUNE 1

ART

1. For Charleena: Amplifying Black Womxn's Voices
Black womxn will lead the community in remembrance of Charleena Lyles, who was shot by police last year, in a poetry/art/music/fashion/storytelling show headed by artist Wynn Adele and Youngstown representative Erika Bell. Charleena's sister Monika and other family members will be there.

FOOD & DRINK

2. Stem: Science Uncorked
Explore the science behind your favorite fermented grape beverage at this after-hours museum field trip for adults, where you can sip as many samples as you can handle. Talk to 14 Washington wineries, like DeLille Cellars and Three of Cups Winery, and learn all about their processes, from vine to glass. Besides, when else will you get a chance to traipse through the exhibits of the Science Center with a wine buzz on? JULIANNE BELL

MUSIC

3. Todd Rundgren's Utopia
Utopia, like Todd Rundgren, the man in charge, covered a lot of ground. Prog rock, arena glitz, sidelong songs, concept albums, Egyptology, Beatles homages, a pyramid and golden Sphinx that threatened to squash the band onstage, a spinning drum kit fashioned from a motorcycle chassis that threatened to throw drummer John “Willie” Wilcox to the floor. Utopia probably left the props in storage, but they’re back with three-fourths of the classic lineup, Rundgren and Wilcox included. And frankly, given the wicked state of the planet, we could use some (wary) optimists telling us that this is one world, our world, everybody’s world. ANDREW HAMLIN

4. Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo are rightly associated with Hoboken through their alliances with WFMU and Maxwell's—including their beloved Hanukkah shows—but they've left their mark on Seattle, too. Aside from decades of concerts, they played the last in-store at Queen Anne's Easy Street Records (it was so crowded that I couldn’t even see the band). They opened with a version of gospel standard "The Last Time," and it couldn't have been more perfect. That space now houses a Chase Bank branch, while Yo La Tengo have just released their 15th album, There's a Riot Going On, a gorgeous excursion into jazz-infused dream pop. KATHY FENNESSY

PERFORMANCE

5. Puddles Pity Party
The extremely popular "sad clown with the golden voice" presents his downcast live production featuring a mopey clown, absurdism, and some laughs.

READINGS & TALKS

6. Temple Grandin: Calling All Minds
Temple Grandin is best known for her work as an animal behaviorist and inventor. She is the creator of the “squeeze machine,” a device that helps calm people with autism. In her new book, Calling All Minds: How to Think and Create Like an Inventor, Grandin turns her to attention to other people's innovations, from Velcro to television to things that float, fly, and confound the mind. But this book is no mere history: Grandin also gives blueprints for readers to create things on their own—it is part memoir, part encyclopedia, and part how-to. Grandin will be reading from her book and hopefully talking about some inventions of her own. KATIE HERZOG

JUNE 1-3

FESTIVALS

7. Seaprog 2018
Progressive rock refuses to die! That’s right, folks: Dennis Rea and company’s Seaprog fest offers three days of all the key-change blizzards, tempo-shift typhoons, arcane meters, in-your-face-down-your-esophagus soloing, and hymns to the ethereal a solitary consciousness could possibly snork. Seaprog 2018 artists will include Bubblemath, Cantrip, Moraine, Cheer-Accident, Clearly Beloved, Faun Fables, Free Salamander Exhibit, Himiko Cloud, Inner Ear Brigade, Marching Mind, Ocelot Omelet, Spontaneous Rex, and The Mercury Tree. ANDREW HAMLIN

FOOD & DRINK

8. Bite of Greece
At this free festival, stuff yourself with gyros, slow-roasted lamb sandwiches, chicken souvlaki, Greek salad, tiropita (filo pastry dough brushed with butter and layered with egg and feta cheese), and other authentic Mediterranean delights prepared by the community of the Greek Orthodox Church of the Assumption. There will also be dancing, music, and special performances. JULIANNE BELL

MUSIC

9. HONK! Fest West
This family-oriented festival gets you in on the brass, percussion, and street band "global renaissance." Twenty-five or more bands will jam in streets and parks around Seattle as they celebrate this democratic and ebullient musical genre.

10. Upstream Music Fest + Summit
There are two ways of looking at Upstream, a music festival unrivaled in its ability to spur discussion (or just hand-wringing) about the politics and culture in Seattle. On the one hand, it’s another financially inaccessible music fest, this time bankrolled by a tech billionaire. On the other hand, it’s commendably ambitious, seems to operate in good faith, and results in a whole bunch of local artists getting Paul Allen’s money. In the fest’s second year, its top-of-the-lineup programming offers much of the same as the first time around: second-tier pop stars (Miguel), music fest veteran indie (Flaming Lips, Little Dragon), and something for the middle-aged rocker set (Jawbreaker). ANDREW GOSPE

JUNE 1-10

FESTIVALS

11. Seattle International Film Festival 2018
The 44th annual Seattle International Film Festival is the largest film festival in the United States, with more than 400 films (spread over 25 days) watched by around 150,000 people. It's impressively grand and one of the most exciting and widely attended arts events Seattle has to offer. During the last 10 days of the festival, don't miss the centerpiece (Sorry to Bother You), A Tribute to Ethan Hawke, and the closing gala (Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot. If you miss out, check out the Best of SIFF screenings from June 15–21.

PERFORMANCE

12. Love & Ballet
This quartet of performances is going to have you swooning and bawling while thinking of her or him or them in the corner of your mind. With music by Sufjan Stevens, Justin Peck's Year of the Rabbit will bring a burst of cheerleader-like joy. But everything else is going to melt your heart. Benjamin Millepied's Appassionata returns with Beethoven's stormy score and its breathtaking, crazy-in-love-right-now pas de deux. Christopher Wheeldon's aquatic love songs, After the Rain pas de deux and Tide Harmonic, will round out the evening nicely. There's a moment in After the Rain where the female dancer does Kate Winslet's Titanic thing while balancing on the thigh of the male dancer, which is a feat worth the price of admission. And to add to this pile of feelings, this run of shows will be the penultimate time you'll get to see Karel Cruz leap across the stage like a gazelle. He'll retire from Pacific Northwest Ballet at the Season Encore Performance on June 10, after performing the pas de deux from Alexei Ratmansky's Don Quixote with his wife, principal dancer Lindsi Dec. <3 RICH SMITH

JUNE 1-23

COMEDY

13. Laugh-Off
Once again, a last-comic-standing battle will rage. About 30 comedians will start the contest, and one will finish a champion. Celebrity judges and audience reactions will determine who passes the preliminaries and who becomes a finalist.

JUNE 1-24

PERFORMANCE

14. Hunchback of Notre Dame
Says my source: "This musical, while it has all of the goods from the Disney movie, is not an adaptation of the Disney film. It stays more true to the book and is darker than the Disney film. This will be directed by Glenn Casale, who directed Little Mermaid for us." God, The Little Mermaid at the 5th was so good. In 2016 in Sacramento, deaf actor John McGinty played the role of Quasimodo—which was "the first time a deaf actor has played the role," according to the Sacramento Bee. Quasimodo is deaf. Deaf actor Joshua M. Castille will play the role in Seattle. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

JUNE 1-OCT 14

ART

15. Alex Katz: A Life in Print
Alex Katz was born to Russian Jewish immigrants in Brooklyn in 1927 and studied under Morris Kantor at Cooper Union, only focusing on painting from life after he graduated from college. He went on to become one of the most important artists in the figurative mode of the 20th century. The "Selections from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation" include his matte, shadow-less portraits of New York poets and life-size depictions of bathers at the sea.

JUNE 2

ART

16. 12 Hour Comic Challenge
Create a 12-page comic in 12 hours—they'll provide coffee, tea, pastries, lunch, dinner, and limited supplies. Original stories only; no adaptations.

17. Olympia Comics Festival
Love alternative comics? You may want to make the trip to this long-running festival, which emphasizes "comics as an art form" and "creator-owned work." This year, meet Farel Dalrymple (The Wrenchies, It Will All Hurt, Pop Gun War) and Shannon Wheeler (New Yorker cartoons, including Too Much Coffee Man, Shit My President Says).

FOOD & DRINK

18. 2nd Annual Rosé Experience
A week before Rosé Day, taste varieties of pretty-in-pink wine from 25 different wineries, including Charles Smith's CasaSmith ViNO Rosé, K Vintners Rosé, and Charles & Charles Rosé, and take in tunes from indie rocker Lucy Dacus and indie folk rock five-piece Vetiver.

MUSIC

19. Brian McKnight
Walking that line between smooth as hell and the cheesiest ever, multi-instrumentalist and triple-platinum recording artist Brian McKnight emerges from modern music history as a mascot for when '90s R&B hit the apex of its marketability. Expect beloved hits and deep cuts from his catalog of 15 albums.

20. Celtic Woman
Celtic Woman, a heavily lauded group of Emerald Isle faerie queens, will perform folksy classics and traditional Irish music on their Homecoming Tour.

21. Eels, That 1 Guy
Mayhap you know Cali indie-rock band Eels from radio hit “Novocaine for the Soul,” or you’re familiar with the sweetly poignant heartache of “That Look You Give That Guy”—currently their most played song on Spotify. Whatever the case, you need to know the title track of The Deconstruction, a 2018 studio LP that came after the first real break that Eels’ leader Mark Oliver Everett took from making music in more than 25 years. The song launches the album with eerie thematic minor chords picked on guitar, dramatic swells of strings backing easy-rocking rhythms, as Everett croons about breaking apart and putting himself back together again. Slinky, stealthy, psych-folk follow-up “Bone Dry” is pretty fantastic, too, driven by Everett’s earnest, raspy drawl. You’ll surely hear both on this tour, although I’m curious how many of the slower and more introspective numbers will make it onto the set list. LEILANI POLK

22. Liz Phair
Like many restless suburban kids in the pre-streaming era, Liz Phair got her start through four-track recordings sent to fanzines. She quickly broke from the pack with wise-beyond-her-years lyrics in the Laurel Canyon vein combined with a sexual frankness and mastery of profanity rare among folk-based singer-songwriters. The success of the Girly-Sound tapes led to Exile in Guyville, which set the alt-rock world on fire. Major label recordings, TV theme songs, and other projects followed, but Exile is Phair's masterpiece. It was great then, it's great now, and it'll be great as long as polyester brides walk the earth. KATHY FENNESSY

JUNE 2-10

PERFORMANCE

23. O+E: A Journey to Hell and Back
For the sake of keeping up with the kids and bringing opera to the people, every year Seattle Opera does an English-language chamber piece that's normally cooler and more modern than the stuff they run on the main stage, and every year it's good. This time they're producing an all-women version of Christoph Gluck's Orpheus and Eurydice, a retelling of the famous Greek myth about trust and faithfulness that birthed the great tradition of lyric poetry in the West. In Gluck's version, O hallucinates at her dying wife E's bedside as A (Amore) intervenes to save the wounded woman's life. Stage director Kelly Kitchens, who is no stranger to all-women productions in Seattle, says in press materials that she chose a Sapphic interpretation of Orpheus and Eurydice "because love is universal and this story belongs to all of us." RICH SMITH

JUNE 3

MUSIC

24. Bhad Bhabie, Asian Doll
The "Cash me ousside how bout dah" girl from Dr. Phil has, for whatever reason, decided that rap was the way to go for her career trajectory. She'll be joined on tour by actual rapper Asian Doll.

SPORTS & RECREATION

25. Race for the Cure
Raise awareness of breast cancer, help fund its research, and honor those affected at the Susan G. Komen Puget Sound Race for the Cure.

JUNE 4

MUSIC

26. Okkervil River, Benjamin Lazar Davis
Okkervil River’s third album, Black Sheep Boy, may not cut as deep as Big Star’s Third with its exposed-nerve laments about love, death, and love as death—but it comes close. Front man Will Sheff holds nothing back on the Austin sextet’s masterpiece, though what impresses some may merely exhaust others (one critic dubbed them “Overkill River”). It’s an understandable reaction, but for those drawn to Sheff’s destabilizing lyrics—“sometimes the blood from real cuts feels real nice”—and campfire-meets-concert-hall aesthetic, this show promises to be as revelatory as the new, extended version of the record with bonus tracks and covers of influences from Leadbelly to the Louvin Brothers. KATHY FENNESSY

READINGS & TALKS

27. Ken Jennings: Planet Funny
Planet Funny: How Comedy Took Over Our Culture examines the pervasive and sometimes pernicious degree to which comedy has evolved from an entertainment category into the dominant mode of public and private expression among humans. The insights are sharp, witty, and sometimes startling. Jennings is equally adept at citing Cicero and Allen Funt, at zooming in on the inflation of jokes-per-minute in the past 40 years of sitcoms or spinning out on the relationship between Twitter—with its weird split screen of casual cruelty humor and performed hypersensitivity—and the election of certain presidents. Like any honest book published in 2018, Planet Funny does ever so slightly make you want to jump off a bridge. The way only a good book can. Jennings is neither condemning nor celebrating, but his angle on the comedification of discourse has complex implications—particularly if you've spent a lifetime investing in the view of yourself as a funny person. SEAN NELSON

JUNE 4-10

FOOD & DRINK

28. Negroni Week 2018
The refreshingly bitter, glowing-crimson aperitif, made with equal parts gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth and garnished with an orange peel, is so beloved, it now has its own week. Bars all over Seattle—including Outlier, Liberty, Bar del Corso, Babirusa, and Ba Bar—will be shaking up their own variations of the ruby-red cocktail to benefit charitable organizations, such as Arbor Day Foundation, Little Free Library, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, PAWS, and Surfrider Foundation. If the concept of gulping Negronis to combat the world’s ills sounds too good to be true, you’re probably right: As Stranger food writer Angela Garbes wrote in 2016, “Started in 2013 by Campari and Imbibe magazine, Negroni Week is most definitely a marketing ploy benefitting a global corporation. Feel free to plot the overthrow of our corporate power regime as you throw back another Negroni.” JULIANNE BELL

JUNE 5

MUSIC

29. JoJo
Neo-R&B pop star JoJo is back on the town with her Mad Love tour in support of her latest album of the same name. DAVE SEGAL

30. Steely Dan, The Doobie Brothers
Maybe no classic rock act so deserves a modern reassessment as Steely Dan. The ostensibly square yacht rock band—composed of Donald Fagen, the late Walter Becker, and an army of intensely talented studio musicians—blended soft rock with advanced jazz theory. Never nerdy enough to be called progressive, never swaggering enough to make cock rock, Steely Dan were the sophisticated wallflowers of the 1970s, a dark mirror to the jocular Eagles. Underneath their über-geeky exterior lurked a dark, sarcastic, and cutting lyrical intellect. The sharp irony of, say, Father John Misty or even David Byrne has no precedent without Fagen singing “Deacon Blues.” The Doobie Brothers are playing, too. They sound similar but are less interesting. JOSEPH SCHAFER

PERFORMANCE

31. Crossdresser for Christ
RuPaul's Drag Race favorite Ginger Minj (aka the "Comedy Queen of the South") will bring her autobiographical musical comedy Crossdresser for Christ to Seattle for the first time. Join the "Comedy Queen of the South" as she recalls her "relig-ish" journey from her Floridian Southern Baptist upbringings—where she endured "hell and damnation shoved down her throat"—and her search for "alternative answers." (All of which will be expressed through song and dance, natch.)

JUNE 5 & 7

MUSIC

32. Social Distortion
Over the past 40 years, Social Distortion vocalist Mike Ness has become a sort of blue-collar hero, with his signature heart-on-sleeve, honest lyrics and rockabilly swagger acting as a style guide to many in Orange County's punk-rock circles. Instead of being known as the fastest or craziest in the scene, Ness crafted the band to be the catchiest, with his soulful howl being their calling card. Though they have only a few radio hits among their seven albums, the band has achieved an almost Morrissey-like cult status with fans who make Social D concerts seem like unofficial Grease-cosplay events. KEVIN DIERS

JUNE 6

MUSIC

33. James Taylor & His All-Star Band
Folksy Americana pop anthem leader James Taylor will bring his easy living sensibilities to KeyArena with his All-Star Band in tow. Our favorite bluesy boozy beauty Bonnie Raitt has unfortunately been removed from the docket due to recent health issues.

34. King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard, Amyl and the Sniffers
The Australian psych savants always deliver when you need a night of tingly acid rock crawling on your skin and throughout your nervous system. In the same garage-y genus as Ty Segall and Oh Sees, prolific rippers King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard have dropped 14 studio albums in six years. With a seven-piece polyphonic presence, their orgiastic shows are lush with 1970s levitation and act as an elevator to the 13th floor of your endorphins. Also hailing from the Courtney Barnett land down under, Amyl and the Sniffers will spike your adrenaline as they toss you around with their briny pub punk. ZACH FRIMMEL

JUNE 6-7

FILM

35. Jaws—In Concert
Plunge in again to the ne plus ultra of creature features in a whole new way: with the iconically ominous John Williams score played lived by the Seattle Symphony.

JUNE 6-17

PERFORMANCE

36. Les Misérables
Is there a better musical about poverty, resistance, and police overreach than Les Misérables? Is there a better song about unrequited love than “On My Own,” the number Eponine sings while walking through Paris? Is there a more vivid, sexed-up cheapskate than Thenardier? (Okay, maybe Trump. But at least Thenardier has a sense of humor about his awfulness.) Les Misérables is one of the undefeated musicals of our time. Yes, it’s a bit treacly, and yes, it’s very Christian, but it still works, and it’s more stirring as a live performance than as a movie. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

JUNE 6-JULY 1

PERFORMANCE

37. The Picture of Dorian Gray
Book-It Repertory Theatre will lend flesh and blood to an adaptation of Oscar Wilde's once-shocking, still creepy Victorian novel about a handsome but ruthless man whose debaucheries and degradations only cause his portrait, not his own body, to age. Chip Sherman (the Rep's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings) will star in this "gay suspense" play.

JUNE 7

FOOD & DRINK

38. Cafe Campagne Annual Drink Pink
Tucked away in Post Alley, legendary bistro Cafe Campagne has been serving up French comfort food since 1994. And for 14 years running, they’ve celebrated their annual "Drink Pink" event in said alley with a variety of seasonal rosé, so you can guzzle pink wine on their picturesque patio and pretend you’re in Paris. They'll have rosé by the glass and the bottle, as well as food available for purchase. JULIANNE BELL

MUSIC

39. Sugarland, Brandy Clark, Clare Bowen
Award-winning, chart-topping country duo Sugarland have been crisscrossing the country on their Still The Same arena tour. They'll be joined tonight by Brandy Clark and Clare Bowen.

JUNE 7-8

MUSIC

40. Lord Huron
LA’s Lord Huron have issued two albums of luminous folk pop that feels breezily effortless and expansive, their sweeping anthemic drive imbued with a Springsteenian/War on Drugs-like indie-rock appeal. Instrumentals are marked by cascading, Afrobeat-influenced guitar melodies and lush percussive textures, with an infusion of languid, salt-stained Cali sound qualities on 2015’s Strange Trails, while frontman Ben Schneider’s ethereal lead vocals soar over or intertwine with those of his bandmates to ascend in exquisite multi-voice chorales or stirring calls and cooing harmonies. LEILANI POLK

JUNE 7-10

FESTIVALS

41. Vashon Sheepdog Classic
This annual herding extravaganza is a good excuse to take the ferry to Vashon Island, and also a good excuse to watch athletic sheepdogs chase livestock around a field. They'll also have local fare, a fiber arts village, bagpipe performances, and more to keep you occupied when you're not watching the competition.

JUNE 7-23

PERFORMANCE

42. Seattle International Dance Festival
For 16 days, dancers from around the world (and some local stars) will perform in indoor and outdoor venues. Some events will be free and all-ages. In general, the focus is on innovation and diversity—expect to be inspired and occasionally unnerved.

JUNE 7-28

ART

43. Anastacia-Reneé: Poetry in a Time of Chaos
Seattle's Civic Poet seemingly has boundless reserves of energy: After publishing three books in one year, she's been performing at readings almost constantly. Now, she'll mark the end of her tenure with an installation, including her own work and a "blow-up interactive poem-environment" constructed in collaboration with Seattle Design Nerds. In addition, the gallery will host writing workshops, and the event will close with a party on June 30th for the second printings of Anastacia-Renee's (v.) and Sarah Galvin's Ugly Time (both published by Gramma Poetry, which shares the space).

JUNE 7-30

ART

44. Joan Miró: Etchings & Lithographs
The Catalan painter and sculptor Joan Miró, like Salvador Dalí and others in the surrealist movement, was galvanized by the theories of André Breton. Intrigued by the idea of plunging into the unconscious, he ditched his early investigations of realism, cubism, and naive art to play with geometric, organic, vividly colored forms in striking compositions. Miró hasn't had the same pop-culture impact as Dalí, but his body of work is less encumbered by his contemporary's dogmatism and attention-hogging. Here, you can see his lithographs, posters, and etchings. JOULE ZELMAN

JUNE 8

COMEDY

45. Lisa Lampanelli
Powerhouse comic Lisa Lampanelli, praised by big shots like Jim Carrey and Howard Stern for her biting and brutal style of "insult comedy," will inflict her stand-up on Seattle.

FILM

46. 'Hereditary' Opening
No one wants to divulge too much of Ari Aster's new movie, so we'll just say that it's about a terrible family secret that comes out after the death of an elusive matriarch. Everyone from the A.V. Club to Vanity Fair has called it traumatic and tragic, even downright "evil," and horror fans are stoked.

47. 'Won't You Be My Neighbor?' Opening
Remember how badly you miss Mr. Rogers as you watch this documentary about the TV host, Presbyterian minister, and public broadcasting champion's ethics and influence.

MUSIC

48. Tory Lanez, Guests
Toronto singer, rapper, and producer Tory Lanez started climbing the charts with his breakout single, "Luv." He'll be touring behind his most recent drop, Memories Don't Die.

JUNE 8-10

FESTIVALS

49. Northwest Pinball and Arcade Show
Whether you're a die-hard gamer or a casual player, go nuts by testing out over 400 pinball and arcade games for free. There will also be guest speakers from the industry, seminars on collecting, playing, and fixing games, pinball tournaments with prizes, and more.

JUNE 8-16

PERFORMANCE

50. Transfigurate
Transfigurate, the final performance in Whim W'Him's 2017–2018 season, will boast three new works by Danielle Agami (formerly of Batsheva), Pascal Touzeau (ex-Ballet Frankfurt), and, as always, Whim W'Him's artistic director Olivier Wevers.

JUNE 8-17

PERFORMANCE

51. NW New Works Festival
For two weekends every year in June, On the Boards transforms into an open studio for the most gifted theater-makers, dancers, and performance artists in the region. Some of the more promising works-in-progress this year include a new piece by hilarious Portland-based dancer Allie Hankins, a solo show about "a daughter’s quest to know her deceased mother and the plastic surgeon who killed her" by Seattle comedian Susan Lieu, an interrogation of the "Western gender binary" from the perspective of Yoruba deities by Seattle's Kiana Harris, a deep dive into "pleasure and shame" by Canada's Pam Tzeng, a weirde treatment of an old witch story by local production company The Horse in Motion, and a multimedia meditation on coincidence by Rainbow Fletcher. All performances are approximately twenty minutes long, and it's fun to try to figure out which of the shows is going to take the world by storm in the coming years. RICH SMITH

JUNE 8-JULY 8

PERFORMANCE

52. Until the Flood
To create this one-act solo show about the shooting of Michael Brown, theater-maker Dael Orlandersmith conducted hours of interviews with 60 to 80 citizens of Ferguson, Missouri. "I let them talk, I let them talk," Orlandersmith said in an interview to Milwaukee Rep. What emerged from those conversations is this collection of powerful recollections, one that ultimately demands the end of the slaughter of black men in the streets of St. Louis and everywhere else, and one that offers some practical solutions for how we might best accomplish that goal. If you've never seen Orlandersmith perform, you should know she wields a no-nonsense delivery that pins you to your chair and forces you to listen. Get ready. RICH SMITH

JUNE 9

ART

53. Long Shot 2018: Pop-Up Exhibit & Party
On June 16, one image from every person who participated in the 24-hour photo shoot contest Long Shot on June 9 (for which anyone around the world could take photos and submit them) will be exhibited at a pop-up gallery. In exchange for a donation, take home an image by a local image-snapper. The theme of this year's exhibit is "Chase the Light."

FESTIVALS

54. Georgetown Carnival
Spend the day playing carnival games, dancing to live music from local bands like Selene Vigil, Stag, Sky Cries Mary, the Black Tones, Freddy Trujillo, and others, and making arts and crafts, hanging out in a beer garden, and more.

55. Shilshole Boatfest
The free festival will help boat-curious people navigate the process of obtaining a vessel, and will also feature activities on the water, Ballard vendors, music, and food trucks.

56. Volunteer Park Pride Festival
Kick off Pride season at the beautiful Capitol Hill park's annual celebration (formerly called Pride Family Picnic), which will feature live music, food trucks, a beer garden, craft booths, and more.

FOOD & DRINK

57. Brewshed Beer Fest
Washington Wild's Brewshed Alliance partners—including Brewmaster's Taproom, Latona Pub, PicoBrew, Watershed Pub & Kitchen, and Flatstick Pub—will pour over 40 beers.

58. Grapes, Paws & Hops Festival
Everyone knows that dogs are not allowed to eat grapes, but dog owners can certainly enjoy a beverage made from fermented grapes (wine) and beer in the presence of their pupper at this booze and adoption festival.

MUSIC

59. Barenaked Ladies, Better Than Ezra, KT Tunstall
Canada’s Barenaked Ladies are, in the words of our esteemed music critic Dave Segal, "the aural equivalent of khaki trousers." They are also extremely successful rock musicians who have managed to swing themselves onto the nostalgia circuit for sold-out tour stops for the last few summers. They'll be joined today by Better Than Ezra and KT Tunstall.

60. Dr. Dog
Back when I was still cool, I got to experience a Dr. Dog set on a festival main stage, standing on the sideline as their howling harmonies washed over an enthusiastic crowd of several thousand fans. These guys have showmanship down, and it involves much vigorous playing of instruments and everyone jumping around and flinging themselves all over the stage. Soundwise, Dr. Dog have a handle on 1960s-vintage psych-rock, folk-Americana, and indie-pop with perfectly grooving low-end and spot-on vocal harmonies in music that varies between upbeat odes, heart-tugging balladry, and anthemic rock-outs—much of it moving at a good pace (when it’s not bouncing and ambling along). And those vocals! So sweet and earnest, so blissfully melodic and goose-bump-inducing! This tour backs dark and trippy 10th LP Critical Equation. LEILANI POLK

SPORTS & RECREATION

61. Third Annual Lard Butt 1K Seattle
The Lard Butt 1K is the perfect way to say you've participated in a run (or walk), with the least amount of actual exercise possible. At only 0.62 miles, you won't even have to break a sweat, and you can indulge in doughnuts every 250 meters, as well as beer and mimosas before and after. Don't forget to bring a couple of cans of food for the University District Food Bank to give yourself a sense of actual accomplishment after your pseudo-run.

JUNE 9-10

ART

62. PhotoFest
Glazer's PhotoFest will feature sales, free workshops, talks, and photowalks where you can benefit from the guidance of professionals.

63. Summer Mahouto Market
If you're looking to add to your collection of kawaii and anime art, Mahouto's summer market will feature Japanese culture-inspired work of all kinds from local and regional artists.

SPORTS & RECREATION

64. Rock and Roll Half Marathon
Support St. Jude Children's Research Hospital by running a 5K or half marathon, complete with live bands, DJs, drum lines, and other musical entertainment/distraction along the way.

JUNE 10

MUSIC

65. Ian Anderson Presents: Jethro Tull 50th Anniversary Tour
Fifty years on, pastoral progressive greats Jethro Tull are still kickin’! For those familiar with the group’s history and massive catalog, y’all know Jethro Tull were always more than just frontman Ian Anderson standing on one leg and blowing LAMF into a flute, right? But for everyone else: Jethro Tull make classic rock expanded by folk and jazz. Cool? You should know that this is a newish incarnation of Jethro Tull, but the set list will supposedly include tracks from the group’s long career, including killers off the first album, all their other hits, and for sure the much-loved “Aqualung." MIKE NIPPER

JUNE 11

MUSIC

66. Janelle Monáe, St. Beauty
It takes chutzpah for an artist to launch their career with a concept album inspired by Metropolis, Blade Runner, and Star Wars, but that's what Afrofuturist exponent Janelle Monáe did on her 2010 full-length, The ArchAndroid. As 2013's The Electric Lady and this year's Dirty Computer have proven, her debut was no fluke (Prince, a primary influence, contributed to both records). In the eight years since, Monáe has become a style icon, an accomplished actor, and a role model for anyone unbound by heteronormative codes with the declaration that her sexual orientation is, essentially, "free-ass motherfucker." KATHY FENNESSY

67. New Found Glory, Bayside, The Movielife, WIlliam Ryan Key
To many old-school purists, the term “pop punk” is considered an insult. Florida’s New Found Glory wear it as a badge of honor, though, with T-shirts reading “Pop Punk’s Not Dead.” At this point, there’s an entire generation of bands like A Day to Remember and Man Overboard who would consider New Found Glory to be pop-punk forefathers, combining the catchiness of Blink-182 with the breakdowns of East Coast hardcore. They are joined by two other longtime heavy hitters in this scene that both happen to be from New York: the Movielife and Bayside. KEVIN DIERS

68. Sérgio Mendes
Probable father of all Brazilians, Sérgio Mendes has been incalculably influential on pop, jazz, and samba genres as a producer, composer, keyboardist, and vocalist. Enjoy his worldly presence as Mendes breaks out his five-decade-spanning album catalog and really throws around his old school Rio swing.

PERFORMANCE

69. Kissing Like Babies
Like all babies in their original state, Cherdonna is naked in this show. Yes, she has a baby bonnet on sometimes, and yes, shoes, but other than that? Nothing. The Genius Award-winning choreographer is tackling themes like the infantilization of women and the sexualization of girls in our patriarchal society, and she does it with an oversized baby bottle, backup dancers in baby doll dresses and bows, and a live marching band. This work is funny and vivid and disturbing—like life itself. It premiered at On the Boards last year, and now moves to the much bigger Moore Theatre for one night only. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

JUNE 12

PERFORMANCE

70. Trixie Mattel: Moving Parts
Trixie Mattel once said that all her jokes are cries for help. If that's true, the poor girl needs an intervention. The drag queen and most recent winner of RuPaul's Drag Race: All Stars has built an empire on morbid and strange drag humor, racking up impressive accolades inside and outside the cult of RuPaul, like a TV show on Viceland, a top-selling country album, and a sell-out tour with music from said country album. Mattel, a small-town clown from Wisconsin, has become the gay world's popular girl. Get your tickets now if they're still available. CHASE BURNS

READINGS & TALKS

71. Ken Auletta: Frenemies
After a lot of utopian speculation about democratization of expression and representation, it seems clear that the true purpose of the internet was to refine the accuracy of advertising targeting metrics. An unforeseen consequence is that, thanks to Google and Facebook, the ad biz—and therefore all forms of media, clinging to its ravaged skin like remora—is now subject to the monopoly capitalism in a way it never was before. After more than 25 years reporting on media for the New Yorker, Ken Auletta (author of the indispendable Googled) is precisely the writer to read on this subject. In place of theory, conjecture, and paranoia (widely available on the very same internet mentioned above), Auletta offers hard reporting from a wealth of inside sources from the industries being most dramatically affected. His new book, Frenemies, examines the obsolescent panic in the advertising industry as (big) data transforms what was once laughingly considered an art form into a science. SEAN NELSON

JUNE 13

MUSIC

72. Jonathan Richman with Tommy Larkins
As the cult maestro of the proto-punk giants the Modern Lovers, Jonathan Richman doesn’t need much of an introduction. Since the 1970s, he’s been a freewheelin’ bard, and at age 67 he’s still a scofflaw serenading us with quotidian quips. The fact that he’s playing at the Crocodile means his laid-bare confessions will be more intimate and his lyrical pathos will more closely embrace you. With producer/drummer Tommy Larkins, Jonathan Richman will entertain us with his charm and charisma, plus send us all down memory lane with daft songs like “My Jeans” and inspirationally titled “Velvet Underground.” ZACH FRIMMEL

73. Minus the Bear, The New Trust, Lemolo
This homecoming show marks the conclusion of indie darlings Minus the Bear’s nationwide Planet of Ice: Anniversary Tour, which celebrates the 10th birthday of their eponymous third full-length album with Suicide Squeeze Records. The moody, growling melodies of the New Trust, who accompanied Minus the Bear on tour, bring the harsher side of sentimentality to the surface. However, this show is not all edge—you just might float away into a soundscape with local dream-pop outfit Lemolo. SOPHIA STEPHENS

74. Speedy Ortiz, Anna Burch
Speedy Ortiz’s new single from this year’s Twerp Verse album, “Villain,” covers singer Sadie Dupuis (or a simulacrum thereof) and her encounters with a creep. Things might not be going so bad, until the porn question comes out. Guy apparently doesn’t know that you don’t discuss porn on the first date, let alone before a first date. A more extreme example of what the band does naturally: interchanges undercut with interior monologues and ponderings, doubts, about what could or should get said next. In her songs, Dupuis explores desire and obligation, each going for the choke hold on the mat. ANDREW HAMLIN

75. Ziggy Marley
The honest, upbeat rhythms and lyrics of Ziggy Marley are more on-point than ever with his newest album, Rebellion Rises. With a list of tracks dedicated to the struggle, strife, and salvation of social justice (and the world at large) in 2018, such as “See Dem Fake Leaders” and “I Am a Human,” Marley’s harmonic voice carries through with powerful vulnerability. However, these songs are not all about what Marley thinks—he wants you to be a part of this too, offering songs that invite the listener to push back against the status quo. With a menagerie of musical textures supporting each message of resistance, you’ll sway and dance along to a shared truth with Ziggy. SOPHIA STEPHENS

READINGS & TALKS

76. Michael Eric Dyson: What Truth Sounds Like
Michael Eric Dyson, sociology professor at Georgetown and author of Tears We Cannot Stop, will present his new book What Truth Sounds Like. It's about the 1963 meeting between AG Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, playwright Lorraine Hansberry, psychologist Kenneth Clark, and activist Jerome Smith. Complex questions arose, and Dyson relates them to Black Lives Matter's complications today: "BLM has been accused of harboring a covert queer agenda. The immigrant experience, like that of Kennedy versus the racial experience of Baldwin is a cudgel to excoriate black folk for lacking hustle and ingenuity. The questioning of whether folk who are interracially partnered can authentically communicate black interests persists. And we grapple still with the responsibility of black intellectuals and artists to bring about social change."

77. Tommy Orange: There There
Literary writers with good taste keep telling me that Tommy Orange is the next big thing, and all the early reviewers seem to agree. Publishers Weekly gave There There a star and called it a "commanding debut." Kirkus also gave it a star and called it "astonishingly wide-ranging." The story follows 12 different Native American characters en route to California for the Big Oakland Powwow. Reviewers point out that the novel's diverse array of contemporary characters goes some way in resisting the genocidal notion that Native Americans only live in the past, while also acknowledging that the past haunts the holy fuck out of each and every one of us, and vice versa. Though it sounds like one of those books whose chief pleasures lie in the intersectional storylines, nearly every reviewer mentions Orange's fast-paced storytelling and poignant prose. RICH SMITH

WEED

78. Seattle Kush Marketplace
This trade show brings together cannabis producers, processors, and retail buyers from across the state for a day of networking and, potentially, wholesale deal-making.

JUNE 14

COMEDY

79. The Kevin Hart Irresponsible Tour
He’s pretty much rocketed past the ‘"blowing up" stage of his career into bonafide super stardom, with a fruitful film career and a stand-up that’s earned him comparisons to Raw-era Eddie Murphy, though Hart’s self-deprecating humor is informed by his own unique racial, physical, and familial experiences (his stories about and impressions of his crackhead dad are fucking priceless hilarity). He’s trying out new material on his Irresponsible Tour, and apparently it’s going well; it started in September of last year, and after selling out nearly every date, he added 100 more in January. LEILANI POLK

FILM

80. 'Incredibles 2' Opening
It has been 14 years since The Incredibles showed up to provide the first hint of mirth in the world after George W. Bush’s re-election. (Was it only my imagination or was Mr. Incredible’s character design an idealization of John Kerry?) No one needs to be reminded that the world is ripe for the return of the Parrs—both because a supervillain is once again in charge of the country, and because the past decade has seen all of Hollywood transformed into a comics superhero delivery system, which bodes well for writer/director Brad Bird’s signature ability to bend the vernacular into moving and memorable art. SEAN NELSON

MUSIC

81. #Yes50: Celebrating 50 Years of Yes
Did you see that Kanye West sampled Yes's awesome “Heart of the Sunrise” for a track on Pusha T's new album, Daytona? That warped keyboard drone sounded dope in a hiphop context, and the money earned from said sample should make life easier for cowriters Jon Anderson and Bill Bruford—both of whom aren't in this configuration of Yes. However, guitarist and senior member Steve Howe, drummer Alan White, keyboardist Geoff Downes, and company will run through the legendary UK prog-rock group's most iconic numbers and probably also some deep cuts that reflect Yes's mastery of majestic song structures, complexly beautiful melodies, virtuosic instrumentation, and lyrics that make you say, “Huh?” Even at this late date, theirs is no disgrace. DAVE SEGAL

JUNE 14-24

PERFORMANCE

82. Dragon Mama
Sara Porkalob's family saga, as seen in Madame Dragon and Dragon Lady, will continue with the story of Porkalob's mother Maria, seeking friends of color and queer love in Bremerton, WA. Considering Porkalob's prominence and talent as a performer and director, this may be your chance to catch the genesis of a show that will grow on other stages.

JUNE 14-SEPT 9

ART

83. Double Exposure: Edward S. Curtis, Marianne Nicolson, Tracy Rector, Will Wilson
In the late 19th and early 20th century, ethnologist Edward R. Curtis took more than 40,000 photographs of members of more than 80 indigenous North American tribes. Today, it's a controversial body of work due to the romanticized white gaze Curtis imposed on his subjects. In Double Exposure, the Seattle Art Museum follows a precedent set by the Portland Art Museum of hosting Curtis's photographs alongside three contemporary indigenous artists who respond to that gaze: Dzawada̱’enux̱w linguist and installation artist Marianne Nicolson, Seminole/Choctaw filmmaker Tracy Rector, and Navajo/Diné photographer Will Wilson, whose large-scale tintypes speak to the audience through an app that plays video content of the subjects. EMILY POTHAST

JUNE 15

MUSIC

84. UP10TION
Korean pop and hiphop dance group UP10TION have been riding a wild wave of publicity since their first full-length album dropped. This is their first United States tour, so get in there quick before it sells out.

PERFORMANCE

85. Next Step: Outside In
The Pacific Northwest Ballet's annual showcase of new dance works will spread outside onto Seattle Center's yards. Outdoor performances are free to view, while indoor dances afterwards are $25. The NEXT STEP's choreographers this year are Guillaume Basso, Nancy Casciano, Christopher d’Ariano, Cecilia Iliesiu, and Amanda Morgan, and the program also includes pieces by Donald Byrd, Miles Pertl, and Bruno Roque, as well as Noelani Pantastico’s Picnic. Stay on for a dance party with Purple Lemonade Collective.

JUNE 15-SEPT 23

ART

86. Juventino Aranda: Pocket Full of Posies
As Kanye West demonstrated by tweeting a photo of himself wearing one, a red MAGA hat is no mere political artifact; it's a potently charged totem, both symptomatic and symbolic of America's deeply racist past and present. In a recent show at Greg Kucera Gallery, Juventino Aranda exhibited a painted cast bronze version of the MAGA hat with all the words removed except "GREAT," imbuing it with a tragicomic sense of resignation. The child of Mexican immigrants, Aranda marries the activist spirit of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta with a cool, conceptual post-minimalism to explore how ideology is communicated visually. Pocket Full of Posies is his first museum show. EMILY POTHAST

JUNE 15-FEB 10

ART

87. Martha Friedman: Castoffs
Martha Friedman is a master of uneasy forms, using tubing and cement to evoke a distorted, blobby version of the male body. In contrast, little glass-blown fingers reference both erotic acts and "Egyptian two-finger amulets that were placed at the site of incision after embalming to protect the integrity of the body in the afterlife." You may feel both fascination and an icky, quasi-sexual discomfort at the site of these strange forms.

JUNE 15-APRIL 14

ART

88. Lore Re-Imagined: Shadows of Our Ancestors
Curator Chieko Phillips has brought together three artists who make work that engages the cultural traditions of previous generations. Satpreet Kahlon uses embroidery and textile techniques passed down by her mother and grandmother to create soft works with strong critical subtexts. Seattle-born artist Alex Anderson studied ceramics in Jingdezhen and Hangzhou, China, and currently lives and works in LA, making work that probes the moral and physical decay lurking behind seemingly flawless facades. Also known as a photographer, Megumi Shauna Arai's Unnamed Lake uses the Japanese hand-stitched embroidery technique of sashiko to reflect on the physical, mental, and emotional implications of the act of mending. EMILY POTHAST

JUNE 15-16

FESTIVALS

89. Paradiso Festival
Paradiso is the PNW's premier festival of WUB-WUB-WUB, colloquially known as brostep, also called EDM, which is short for "electronic dance music" (you're welcome, grandpa). Headliners include Deadmau5, DJ Snake, and Armin Van Buuren. Trust that glow sticks will be wielded, hearts broken, and vape pens smoked.

JUNE 15-17

FESTIVALS

90. Edmonds Arts Festival
Enjoy three days of arts, entertainment, shopping, and dining, with a wide selection of more than 240 artist booths, three juried galleries, over 1,000 pieces of student art, more than 20 food vendors, and other attractions.

FOOD & DRINK

91. 13th Annual Washington Brewers Festival
Maximizers who thrive when presented with a dizzying array of choices should enjoy this festival from the Washington Beer Commission, which offers 500 beers from over 100 Washington brewers in Marymoor Park. Besides beer, there’s also a specialty root beer garden for designated drivers and the 21-and-under crowd to enjoy, plus 17 food vendors, including excellent handmade tamales from Frelard Tamales, local-beer-battered, London-style fish and chips from Nosh Food Truck, New Orleans soul food from Where Ya At Matt, and mouth-watering smoked meats from Wood Shop BBQ, not to mention a kids' playground and music and entertainment all weekend. JULIANNE BELL

JUNE 15-JULY 1

PERFORMANCE

92. The Last Starfighter
The idea that video games could be used as a recruitment tool by an alien race on the lookout for human teenage boys to help them fight off predators was ahead of its time, as was this cult 1984 sci-fi action comedy film, which featured the earliest examples of CGI known to cinema. How they’re going to make it work as a stage play is a pretty rich mystery, but if your affection for the movie runs as deep as it usually does (if you’ve heard of it, odds are it’s pretty special to you, as it was not a big hit at the time), it’s probably worth a trip to the Eastside to find out. SEAN NELSON

JUNE 16

ART

93. Lusio Lights Georgetown
Dance to DJs' cuts in the midst of projection mapping and other light art installations at this bar/restaurant/art space.

COMEDY

94. Dane Cook
If you remember, Dane Cook was hugely popular (and divisive) in the first decade or so of the 2000s. If you dig dudebro humor, you might want to shell out for the tickets and drag yourself down to Tacoma.

95. Emily Heller: Live Comedy Special Taping
A writer on the hit new show Barry and a host of the podcast Baby Geniuses, Heller will deliver her jokes in person to a crowd of Seattleites. They add: "She’s trying to go for that Wonder Woman thing where they got a bunch of publicity for not letting men in. That kind of press would really be great. However, this is in no way enforceable, and she won’t actually be able to stop men from coming in because she can’t afford to get sued like the Wonder Woman people did."

96. Kathy Griffin: Laugh Your Head Off World Tour
Before May of 2017, Kathy Griffin was, by her own admission, a “D-list” comedian. A successful D-list comedian, with a 30-plus year career to her name, but, still, she was more likely to be seen commenting on red carpet events than to be invited to them herself. Then came The Incident, when she posed for a photo with a simulacrum of Donald Trump’s severed head, and in a moment, she went from comedian to pariah. After months of canceled shows (and even a federal investigation), Griffin is back on tour, and will be severing Trump’s head (metaphorically speaking, of course) when she comes to Seattle. KATIE HERZOG

COMMUNITY

97. Solstice Night Market
Take advantage of increasingly longer and warmer days by shopping for handmade goods and local art well into the evening.

FOOD & DRINK

98. POUR
While wine tasting is often thought of as a destination activity, relegated to weekend trips to Woodinville or eastern Washington, Seattle is lucky to host a coterie of urban wineries within its city limits. The second edition of this annual festival will feature tastings from over 20 Seattle-based wineries, including Aluel Cellars, Cloudlift Cellars, Elsom Cellars, Nine Hats Wines, and more, plus music and street food. JULIANNE BELL

MUSIC

99. Live from Here with Chris Thile & Guests: Ben Folds, Dave Hill, & Gaby Moreno
Known best for being the mandolinist and singer of Nickel Creek and the Punch Brothers, Chris Thile now also hosts the new Prairie Home Companion, renamed as Live From Here. He'll be joined by Ben Folds, Dave Hill, and Gaby Moreno.

READINGS & TALKS

100. Ulysses Bloomsday Staged Reading
Calling Irish literature nerds: What are you doing for Bloomsday? If you haven't made plans yet to mark the date on which James Joyce's mammoth novel Ulysses takes place, during which the protagonist Leopold Bloom travels picaresquely through Dublin, don't sweat it. This year’s reading picks up from last year's with Chapter 8, “Lestrygonians,” and Chapter 9, “Scylla and Charybdis.” Whether you've read the great 20th-century classic or not, this is a great way to commune in love for the possibilities of the English language. (We're not sure we should add this, but apparently Joyce set the book on June 16 to commemorate a particularly significant real-life handjob. Just so you know what you're celebrating.)

101. Write-O-Rama
Get the maximum amount of instruction from Hugo House's excellent prose writers and poets at this annual event featuring six hours of hourlong mini-workshops and talks.

JUNE 16-17

FESTIVALS

102. Black Arts Fest
Festival Sundiata presents a two-day celebration of African American culture, including African dance and drumming workshops, fashion demonstrations, a market, food, and more.

103. Fremont Solstice Fair
Let that free spirit fill you with whatever Fremont people are into at the annual Fremont Solstice Fair, a massive outdoor urban festival filled fit to bust with hippies, families, foodies, and artists. It's primarily for the parade, featuring elaborately painted (and sometimes just wild 'n' free) nude bicyclists, but also offers tons of food, crafts, activities, performances, great people-watching, and a beer garden.

JUNE 17

EVERYWHERE

104. Father's Day
Raise a glass to the kind dads in your life. Find a list of Seattle Father's Day events here, including the Bell Harbor Classic Weekend, the 13th Annual Washington Brewers Festival, and a special Seattle Mariners vs. Boston Red Sox promotion.

MUSIC

105. Aly & AJ
Aly and AJ Michalka are a sisterly duo who were a part of the early '00s Disney Channel pantheon of smiling blondes in recurring cheerleader-girl-squad-escapade movie and TV roles who pursue a music career for no reason other than they can. They're back on the scene for the first time in ten years under their original "Aly & AJ" moniker to celebrate the release of their new EP, Ten Years (natch).

106. Chris Isaak
Chris Isaak is not quite Roy Orbison, but he is now ten years older than Orbison ever was, which shocks me, anyway. Isaak’s rockabilly growl resembles Orbison’s more playful teddy-bear style—but again like Orbison, he sails high notes across shimmering backings, creating a virtual beachscape so smooth and so eerie, you have to get in your car and drive, just to give it some rubber-tire roughage. Easy to say Isaak’s style never escapes stylization, but I disagree. Maybe it’s because I spent so much time on those lamentations in my MTV days. And I never learned to drive. ANDREW HAMLIN

107. Kimya Dawson, Guayaba, Ruby Blades Latin Reggae Jazz Quintet
Former K Records darling Kimya Dawson has been writing songs in the Pacific Northwest for a very long time. She, Guayaba, and Ruby Blades Latin Reggae Jazz Quintet will donate proceeds from this show to Puerto Rico relief efforts.

108. Violent Femmes, Ava Mendoza
Violent Femmes tapped something deep, something dark and sweet and a little scary, with “Blister in the Sun,” a song that can be taken up by guitar, sax, or a bunch of deeply drunk folks shuffling en masse up and down dorm stairs to celebrate a rare day of hot weather in the Northwest. Frat boys love them and misfits love them for the same reason: They express frustration like it is, with a liberal splash of wit. Naysayers say nothing past the first album makes any difference, but try (just for an example) 1986’s “I Held Her in My Arms,” where the sax says something every go-round, something Gordon Gano’s afraid to put into words. ANDREW HAMLIN

PERFORMANCE

109. Dita von Teese and the Copper Coupe
Probably the most famous burlesque dancer alive, Dita Von Teese will take her sexy and luxurious act to Seattle. See her curl up in a giant cocktail glass, get showered with more than 1000 pearl balloons while dancing in a giant seashell, and slink around in leather and Swarovski crystals.

JUNE 18

READINGS & TALKS

110. Shirley MacLaine
In an age when the words “iconic” and “legendary” are trotted out to modify shoes and sandwiches, language pales before the greatness of Shirley MacLaine. Though she endured a certain amount of punchline derision for the more woo woo elements in her 1983 book Out on a Limb, no one has ever impugned her gifts as a trouper. She is one of the last of the old line of people who became stars by dint of will and versatility—she sings like magic, dances like a dervish, and is equally adept at broad comedy and intimate drama. She was Fran Kubelik. She was Aurora Greenaway. She was Doris Mann. She was Ouiser Boudreaux. I have no idea what the hell she’s going to talk about at this event, but the career she’s had guarantees at least a few lifetimes worth of unforgettable stories. SEAN NELSON

JUNE 18-19

READINGS & TALKS

111. Michael Bennett: Things That Make White People Uncomfortable
Former Stranger editor-in-chief Tricia Romano called Michael Bennett "the best Seahawk," and for good reason. In addition to being a Super Bowl champ, a three-time Pro Bowler, and one of the best defensive ends in the country, Michael Bennet is a powerful voice in the Black Lives Matter movement, and also a fucking hilarious person. (Remember that time he stole a police bike and rode it around CenturyLink stadium to celebrate winning the 2015 NFC championship?) In his new memoir Things that Make White People Uncomfortable, co-written by Dave Zirin, Bennett recounts the path that led him to where he is now and articulates his thoughts about racial dynamics in the country. Though the title seems confrontational, he knows what he's doing with it. “I believe you need to be uncomfortable to become comfortable with different people,” he told Lois Nam at the Undefeated. RICH SMITH

JUNE 19

COMEDY

112. Ron Funches
Watch any Ron Funches clip on YouTube, or go to one of his live sets, and if you’re not in love with his gentle, quirky observations and off-kilter, ganja-logic transitions, you need to reassess your worldview. Dude is one of the funniest humans on Earth now. Funches may have lost a lot of weight recently, but rest assured: He’s still punching well above it with his endlessly unpredictable thoughts about whatever absurdities pop into his pot-enhanced mind. (“I like marijuana. It’s like getting a hug on your insides.”) This performance will be filmed for a TV special. DAVE SEGAL

MUSIC

113. Chris Brown, 6lack, H.E.R., Rich the Kid
Often in the news for not great reasons, Chris Brown will buck the serious stuff and return to the region with guests 6lack, H.E.R., and Rich the Kid on his Heartbreak on a Full Moon Tour.

READINGS & TALKS

114. Clarion West Presents: Daniel Abraham
You may best know Daniel Abraham as the writer/executive producer of the The Expanse, which Charles Mudede hailed as "a masterpiece of TV sci-fi." But he's also written books under three different names: MLN Hanover for urban fantasy, James S. A. Corey for futuristic sci fi, and his own name for epic fantasy. Tonight, he'll read new work and answer questions about his craft.

JUNE 19-22

FESTIVALS

115. The King County Fair
This annual summer festival promises live music, vendors, food, 4-H classes, and more.

JUNE 20

MUSIC

116. GoGo Penguin
A UK jazz ensemble that uses modern flourishes and incorporates elements of rock, classical, triphop, and electronic music into their compositions. Minimalist piano melodies often amp up the pace to chase, duel with, and mimic break-beats and electro-inspired rhythms in urgent staccato key plunks and breezier dancing strokes. RIYL: The Bad Plus, Portico Quartet, Medeski Martin & Wood. LEILANI POLK

READINGS & TALKS

117. Angela Garbes with Anika Anand
One of the finest writers who ever worked at this newspaper, Garbes (author of “The More I Learn About Breast Milk, the More Amazed I Am,” the 2015 story that broke our website’s traffic records) presents her first book, an investigative reflection on an aspect of childbirth that receives surprisingly little attention from the medical establishment or the baby book publishing industry: The mental and physical health of the mother. "Your OB will cautiously quote statistics; online sources will scare you with conflicting and often inaccurate information; and even the most trusted books will offer information with a heavy dose of judgment. To educate herself, the food and culture writer embarked on an intensive journey of exploration, diving into the scientific mysteries and cultural myths that surround motherhood to find answers to her questions that had only previously been given through a lens of what women ought to do-instead of allowing them the freedom to choose the right path themselves." SEAN NELSON

118. Peter Rubin: Future Presence
This Wired senior editor's book exposes the possibilities of virtual reality and its effects on relationships, work, and entertainment.

JUNE 20-21

FILM

119. The Totally Gay Sing Along
Sing along to over 25 queer cuts and classics from Broadway and beyond.

JUNE 21

MUSIC

120. The Decemberists, M. Ward
If Colin Meloy had his druthers, the Decemberists would exist in 1970s England, where they could share stage time and radio airplay with the psych-folk giants of the day: Fairport Convention, the Pentangle, and the Albion Dance Band. But, of course, as a modern-day musician, the closest Meloy can get is by paying tribute to artists who inspire him. Their influence can be heard on the Decemberists' rootsier moments and on his 2006 EP Colin Meloy Sings Shirley Collins. ROBERT HAM

121. Dirty Projectors
Dirty Projector’s 2005 release The Getty Address was the type of album an artist releases right before they vanish from the music biz; the glitch-hop opera breached numerous critics top 10 lists for ’05, and even motivated Prefuse 73 to declare that he’s “quitting music.” An epic concept album replete with tons of electronics and even a mini-orchestra, The Getty Address stands as one of the most imaginative and unique records I’ve heard in ages. At times, the fusion of strings and chorus with heavy bass rolls and programmed beats can initially feel a bit jarring. But taken as whole, everything about The Getty Address jives perfectly, proving that you don’t have to sacrifice a catchy hook in order to experiment with new sounds and new ideas. STEVEN SAWADA

PERFORMANCE

122. National Treasures
An all-star lineup of Bianca Del Rio, Lady Bunny, Sherry Vine, and Jackie Beat will take over the stage for two hours.

READINGS & TALKS

123. Dr. Jordan Peterson
Depending on who you ask, Jordan Peterson is either a life-changing self-help guru who is saving young men from a future of video games and jerking off in their moms’ basements, or a huckster who is guiding the same young men toward nihilism, misogyny, and the racist alt-right. Whatever your opinion, the famed Canadian psychologist and best-selling author will be in Seattle for the second time in as many months. Is he a savior or is he a fraud? Perhaps the best way to find out is to listen, and judge, for yourself. KATIE HERZOG

124. Roxane Gay: Not That Bad
Roxane Gay, whose collection of essays, Bad Feminist, launched her into the public eye, is back with a new anthology, Not That Bad, which includes authors and other figures both known and new, like actors Ally Sheedy and Gabrielle Union, and writers Amy Jo Burns, Lyz Lenz, Claire Schwartz, and Bob Shacochis. These essays are wide-ranging and include explorations of the impact of rape, harassment, and violence, but, at heart, they are all about what it is to be a woman in today's world. While sometimes it really is that bad, Gay, in person, is sure to deliver. KATIE HERZOG

JUNE 21-24

MUSIC

125. Spanish Harlem Orchestra
Two-time Grammy-winning salsa and Latin jazz band Spanish Harlem Orchestra was founded by Aaron Levinson and Oscar Hernandez and has continuously set the standard for how hardcore New York-style salsa should sound. They'll play a four-night set in celebration of their most recently released album, which features jazz icons Chick Corea and saxophonist Joe Lovano.

JUNE 22

FILM

126. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard return to Jurassic World to save them rompin’-stompin’ dinos from a big volcano! Will Bryce remember her saurian-stalking footwear this time?

MUSIC

127. Everclear, Marcy Playground, Local H, DJ Art Alexakis
I find that Sparkle & Fade still holds up, a memorable mid-‘90s time capsule of trashy angst poems that’s probably soundtracked many a 40-something dad’s divorce. What was I thinking about at 15, listening to Everclear talk about addiction, about restarting, about feeling like a whore? I guess it resonated with a certain unearned wistfulness I had back then—and obviously still have, just regarding 20 years’ worth more of shit. LARRY MIZELL JR.

128. Farruko
Puerto Rican singer-songwriter Farruko will bring his reggae and trap hits to Seattle.

129. Kings of Leon, Local Natives
Kings of Leon's effort, Only by the Night, features the unstoppable song "Sex on Fire," on which Caleb Followill's vocals absolutely soar. "Yooouuuuu, your sex is on fiiiyaaah." Ears are held in the honey and strength of his vocal grip. The song goes off. The rest of the album, however, lacks that fire. It falls into a midtempo rut. KOL have said they're upset by lack of sales in the U.S. compared to those in Europe. Maybe if their albums were more full of the fire, sales would increase. We Americans like fire. KOL still need to be seen, though. They're carrying the Southern-rock torch. TRENT MOORMAN

130. Primus, Mastodon, JJUUJJUU
One of my favorite visuals that played during a concert in recent memory was a white animated elephant jumping on a trampoline during Primus’ “Southbound Pachyderm,” its cute trunk-swinging body rocketing higher and higher as the song crept, drove, then galloped to its conclusion. A band that never has disappointed in the six times I’ve seen them rage the stage, Primus push out an absurdist-cheeky mix of experimental rock and alt metal that’s heavy on the funk and propelled by Les Claypool’s idiosyncratic, rubbery low-end banging, string-yanking prowess, and nasally singsong vocals, with strong backup in Larry LaLonde’s relentlessly riffy and shreddy guitar. It’s the kind of music that makes me feel both utterly satisfied and a pressing desire to bounce and thrash around while screaming, “Too many puuuuuppies” and doing my best twisted-faced air bass impression. Definitely a must-see. (The band, not my terrible air bass.) LEILANI POLK

PERFORMANCE

131. BeautyBoiz Queer AF
Join the BeautyBoiz QUEER AF for an extravaganza of drag, boylesque, vodka cocktails, and dancing. Frolic with Waxie Moon, Betty Wetter, Kimber Shade, Tink Le Belle, Faggedy Randy, aerialist Eric Sanford, Thadayus & the Electrofunks, Erin Bednarz, Timaeus Le, Chip Wilson, and CarLarans.

JUNE 22-23

MUSIC

132. Arlo Guthrie
Arlo Guthrie will stop by Bow, WA to play a concert on tour for the 51st anniversary of Alice's Restaurant, and in honor of the countless classics he penned throughout his prolific career as America's country-crossing bard.

JUNE 22-24

FESTIVALS

133. Ace Comic Con
Emerald City Comic Con was in March, but you have another chance to meet your superheroes: Tom Holland, Elizabeth Olsen, Hayley Atwell, Chris Hemsworth, and Tom Hiddleston are the biggest guest names. And, of course, you'll have the chance to meet dozens of comic artists and pick up souvenirs.

READINGS & TALKS

134. Locus Awards 2018
Locus sci-fi fan magazine will celebrate its 50th birthday and distribute awards to some of the best in the field. There will also be readings by excellent future-feminist Connie Willis and epic sci-fi writer Yoon Ha Lee, panels, signings, and a party.

JUNE 23

FESTIVALS

135. PrideFest Capitol Hill
For the fifth year in a row, a glorious mass of rainbow flag-bearers will reclaim the streets of Capitol Hill—a historically queer neighborhood—for PrideFest. This year, the festival sites will be expanded to include Broadway from John to Roy, as well as Denny Way and Cal Anderson Park.

MUSIC

136. Buddy Guy
Genre pioneer and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Buddy Guy was a massive influence on music titans like Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, and Stevie Ray Vaughan. He's also known for shaping Chicago's legendary West Side sound, and acts as a link to the city's history of electric blues even now at the ripe age of 81.

137. The Dirty Heads, Iration, The Movement, Pacific Dub
Five-piece experimentalist group the Dirty Heads have spent the last two decades fine-tuning their sunny reggae-meets-hiphop sound. They'll be joined by Iration, The Movement, and Pacific Dub.

138. Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons
Frankie Valli, lead singer of the Four Seasons, has been making music since the early 60s. But you probably recognize his story from the 2005 Tony-winning musical Jersey Boys, which chronicles the singer and his group. As the show enters its third year on Broadway, Frankie himself will bring his classic tunes to Seattle on his US tour.

139. Jimmy Buffett & The Coral Reefer Band
Parrothead patriarch and island lifer Jimmy Buffett and his Coral Reefer Band will return to Seattle for one night only to share his easy beach-folk jams with his millions of followers.

PERFORMANCE

140. 90th Anniversary Celebration: The People's Theatre
Polymath Nancy Guppy will host this free celebration of the historic venue's 90th anniversary, with performances from SassyBlack plus queer friends, Lieu Quan Lion Dance Team, Apna Bhangra Crew, NW Tap Connection (with music by Shakiah Danielson and Levi Ware), Ten Man Brass Band, Seattle Kokon Taiko, and Seattle Women's Steel Pan Project. There will even be an outdoor cash bar.

READINGS & TALKS

141. Lindy West, Kate Durbin, Stacey Tran
You all know by now that New York Times columnist (née Stranger staff writer) Lindy West is the funniest and most incisive feminist with 1,200 words due twice a month, but you might not know the other two insanely good writers supporting her on this bill. Writer and performance artist Kate Durban, who's often the most neon-colored entity in the room, literally wears her obsession with American and international pop culture on her sleeves. (I once saw a photo of her in a Disney princess dress composed of drawings of Disney princesses in dresses.) Tran's debut book of poems, Soap for the Dogs, is a spare and gorgeous look at family history and food. Her "Fake Haiku" series is great, and the last few lines of the title poem punches me in the gut every time she reads it. This reading kicks off Gramma Poetry's quarterly series, which pairs national writers with local talent. You'll want to keep up with this one. RICH SMITH

JUNE 23-24

MUSIC

142. Michael Franti & Spearhead, John Butler Trio
Bay Area rapper/vocalist/guitarist Michael Franti’s moved on from the industrial-punk-hiphop bands Beatnigs and Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy (who collaborated with Naked Lunch author William S. Burroughs) to the less sonically agitational but still politically conscious approach of Spearhead. Over the last 15 years, his blend of rap, rock, funk, folk, jazz, and reggae has propelled Franti & Spearhead to a prominent place on the festival circuit, where his left-leaning observations about race and other sociopolitical issues go down as easily as his feel-good, soul-inflating songs. DAVE SEGAL

JUNE 24

FESTIVALS

143. Seattle Pride Parade
The streets of downtown will fill with rainbow flags once again as thousands of LGBTQ+ Seattleites and allies gather for the 44th annual Pride parade. This year's theme is "Pride Beyond Borders." Afterwards, head to Seattle Center to continue celebrating queer culture at PrideFest.

FOOD & DRINK

144. Lamb Jam Seattle 2018
Sixteen rising-star Seattle chefs from restaurants like Lark, Mamnoon, Omega Ouzeri, Lola, Heartwood Provisions, and Le Petit Cochon will duke it out to create the best lamb dish and be named Lamb Jam Seattle Champion.

MUSIC

145. Andrea Bocelli
Even if you aren’t even a remote fan of the pop-classical genre, you've undoubtedly heard the strong, soaring tenor of Italian vocal great Andrea Bocelli, arguably the most famous opera singer to reach more mainstream audiences. Part of it is sheer flooding of the market—he has 15 studio albums to his credit, not to mention comps, live albums, collaborations, and opera recordings—but it’s also savvy duets with both mega pop stars (Celine Dion, Ed Sheeran, Jennifer Lopez) and luminaries of the stage (Sarah Brightman, Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo). LEILANI POLK

146. Buckethead
Buckethead is the shred guitarist late of Guns N’ Roses and many other bands, boasting a hockey mask and the bucket hat. Buckethead should be loud and coruscating, as well as manic, and has been clocked as one of the fastest guitarists in the known universe, going so far as to commit shred heresy. That’s right, he actually slows down. ANDREW HAMLIN

147. Indigo Girls
Amy Ray and Emily Saliers are still Indigo Girls (the band's approaching 33!) and still folk-rockin'. They'll perform on the bucolic north meadow of the Woodland Park Zoo as a part of the annual summer concert series, ZooTunes.

READINGS & TALKS

148. Seven Things I've Learned: An Afternoon with Ira Glass
The creator of This American Life, Ira Glass, not only hosts his own blockbuster radio show and podcast, he’s also produced film and television, danced with a famed ballerina company, DJed with our own DJ Dan Savage, and influenced an entire generation of current storytellers and radio producers. If there’s a podcast you love, chances are, Ira Glass has had some kind of influence on it, and he’ll be talking about both his life and his work when he brings his latest act to Tacoma. KATIE HERZOG

THROUGH JUNE 24

PERFORMANCE

149. Mac Beth
An adaptation of the Shakespeare play that dare not speak its name inside a theater, Erica Schmidt’s reimagining grows out of high-school students discovering the text after school and gradually coming to inhabit the characters, language, and grisly thematic deathscape. Macbeth is all about the toxicity of ambition, a moral framework that is always valuable to revisit. It’s also rare among Shakespeare's plays in that the female lead is actually the best part in the whole show by a mile. It’s intriguing to think of what an all-female cast will make of both the work itself and the act of claiming it. SEAN NELSON

150. Wild Horses
Allison Gregory's play is about a young woman remembering the summer that changed her overconfident adolescent self forever. Sheila Daniels will direct.

JUNE 26

MUSIC

151. The Get Up Kids, The Casket Lottery
The Get Up Kids may have some things to feel sorry about, but for a moment there, in the growing pains between their early emo and their late-period pop rock, they and their aforementioned peers made some great records. The Get Up Kids' debut full-length, 1997's Four Minute Mile, was typical but expertly executed second-wave stuff, balancing big sing-along choruses and unexpected hooks with unconventional song structures and changes, hard and fast breaks of drums and guitars, and raw-screaming feelings. ERIC GRANDY

JUNE 26-27

MUSIC

152. Jimmy Webb
Even if he had only written “Wichita Lineman,” Jimmy Webb would still belong in the pantheon. But of course, he also wrote about 900 of the finest mellow hit songs of the ‘60s, ‘70s, and ‘80s. “MacArthur Park.” “Galveston.” “Up Up and Away.” “All I Know.” “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” “Didn’t We.” So many others. Not to mention his almost perversely interesting catalog of deep cuts. “When Does Brown Begin.” “Rosecrans Blvd.” “The Yard Went on Forever.” “Paper Cup.” Even more others. To say even less about "The Last Unicorn." He literally wrote the book about songwriting (Tunesmith, an essential text). Webb is a rare flower, and he doesn’t come to town very often. This isn’t to say that we need him more than want him, but it is to say that this is the very definition of the kind of show you regret not going to for all time. SEAN NELSON

JUNE 27

MUSIC

153. Robert Plant & The Sensational Shape Shifters, Lucinda Williams
Known for being the frontman for the New Yardbirds—sorry, Led Zeppelin, Robert Plant will criss-cross North America on tour for his latest album of classic rock bravado, Carry Fire. He'll be joined by his current backing band, the Sensational Shape Shifters, and Lucinda Williams.

154. Trampled By Turtles, Deer Tick
It's been said that the only legitimate "alt-country" music comes from folks raised on the old-timey stuff and exposed to rock subcultures later in their lives. It's a dismissive rule of thumb that could unfortunately slight some undeserving acts. Case in point: Deer Tick. Who knows which came first for these boys—maybe it was Johnny Cash, maybe it was Johnny Ramone. But it's hard to doubt the honesty of their ragged electrified brand of Americana. Their forlorn tales of whiskey and women may be nothing new, but folk and country have never been about reinventing the wheel, but about resonating that common chord that bonds us all together. And there's something in John McCauley's voice and that rough-around-the-edges guitar... I'm a believer. BRIAN COOK

JUNE 27-JULY 1

PERFORMANCE

155. The Color Purple
Alice Walker is taking over Seattle this year, and I'm fine with that. She'll be opening up the poetry series for Seattle Arts and Lectures in October, but this summer the Paramount will run Tony-winning director John Doyle's version of this Tony-winning musical, which was based on Walker's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name. If you haven't read the book, or if your mom didn't sit you down and make you watch the 1995 film adaptation starring Oprah, you should know that Walker sets the story in Jim Crow Georgia. Celie grows up the victim of unspeakable violence at the hands of men. This trend follows her into adulthood, but she comes into her own with the help of strong female role models. RICH SMITH

JUNE 28

MUSIC

156. Gomez
In their native UK, Gomez are Mercury Prize-winning crowd pleasers, but despite decades of trying—including a high-profile signing to Dave Matthews's record label and splashy opening gigs for Pearl Jam—the band's quest for mainstream US stardom remains mostly elusive. Tonight, Gomez bring their reliably melodic indie rock to the Showbox for the 20th anniversary of their debut album. DAVID SCHMADER

READINGS & TALKS

157. Robin DiAngelo: White Fragility
Non-white people tend to speak regularly and freely about the pernicious nature of racism because they deal with its stresses on a daily basis. Recent headlines remind us that black people in particular can't nap in common areas, drive around in cars, or barbecue in the park without someone calling the cops on them. But white people, as UW professor Robin DiAngelo argues in White Fragility, "live in a social environment that protects and insulates them from race-based stress." This environment has softened them to such a degree that whenever they experience the slightest hint of discrimination—or whenever they have to talk about race at all—they freak out and elect Donald Trump to the presidency. DiAngelo describes this phenomenon with admirable academic rigor, and she proposes good, common-sense suggestions for dealing with it. RICH SMITH

JUNE 28-AUG 29

FESTIVALS

158. Movies at Marymoor Park
Watch big hits—recent and classic—on the big screen. The lineup includes Wonder Woman, The Princess Bride, The Greatest Showman, Coco, Black Panther, 10 Things I Hate About You, and more. They also promise trivia, food trucks, and other surprises.

JUNE 29

COMEDY

159. David Cross: Oh Come On
A few years ago, Sean Nelson wrote: "For nearly two decades now, David Cross has gotten a lot of comedic mileage out of puncturing the cynical assumptions made by corporate America—often by doing nothing more than stating them aloud. His best work identifies the more alarming way consumer culture seeps into our moral and intellectual groundwater, poisoning the clones who swallow whatever they’re fed as well as those who believe they’re offering a meaningful protest." All Cross has said about his newest tour is that it's full of "hi-jinx and tomfoolery" and that he's "driving right up to your fucking door to bring you the A #1 killer shit.” (On the other hand, he recently invited some controversy and bad feeling at that infamous Arrested Development interview.)

FILM

160. Sicario: Day of the Soldado
Stefanio Solima directs this sequel to the widely praised 2015 thriller about two US agents fighting the brutal drug trade along the US-Mexico border, with Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro in the leads once again.

MUSIC

161. Alpha Blondy
Cote d'Ivoire roots rock and reggae legend Alpha Blondy will bring his thirty-plus years of experience to Seattle this summer, with his 12-piece band Solar System.

162. Counting Crows, LIVE
In celebration of their 25 years gigging around the country, early '00s alt rock stalwarts the Counting Crows will take over Auburn for a summer evening of music with opener LIVE.

163. Creedence Clearwater Revisited, Blue Öyster Cult
Hooboy, how to explain Blue Öyster Cult if you don’t already know ’em? A thinking person’s heavy-metal band? A thinking person’s stoner-rock? Dedicated devotees of Lovecraft, Stephen King, John Shirley, and Michael Moorcock, the latter two of whom wrote lyrics for ’em? “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” made the charts, made the soundtrack for the original Halloween, and it’s still good for scaring yourself in the basement, especially on really potent da kine. I like their recent (well, 2001) stuff better than most people, but fear not: This is a casino gig, so the hits will be happening. Beware of contact highs. Unless you seek them out. ANDREW HAMLIN

164. Dead & Company
For whatever reason, John Mayer catalyzed a folksy rebirth of American music in order to relive all of jam band extraordinaire the Grateful Dead's best moments. The whole crew will be present for a long night in the Gorge.

165. Nipsey Hussle
Still rolling on the success of perma-relevant track "Fuck Donald Trump" with YG, LA rapper Nipsey Hussle graces us with his energetic presence and live theatrics on his Victory Lap Tour.

READINGS & TALKS

166. Amber Tamblyn: Any Man
Amber Tamblyn (the author of the poetry collection Dark Sparkler and a nominee for Emmy, Golden Globe, and Independent Spirit awards) will share her debut novel about a serial female rapist, Maude, who preys on men, "a horrible woman who becomes the phantom on which society projects its greatest fears, fascinations and even misogyny."

SPORTS & RECREATION

167. Seattle Night Ride
Peddle a 15-mile flat route through the Burke-Gilman Trail, Fremont, Lake Union, and Queen Anne by night, punctuated by plenty of rest stop entertainment. Costumes and (safe) bike accessories highly encouraged. Be sure you have proper lights and reflectors.

JUNE 29-JULY 1

FESTIVALS

168. Seattle Taiwanese American Film Festival
The brand-new festival will screen seven features and a number of shorts highlighting Taiwanese American filmic talent.

JUNE 30

FESTIVALS

170. Grillfest Northwest
At this carnivorous competition sanctioned by the Steak Cookoff Association, watch expert pitmasters engage in a barbecue battle royale. You can also watch cooking demos, enjoy food trucks and a beer garden, and witness throw-downs between local chefs throughout the day.

171. The Vera Project Presents Elysian Brewing's Search Party
Show your support for excellent all-ages music venue Vera Project by dancing to live sets from local rockers Young the Giant, Deerhunter, Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears, and Sundries (as well as KEXP DJs) while drinking Elysian brews.

MUSIC

172. I Love the '90s Tour
Experience the resurrection of all your favorite still-alive '90s thrillers with this ridiculously stacked line-up of Salt-N-Pepa, Sir Mix-a-lot, Vanilla Ice, Rob Base, Young MC, and DJ Kool.

READINGS & TALKS

173. Bill Clinton
Love him or loathe him, Bill Clinton comes to Seattle with his new his new political thriller, The President is Missing, a collaboration with blockbuster crime novelist James Patterson. It’s an intriguing combo: Patterson is a master storyteller and Clinton has more inside knowledge of D.C. politics and national security than almost anyone on the planet (especially compared to the current occupant of the Oval Office). While the novel is entertaining enough, this is also your chance to see a U.S. President who actually won the White House and knew how to run it. KATIE HERZOG

JUNE 30-JULY 1

FESTIVALS

174. Urban Craft Uprising Summer Show
"Seattle's largest indie craft show" boasts a very large number of vendors—150 or more—selling toys, clothing, jewelry, food, clothes, crafts, etc., etc., etc. It's a boon for small business owners and customers alike. Just be prepared for crowds: These markets can easily draw 12,000 indie shoppers.

JUNE 30-AUG 12

ART

175. In the Spirit Northwest Native Festival
For the 13th year, native artists will showcase their work at the In the Spirit contemporary Native arts exhibition, which will offer prizes in categories including Best of Show, Honoring the Northwest, and People's Choice. There will also be an accompanying festival in August, co-hosted by the History Museum and Tacoma Art Museum, featuring dancing, drumming, a fashion show, vendors, and more.

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