Is there a better musical about poverty, resistance, and police overreach than Les Misérables? Find out at its Seattle production, running from June 7–17 at the Paramount. Matthew Murphy
Our music critics have already chosen the 32 best music shows this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn to pick the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks in every genre—from Glazer's PhotoFest to the NW New Works Festival, and from Negroni Week to the final week of the Seattle International Film Festival. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

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Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

FILM

Albatross
Setting out to document the devastation of plastic pollution on birds on a North Pacific atoll, the filmmakers (with activist/photographer Manuel Maqueda) were so awed by the live albatrosses that the scenes of natural beauty became the focus of the film. You'll still have your environmental consciousness raised, but you'll also witness the happy side of the cycle of life. This screening of the film from Seattle-based photographer and filmmaker Chris Jordan will be presented by the Ingraham High School Environmental Club in partnership with the World Affairs Council and the Seattle Public Schools International Education Department. Later in the week on World Oceans Day (June 8), the film will also be shown at the UN.

READINGS & TALKS

Ken Jennings: Planet Funny
Planet Funny: How Comedy Took Over Our Culture examines the pervasive and sometimes pernicious degree to which comedy has evolved from an entertainment category into the dominant mode of public and private expression among humans. The insights are sharp, witty, and sometimes startling. Jennings is equally adept at citing Cicero and Allen Funt, at zooming in on the inflation of jokes-per-minute in the past 40 years of sitcoms or spinning out on the relationship between Twitter—with its weird split screen of casual cruelty humor and performed hypersensitivity—and the election of certain presidents. Like any honest book published in 2018, Planet Funny does ever so slightly make you want to jump off a bridge. The way only a good book can. Jennings is neither condemning nor celebrating, but his angle on the comedification of discourse has complex implications—particularly if you've spent a lifetime investing in the view of yourself as a funny person. SEAN NELSON

Khaled A. Beydoun: American Islamophobia
The US Supreme Court is hearing arguments about the constitutionality of President Donald Trump's various Muslims bans as I write this, the Southern Poverty Law Center recently reported that the rise of hate crimes against Muslims has doubled in the last two years, and yet still I hear people denying the reality of Islamophobia in the United States. If you're somehow confused about this issue, or you know someone who is, consider listening to race theorist and law professor Khaled A. Beydoun read from his book, American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear. He'll cover the history of Islamophobia in the country, "from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South, to the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens, to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam." He'll also be available to address all your conspiratorial concerns about secret Islamic plots to replace the constitution with Sharia law. RICH SMITH

MONDAY-SUNDAY

ART

All Power: Visual Legacies of the Black Panther Party
This exhibition of photographs, from Michelle Dunn Marsh and Negarra A. Kudumu's 2016 book of the same title, undermines the popular idea that the Black Panther aesthetic was limited to "gun-toting, well-dressed black men with berets and gun-toting, well-dressed women with Afros." Contemporary photographers and visual artists—including locals like Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes and Christopher Paul Jordan, as well as nationally celebrated figures like Endia Beal and Carrie Mae Weems—flesh out themes of black identity, anti-racist resistance, and cultural, spiritual, and intellectual iconographies that reach far beyond surface-level militant chic. Through art, the curators hope to turn our focus to the Black Panther Party's cultural and societal ambitions and demands: freedom, justice, shelter, education, employment, and safety from police violence. Gain a more cogent appreciation of how aesthetic beauty can strengthen the art of protest. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Sunday

FILM

Seattle International Film Festival 2018
The 44th annual Seattle International Film Festival is the largest film festival in the United States, with more than 400 films (spread over 25 days) watched by around 150,000 people. It's impressively grand and one of the most exciting and widely attended arts events Seattle has to offer. Highlights this year include the opening film, Isabel Coixet's The Bookshop starring Emily Mortimer; Sorry to Bother You, musician Boots Riley's debut about a black telemarketer (Lakeith Stanfield) who discovers he has a magical power; and Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot, a Gus Van Sant comedy-drama starring Joaquin Phoenix as the Portland cartoonist John Callahan.

FOOD & DRINK

Negroni Week 2018
The refreshingly bitter, glowing-crimson aperitif, made with equal parts gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth and garnished with an orange peel, is so beloved, it now has its own week. Bars all over Seattle—including Outlier, Liberty, Bar del Corso, Babirusa, and Ba Bar—will be shaking up their own variations of the ruby-red cocktail to benefit charitable organizations, such as Arbor Day Foundation, Little Free Library, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, PAWS, and Surfrider Foundation. If the concept of gulping Negronis to combat the world’s ills sounds too good to be true, you’re probably right: As Stranger food writer Angela Garbes wrote in 2016, “Started in 2013 by Campari and Imbibe magazine, Negroni Week is most definitely a marketing ploy benefitting a global corporation. Feel free to plot the overthrow of our corporate power regime as you throw back another Negroni.” JULIANNE BELL

TUESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

aMaurice Winemaker Dinner
The family-owned Walla Walla winery aMaurice will visit Renee Erickson's adorable Fremont small plates restaurant for a night of wine paired with the Whale Wins' signature wood-fired fare. Wine will be available by the taste, glass, or bottle, and there will be special to-go pricing for the night.

PERFORMANCE

Crossdresser for Christ
For one night only, RuPaul's Drag Race favorite Ginger Minj will bring her autobiographical musical comedy, Crossdresser for Christ, to Seattle for the first time. Join the "Comedy Queen of the South" as she recalls her "relig-ish" journey from her Floridian Southern Baptist upbringings—where she endured "hell and damnation shoved down her throat"—and her search for alternative answers. (All of which will be expressed through song and dance, natch.)

TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY

PERFORMANCE

An Evening of Shakespeare
I hear the Plague was just awful, but without it we wouldn't have the finest collection of sonnets in the English language. When disease swept through Europe, the theaters were forced to shut down, which gave Shakespeare some time to write about love poems about a beautiful young man and also about a "dark lady." While the romantic poems must be cherished forever, the jealousy-filled sonnets dripping with hate and sadness and darkness are to be cherished even more. They're not quoted as often, but they absolutely should be. Hopefully UW faculty member Bridget Conners and her drama student actors will give us some of the mean ones in addition to some classic monologues and beloved scenes from Shakespeare's body of work. RICH SMITH

TUESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Come Back with a Warrant
Ten acclaimed artists, including Museum of Modern Art and Met-exhibited Tony Fitzpatrick, Terry Gilliam-beloved Lou Beach, and Chicago Art Institute alumna Yulia Kuznetsova, are exhibiting collages that range from cartoonish to mystical to pop cultural, all showing diverse possibilities for the medium.
Closing Saturday

Sean Gallagher: Loud Seas & Warm Lands
Fully titled Loud Seas and Warm Lands: Adapting to Changes in the Arctic and made using traditional tools, Sean Gallagher's show explores Arctic life, human and animal, in the anthropogenic age, as well as the fight for climate justice.
Closing Saturday

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

REVOLVE!
This exhibition is a celebration of the numinous and imaginary, with work by Michelle Anderst, Patricia Ariel, Carrie Ann Baade, Oliver Benson, Marlene Seven Bremner, Kim Evans, William Fahey, Don Farrell, Dean Fleming, Meesha Goldberg, Mark Henson, Martina Hoffmann, Brigid Marlin, Patrick McGrath Muñiz, Otto Rapp, Anthony Santella, Roku Sasaki, Carol Spicuzza, Miguel Tio, and Liba WS.
Closing Sunday

PERFORMANCE

The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Says my source: "This musical, while it has all of the goods from the Disney movie, is not an adaptation of the Disney film. It stays more true to the book and is darker than the Disney film. This will be directed by Glenn Casale, who directed The Little Mermaid for us." God, The Little Mermaid at the 5th Avenue was so good. In 2016 in Sacramento, deaf actor John McGinty played the role of Quasimodo—which was "the first time a deaf actor has played the role," according to the Sacramento Bee. Quasimodo is deaf. Deaf actor Joshua M. Castille will play the role in Seattle. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

WEDNESDAY

FILM

Three Dollar Bill Wednesday: Local Produce
Watch the best local short films from TWIST: Seattle Queer Film Festival and Translations: Seattle Transgender Film Festival.

FOOD & DRINK

Author Talk: Breaking Bread with Martin Philip
Bread baking is a special kind of magic: The alchemy of transforming the simplest ingredients into something so essential and nourishing never ceases to astonish me. “Bread shaman” Martin Philip’s new book, Breaking Bread, which details how to make everything from sourdough to baguettes to bagels and cinnamon buns, is a paean to this near-spiritual practice. Philip left his cushy New York finance job to work as an entry-level baker at the esteemed King Arthur Flour in rural Vermont. Today, he’s risen (heh) to the top as head bread baker. Tonight, he’ll demonstrate a recipe, talk about bread and King Arthur Flour, and sign copies of the book purchased on-site. JULIANNE BELL

READINGS & TALKS

Silent Reading Party
The silent-reading party turns nine years old in 2018. For almost a decade, people have been gathering in the Fireside Room of the Sorrento Hotel to escape the distractions of the city, and the distractions of their cell phones, to read silently to themselves in overstuffed chairs or couches in front of the fire while waiters bring them things and Paul Moore plays exquisite piano. It’s an odd phenomenon—nothing happens—but it’s as popular as ever. At last month’s party, there was a line out the door. Get there at least an hour early for prime seating. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY

FILM

Jaws—In Concert
Plunge in again to the ne plus ultra of creature features in a whole new way: with the John Williams score played lived by the Seattle Symphony.

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Mac Beth
An adaptation of the Shakespeare play that dare not speak its name inside a theater, Erica Schmidt’s reimagining grows out of high-school students discovering the text after school and gradually coming to inhabit the characters, language, and grisly thematic deathscape. Macbeth is all about the toxicity of ambition, a moral framework that is always valuable to revisit. It’s also rare among Shakespeare's plays in that the female lead is actually the best part in the whole show by a mile. It’s intriguing to think of what an all-female cast will make of both the work itself and the act of claiming it. SEAN NELSON

THURSDAY

ART

First Thursday Art Walk
Once a month, Seattleites flock to the streets in Pioneer Square for a chance to stroll, sip on booze, and attend as many art openings as possible at First Thursday. It's the city's central and oldest art walk, and takes place in a historic neighborhood known for its abundance of galleries. Wine and hobnobbing will steal the scene for some, but at its core, it's an impressive communal unveiling of new artwork. In June, check out special events like Alexander Miller and Alexander Nagy: Spacefillers and Party Hat Pride: Live Print Party + Queer Pop Up, plus opening receptions for Coley Mixan: F.I.B.E.R. Earth-Bound Training Center, Jun Kaneko: Visual Language, Alexander Keyes: the unutterable hideousness that can dwell in absolute silence and barren immensity, Carmi Weingrod: Agnes, Matthew Ryan Herget: I See Better With My Eyes Closed, a painting and mandala installation from Zac Culler and Lisa Golightly, Anastacia-Reneé: Poetry in a Time of Chaos, Evan Cohen: VISIONS, Joan Miró: Etchings & Lithographs, Masters of Disguise IV: Group Mask Exhibition, and Nadia Gohar: Foundation Deposits.

FOOD & DRINK

Cafe Campagne Annual Drink Pink
Tucked away in Post Alley, legendary bistro Cafe Campagne has been serving up French comfort food since 1994. And for 14 years running, they’ve celebrated their annual "Drink Pink" event in said alley with a variety of seasonal rosé, so you can guzzle pink wine on their picturesque patio and pretend you’re in Paris. They'll have rosé by the glass and the bottle, as well as food available for purchase. JULIANNE BELL

You Can't Eat Mount Rainier Dinner
In 1955, Seattle Times columnist and "self-made historian" William C. Speidel (known for inventing the Seattle Underground tour) wrote a book called You Can't Eat Mount Rainier, a tour of the Northwest’s mid-century-era restaurants, recipes, and food. It’s a time capsule and vintage gem, replete with delightfully kitschy illustrations and Seattle chefs’ recipes for dishes like cheese fondue dip and deep-dish apple pie, as well as cocktails with names like Pink Squirrel and Tom & Jerry. (I mean, what’s not to love about a book that has a category for “special ambrosias”?) This throwback, seven-course meal from chef Eric Rivera, the mastermind behind the pop-up addo, will take its cues from the book to re-create its vintage recipes from mostly bygone Seattle restaurants. If you’ve ever been curious about what Northwest food tasted like in the 1950s, this is your chance to find out. JULIANNE BELL

READINGS & TALKS

Alexandra Fuller: Quiet Until the Thaw
In Alexandra Fuller's Quiet Until the Thaw, two Native American cousins from Lakota Oglala Sioux Nation, South Dakota, disagree about whether to respond to injustices committed against their people with peace or violence.

Roseann Lake: Leftover in China
Economist correspondent Roseann Lake will discuss her book about successful unmarried women over 25 in China, also referred to as "leftover" women.

THURSDAY-FRIDAY

COMEDY

8 to 6
In what will probably be a cathartic improv show, three women in the workplace take revenge on their awful chauvinist boss according to your suggestions.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

​How I Learned to Drive
Paula Vogel won the Pulitzer Prize for this intense drama about trauma, manipulation, and freedom. Li'l Bit is our narrator, guiding us through memories of her scarred childhood and adolescence. The title refers to her driving lessons with Uncle Peck, a monstrous yet pathetic (and believable) man who molests her over the years with his wife's knowledge. Winding through past and present scenes, Li'l Bit makes us understand how her personality was warped by these atrocious acts—yet how Uncle Peck paradoxically gave her the tools to free herself.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Satpreet Kahlon: A slow unraveling of the same thread (and the universal tragedy of time)
Stranger art critic Emily Pothast has written: "Satpreet Kahlon creates beautiful installations in striking, sumptuous materials that call into question the unseen boundaries and tacit assumptions that permeate art-world dynamics, often incorporating a critique of how the exhibition venues that show her work are complicit in these systems." Though she's primarily a sculptor, her latest work is a video projection.
Closing Sunday

PERFORMANCE

Les Misérables
Is there a better musical about poverty, resistance, and police overreach than Les Misérables? Is there a better song about unrequited love than “On My Own,” the number Eponine sings while walking through Paris? Is there a more vivid, sexed-up cheapskate than Thenardier? (Okay, maybe Trump. But at least Thenardier has a sense of humor about his awfulness.) Les Misérables is one of the undefeated musicals of our time. Yes, it’s a bit treacly, and, yes, it’s very Christian, but it still works, and it’s more stirring as a live performance than as a movie. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE
No performance on Friday

Love & Ballet
This quartet of performances is going to have you swooning and bawling while thinking of her or him or them in the corner of your mind. With music by Sufjan Stevens, Justin Peck's Year of the Rabbit will bring a burst of cheerleader-like joy. But everything else is going to melt your heart. Benjamin Millepied's Appassionata returns with Beethoven's stormy score and its breathtaking, crazy-in-love-right-now pas de deux. Christopher Wheeldon's aquatic love songs, After the Rain pas de deux and Tide Harmonic, will round out the evening nicely. There's a moment in After the Rain where the female dancer does Kate Winslet's Titanic thing while balancing on the thigh of the male dancer, which is a feat worth the price of admission. And to add to this pile of feelings, this run of shows will be the penultimate time you'll get to see Karel Cruz leap across the stage like a gazelle. He'll retire from Pacific Northwest Ballet at the Season Encore Performance on June 10, after performing the pas de deux from Alexei Ratmansky's Don Quixote with his wife, principal dancer Lindsi Dec. <3 RICH SMITH

O+E: Love's Journey to Hell and Back
For the sake of keeping up with the kids and bringing opera to the people, every year Seattle Opera does an English-language chamber piece that's normally cooler and more modern than the stuff they run on the main stage, and every year it's good. This time they're producing an all-women version of Christoph Gluck's Orpheus and Eurydice, a retelling of the famous Greek myth about trust and faithfulness that birthed the great tradition of lyric poetry in the West. In Gluck's version, O hallucinates at her dying wife E's bedside as A (Amore) intervenes to save the wounded woman's life. Stage director Kelly Kitchens, who is no stranger to all-women productions in Seattle, says in press materials that she chose a Sapphic interpretation of Orpheus and Eurydice "because love is universal and this story belongs to all of us." RICH SMITH
No performance on Friday

Practical Questions of Wholeness
This program will alternate between John Cameron Mitchell's Hedwig and the Angry Inch and Lanie Robertson's Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill, two musicals about identity and its fracturing. Hedwig, interspersed with glam rock numbers, is about an East German trans singer touring the US in the wake of a botched surgery; Lady Day portrays Billie Holiday as she prepares for one of her final concerts. Mathew Wright (The Nance) will direct Hedwig, and founding artistic director of the Hansberry Project Valerie Curtis-Newton will direct Lady Day, starring Felicia V. Loud.

Seattle International Dance Festival
For 16 days, dancers from around the world (and some local stars) will perform in indoor and outdoor venues. Some events will be free and all-ages. In general, the focus is on innovation and diversity—expect to be inspired and occasionally unnerved.

Smoked!
Ray Tagavilla will star in an Eastwood-esque tribute to the Western, in which an ace shooter arrives in the town of Sauget to defend a farmer accused of "eco-terrorism." Paul Budraitis will direct a production that's paired with Chef Erin Brindley's four-course meal.

FRIDAY

FILM

'Hereditary' Opening
No one wants to divulge too much of Ari Aster's new movie, so we'll just say that it's about a terrible family secret that comes out after the death of an elusive matriarch. Everyone from the A.V. Club to Vanity Fair has called it traumatic and tragic, even downright "evil," and horror fans are stoked.

'Ocean's 8' Opening
A tremendous cast—Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Mindy Kaling, Sarah Paulson, Awkwafina, Rihanna, and Helena Bonham Carter—plays another team pulling off the perfect heist, this time at the Met Gala.

Won't You Be My Neighbor?
Remember how badly you miss Mr. Rogers as you watch this documentary about the TV host, Presbyterian minister, and public broadcasting champion's ethics and influence.

FOOD & DRINK

Ivar’s Ponzi Vineyard Wine Dinner featuring Copper River Salmon
It's Copper River salmon season, and chefs everywhere are preparing menus showcasing the famous fish. For Ivar's Salmon House's annual wine dinner, executive chef James Somerville will present a multi-course menu with hoisin-sambal glazed Copper River salmon, sockeye salad niçoise, seared Copper River king, and deconstructed lemon meringue pie. Anna Maria Ponzi, the president, director of marketing, and co-owner of Ponzi Vineyards, will present pairings to go with each course and discuss the winery's "live certified sustainable" status.

READINGS & TALKS

Paige Lewis and Kaveh Akbar
Poetry power couple Paige Lewis and Kaveh Akbar are getting married the day after this reading. In celebration of their eternal love and affection, they've assembled a group of their friends to bless their nuptials and swell the hearts of all in the room. Their "friends," by the way, just happen to be some of the best contemporary writers in the country. I mean, holy shit: Danez Smith (Don’t Call Us Dead), Angel Nafis (BlackGirl Mansion), Hanif Abdurraqib (They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us), Fatimah Asghar (If They Come For Us). RICH SMITH

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Michael Kenna: Abruzzo and Other New Work
Michael Kenna of England will show new photographs. His work often makes use of long exposures to tease out unusual facets of natural and manmade landscapes all around the world.
Opening Friday

PERFORMANCE

NW New Works Festival
For two weekends every year in June, On the Boards transforms into an open studio for the most gifted theater-makers, dancers, and performance artists in the region. Some of the more promising works-in-progress this year include a new piece by hilarious Portland-based dancer Allie Hankins, a solo show about "a daughter’s quest to know her deceased mother and the plastic surgeon who killed her" by Seattle comedian Susan Lieu, an interrogation of the "Western gender binary" from the perspective of Yoruba deities by Seattle's Kiana Harris, a deep dive into "pleasure and shame" by Canada's Pam Tzeng, a weirde treatment of an old witch story by local production company The Horse in Motion, and a multimedia meditation on coincidence by Rainbow Fletcher. All performances are approximately twenty minutes long, and it's fun to try to figure out which of the shows is going to take the world by storm in the coming years. RICH SMITH

Transfigurate
Transfigurate, the final performance in Whim W'Him's 2017–2018 season, will boast three new works by Danielle Agami (formerly of Batsheva), Pascal Touzeau (ex-Ballet Frankfurt), and, as always, Whim W'Him's artistic director Olivier Wevers.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

My Fair Lady
Douchey professor Henry Higgins will once again turn Cockney flower seller Eliza Doolittle into a lady—but find her more than he can handle—in this staging of the Lerner and Loewe musical.

Until the Flood
To create this one-act solo show about the shooting of Michael Brown, theater-maker Dael Orlandersmith conducted hours of interviews with 60 to 80 citizens of Ferguson, Missouri. "I let them talk, I let them talk," Orlandersmith said in an interview to Milwaukee Rep. What emerged from those conversations is this collection of powerful recollections, one that ultimately demands the end of the slaughter of black men in the streets of St. Louis and everywhere else, and one that offers some practical solutions for how we might best accomplish that goal. If you've never seen Orlandersmith perform, you should know she wields a no-nonsense delivery that pins you to your chair and forces you to listen. Get ready. RICH SMITH

SATURDAY

ART

Dori Hana Scherer: Nostalgia for naught
Artist Scherer adapts the graphic style of Seattle Parks and Recreation to create a "a sort of visual and psychical game" of signage and change.
Closing Saturday

Georgetown Carnival
Spend the day playing carnival games, dancing to live music from local bands like Selene Vigil, Stag, Sky Cries Mary, the Black Tones, Freddy Trujillo, and others, making arts and crafts, hanging out in a beer garden, and more.

Long Shot 2018
On June 16, one image from every person who participates in today's 24-hour photo shoot contest Long Shot will be exhibited at a pop-up gallery. Anyone around the world is welcome to submit images from any type of camera.The theme of this year's exhibit is "Chase the Light."

Natasha Marin: Black Imagination
Conceptual artist and anti-racist activist Natasha Marin has been working on her Black Imagination series in various galleries around town, focusing on "sustainable digital and IRL communities through creative engagement, modes of connection, and methods of encounter." She'll show the work she's created as artist-in-residence at this studio, projected on the High Wall.

COMEDY

ASSBUTTS (Amazing Super Spectacular Bold Unscripted Terrific Theater Show)
Some of the city's finest performers will collaborate on instantaneous comedy scenes, with a different lineup every Saturday, in Mandy Price's ASSBUTTS. Don't be surprised if it gets a little vulgar. Or extremely vulgar.

FILM

Home Movies: Filmmakers Document Their Families
What happens when filmmakers turn their cameras on their own families? This series, curated by Brian Belovarac, focuses on a trend that began in the 1970s with the invention of portable 8mm filmmaking equipment. See films by everyone from Andy Warhol to China's Liu Jiayin by way of Belgian experimentalist Chantal Akerman and the American Nelson Mandela Award winner Thomas Allen Harris.

FOOD & DRINK

Brewshed Beer Fest
Washington Wild's Brewshed Alliance partners—including Brewmaster's Taproom, Latona Pub, PicoBrew, Watershed Pub & Kitchen, and Flatstick Pub—will pour over 40 beers.

Mexican Bakery Workshop
Mariela Camacho slings rad Latin American-inspired baked goods at her pop-up Comadre Panaderia at Amandine Bakeshop each month. At this three-hour workshop, she'll school students in how to craft piña empanadas (flaky dough filled with rum-spiked pineapple with Mexican vanilla and star-anise sugar), conchas (brioche dough with a cookie-like topping), and breakfast empanadas (pastry stuffed with savory nopal, queso, and soft scrambled eggs). Enjoy Baron Brothers Coffee and tea by Big Heart Tea Co. along with your baked goods. Proceeds will be donated to Mision Mexico, which "provides a loving, secure family home for children of all ages who have been abused, neglected, orphaned or abandoned, and mostly from backgrounds of extreme poverty."

Sunsets in Snohomish
Walk around the historic neighborhood sampling regional wines from participating shops.

READINGS & TALKS

Teach-In with Write Our Democracy
Writers of all kinds will gather for this quarterly Hugo House/Write Our Democracy event focusing on the power of the word to fight against cynicism and for liberty and justice. For the first hour, Seattle Civic Poet Anastacia-Reneé, writer/journalist Kristen Millares Young, and award-winning nonfiction writer Wendy Call will lead classes. Afterward, they'll read works.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Jini Dellaccio: Caught in the Act
Starting as a self-taught fashion photographer in California, Jini Dellaccio (1917–2014) was one of those right place, right time photographers. A teaching job brought her to the Northwest in the 1960s, where she was asked to capture the essence and energy of proto-grunge bands like the Sonics and the Wailers, as well as the wide-eyed winsomeness of Seattle native Merrilee Rush (“Angel of the Morning”). The first female rock-and-roll photographer, Dellaccio (who said in an interview that she didn’t know she was the first) also shot Neil Young, Mick Jagger, and the Who. KATIE KURTZ
Opening Saturday

PhotoFest
Glazer's PhotoFest will feature sales, free workshops, and photowalks.

SUNDAY

COMEDY

Hell Yeah
The joyously dark-humored trio composed of Anthony Householder, Elena Martinez, and Ethan Smith will bring their A-game. They'll be preceded by anarchic queer improv collective Light Waves.

PERFORMANCE

PNB Season Encore
Bid farewell to Cuban-born Karel Cruz, Principal Dancer at Pacific Northwest Ballet, who's been with the ballet company since 2002. He'll perform a few last dances, including the pas de deux from Swan Lake, for which he'll be partnered with his wife, Lindsi Dec.

READINGS & TALKS

Ellen Forney: Rock Steady
Forney's wonderful cartoons have enhanced The Stranger's pages for years. Her new book, Rock Steady: Brilliant Advice from My Bipolar Life, "serves as a practical (and extremely useful) follow-up to Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me, her memoir about being diagnosed with bipolar disorder," according to Rich Smith.

Looking Back at Forward Thrust: A Community Conversation Hosted by Shaun Scott
A little history lesson: Activist Jim Ellis pushed for civic change with a number of ballot initiatives called Forward Thrust from 1968 to 1970, and that's partly why we have so many lovely parks, pools, and playgrounds. Historian Shaun Scott invites you to revisit Forward Thrust in the light of the city's new needs, especially in terms of mass transit, at this Town Hall-sponsored conversation series.

Sarah Galvin, Marina Blitshteyn, Dan Hoy, Abraham Smith, and Samantha Zighelboim
Seattle poet/essayist/occasional Stranger contributor Sarah Galvin will share her poems with fellow greats Marina Blitshteyn, Dan Hoy, Abraham Smith, and Samantha Zighelboim.