Local chefs from restaurants like Lark and Le Petit Cochon will duke it out to concoct the ultimate lamb dish at Sunday's Lamb Jam competition and tasting event.
Our music critics have already chosen the 45 best music shows this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn to recommend the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks in every genre—from the Seattle Pride Parade (and other events like Dungeons & Drag Queens and Alaska Thunderfuck at the Queer/Bar Pride Festival) to a one-act solo show about the shooting of Michael Brown (Until the Flood), and from the Shake Shack x Canlis Pop-Up to Best of SIFF. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

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Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

READINGS & TALKS

A Reading for Refugees
Seattle poets and prose writers are showing up for refugees from Iraq and Syria, of whom, the organizers say, the US has accepted 29 and 11, respectively. Judy Oldfield, Matt Muth, Richard Chiem, Jekeva Phillips, Katie Lee Ellison, and Kamilla Kafiyeva will bring the slam and verses, while you can bring your dollars and your appetite for coffee and chocolate. The shop will be donating a portion of their sales to the Collateral Repair Project, which aids refugees in Amman, Jordan.

Shirley MacLaine
In an age when the words “iconic” and “legendary” are trotted out to modify shoes and sandwiches, language pales before the greatness of Shirley MacLaine. Though she endured a certain amount of punch-line derision for the more woo-woo elements in her 1983 book Out on a Limb, no one has ever impugned her gifts as a trouper. She is one of the last of the old line of people who became stars by dint of will and versatility—she sings like magic, dances like a dervish, and is equally adept at broad comedy and intimate drama. She was Fran Kubelik. She was Aurora Greenway. She was Doris Mann. She was Ouiser Boudreaux. I have no idea what she’s going to talk about at this event, but the career she’s had guarantees at least a few lifetimes' worth of unforgettable stories. SEAN NELSON

MONDAY-TUESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Michael Bennett: Things That Make White People Uncomfortable
Former Stranger editor-in-chief Tricia Romano called Michael Bennett "the best Seahawk," and for good reason. In addition to being a Super Bowl champ, a three-time Pro Bowler, and one of the best defensive ends in the country, Michael Bennet is a powerful voice in the Black Lives Matter movement, and also a fucking hilarious person. (Remember that time he stole a police bike and rode it around CenturyLink stadium to celebrate winning the 2015 NFC championship?) In his new memoir Things that Make White People Uncomfortable, co-written by Dave Zirin, Bennett recounts the path that led him to where he is now and articulates his thoughts about racial dynamics in the country. Though the title seems confrontational, he knows what he's doing with it. “I believe you need to be uncomfortable to become comfortable with different people,” he told Lois Nam at the Undefeated. RICH SMITH

MONDAY-THURSDAY

FILM

Best of SIFF
Missed Seattle International Film Festival audience favorites? They’ll be screened again, along with the award winners.

MONDAY-FRIDAY

ART

Americans Interned: A Family's Story of Social Injustice
Executive Order 9066 authorized the expulsion of Japanese Americans from the West Coast during the Second World War. Two artists, Chris and Jan Hopkins, tell the stories of some of those harmed by this human rights violation.
Opening reception on Thursday

MONDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

​How I Learned to Drive
Paula Vogel won the Pulitzer Prize for this intense drama about trauma, manipulation, and freedom. Li'l Bit is our narrator, guiding us through memories of her scarred childhood and adolescence. The title refers to her driving lessons with Uncle Peck, a monstrous yet pathetic (and believable) man who molests her over the years with his wife's knowledge. Winding through past and present scenes, Li'l Bit makes us understand how her personality was warped by these atrocious acts—yet how Uncle Peck paradoxically gave her the tools to free herself.
No performance on Tuesday or Wednesday.

TUESDAY

COMEDY

Ron Funches
Watch any Ron Funches clip on YouTube, or go to one of his live sets, and if you’re not in love with his gentle, quirky observations and off-kilter, ganja-logic transitions, you need to reassess your worldview. Dude is one of the funniest humans on Earth now. Funches may have lost a lot of weight recently, but rest assured: He’s still punching well above it with his endlessly unpredictable thoughts about whatever absurdities pop into his pot-enhanced mind. (“I like marijuana. It’s like getting a hug on your insides.”) This performance will be filmed for a TV special. DAVE SEGAL

READINGS & TALKS

Clarion West Presents: Daniel Abraham
You may best know Daniel Abraham as the writer/executive producer of the The Expanse, which Charles Mudede hailed as "a masterpiece of TV sci-fi." But he's also written books under three different names: MLN Hanover for urban fantasy, James S. A. Corey for futuristic sci-fi, and his own name for epic fantasy. Tonight, he'll read new work and answer questions about his craft.

UNCODE: Storytellers Juneteenth: Stories of Freedom and Emancipation
Mark Juneteenth with black comedians, theater artists, and storytellers who'll tell true stories about getting free, including "in dating, relocation, religion, career change and other life-altering events." The speakers will include the extremely funny Monisa Brown, beloved musician SassyBlack, Jennifer Glover, Kalim TA, Zikora Odiaka, and Donny Johnson.

TUESDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

Seattle International Dance Festival
For 16 days, dancers from around the world (and some local stars) will perform in indoor and outdoor venues. Some events will be free and all-ages. In general, the focus is on innovation and diversity—expect to be inspired and occasionally unnerved.

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Mac Beth
An adaptation of the Shakespeare play that dare not speak its name inside a theater, Erica Schmidt’s reimagining grows out of high school students discovering the text after school and gradually coming to inhabit the characters, language, and grisly thematic deathscape. Macbeth is all about the toxicity of ambition, a moral framework that is always valuable to revisit. It’s also rare among Shakespeare's plays in that the female lead is actually the best part in the whole show by a mile. It’s intriguing to think of what an all-female cast will make of both the work itself and the act of claiming it. SEAN NELSON

Until the Flood
To create this one-act solo show about the shooting of Michael Brown, theater-maker Dael Orlandersmith conducted hours of interviews with 60 to 80 citizens of Ferguson, Missouri. "I let them talk, I let them talk," Orlandersmith said in an interview to Milwaukee Rep. What emerged from those conversations is this collection of powerful recollections, one that ultimately demands the end of the slaughter of black men in the streets of St. Louis and everywhere else, and one that offers some practical solutions for how we might best accomplish that goal. If you've never seen Orlandersmith perform, you should know she wields a no-nonsense delivery that pins you to your chair and forces you to listen. Get ready. RICH SMITH

WEDNESDAY

FILM

Human Flow
Human Flow, the staggeringly gargantuan look at the global refugee crisis from Chinese director and activist Ai Weiwei, takes a subject that could consume a documentarian’s entire career and seemingly attempts to get it all in one go. While the constant stream of jaw-dropping imagery can sometimes feel like a case of Too Much Information, the sheer macro power of the visuals packs a wallop. Shot in more than 20 countries, and utilizing more than 200 crew members, Ai’s mammoth passion project travels between overpopulated crisis points around the world, pausing only briefly for interviews with refugees and aid workers. The Google Earth-style views of huge masses of people on the move never stop being absolutely dumbfounding. ANDREW WRIGHT

READINGS & TALKS

Angela Garbes with Anika Anand
One of the finest writers who ever worked at this newspaper, Garbes (author of “The More I Learn About Breast Milk, the More Amazed I Am,” the 2015 story that broke our website’s traffic records) presents her first book, an investigative reflection on an aspect of childbirth that receives surprisingly little attention from the medical establishment or the baby book publishing industry: the mental and physical health of the mother. "Your OB will cautiously quote statistics; online sources will scare you with conflicting and often inaccurate information; and even the most trusted books will offer information with a heavy dose of judgment. To educate herself, the food and culture writer embarked on an intensive journey of exploration, diving into the scientific mysteries and cultural myths that surround motherhood to find answers to her questions that had only previously been given through a lens of what women ought to do-instead of allowing them the freedom to choose the right path themselves." SEAN NELSON

Looking Back at Forward Thrust: A Community Conversation Hosted by Shaun Scott
A little history lesson: Activist Jim Ellis pushed for civic change with a number of ballot initiatives called Forward Thrust from 1968 to 1970, and that's partly why we have so many lovely parks, pools, and playgrounds. Historian Shaun Scott invites you to revisit Forward Thrust in the light of the city's new needs, especially in terms of mass transit, at this Town Hall-sponsored conversation series.

Natalie Goldberg: Let the Whole Thundering World Come Home
In Let the Whole Thundering World Come Home, Natalie Goldberg (author of Writing Down the Bones and Wild Mind) shares her experience with CLL, a potentially fatal form of blood cancer. What's more, while she's navigating hospitals, doctors, and medication, her partner is also diagnosed with cancer, and together they find ways to enjoy life and help each other heal.

Peter Rubin: Future Presence
This Wired senior editor's book exposes the possibilities of virtual reality and its effects on relationships, work, and entertainment.

Susan Carr: The Rat Tree
Seattle’s pre-eminent voice instructor follows up her novel The Ballad of Desiree with this illustrated story set in 1950s Portland, in which “a big family of grandparents, parents, aunts, uncles and cousins gather for their annual summer pool party. As the sun shines on the family, two young cousins explore the attic of the mill where grandfather stores his tools, trunks and secrets. In a locked trunk they find clues to his hidden Nazi past and generations of abuse.” SEAN NELSON

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Viola Frey: The Future of Yesterday
This solo exhibition brings together six drawings and three sculptures by California artist Viola Frey spanning from 1975 to 1997. A student of Richard Diebenkorn and Mark Rothko, Frey worked largely in ceramics—often towering, imaginatively fashioned statues of clothed and unclothed humans, each of which seems to possess a personality. The sculptures at this gallery are much smaller, but the sturdy homunculi of, for example, Western Civilization Diptych #1, have more soul and beauty than their rough surfaces and simple, indented eyes suggest. In some of her most striking two-dimensional images, powerfully built nude women loom over puppet-like men in suits, an interesting inversion of the naked, vulnerable woman-as-object so important to the Western figurative tradition. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Saturday

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

2018 University of Washington MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition
Every year, the UW's MFA program deposits a cohort of emerging artists into the local scene. This year's crop includes Nate Clark, who uses woven materials as a stand-in for networks and structures, and Caitlin Wilson, whose large-scale paintings are evocative of Cy Twombly, Mark Tobey, and Emily Gherard. Alex Kang uses technology to explore the heartbreak of losing information in translation, while Katie Schroeder uses it to focus on identity, belonging, and the curation of our surroundings. Other artists include Lacy Bockhoff, David Burr, Ian Cooper, Daniel Hewat, Erin Meyer, and Christian Alborz Oldham. Catch their work before they finish school and can no longer afford to live here. EMILY POTHAST
Closing Sunday

Locally Sourced
This exhibition pokes fun at the hippie-ish NW obsession with local sourcing, "whether in reference to fresh produce, or to where people were born and raised." Lisa Myers Bulmash, Carletta Carrington Wilson, Susan Ringstad Emery, and Bernadette Merikle—four women artists of color—will use this as a jumping-off point for understanding attitudes toward who "belongs" here.
Closing Sunday

PERFORMANCE

The Picture of Dorian Gray
Book-It Repertory Theatre will lend flesh and blood to an adaptation of Oscar Wilde's once-shocking, still creepy Victorian novel about a handsome but ruthless man whose debaucheries and degradations only cause his portrait, not his own body, to age. Chip Sherman (the Rep's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings) will star in this "gay suspense" play.

THURSDAY

ART

Light Work with Artist Mokedo
Video DJs, electronic musicians who use light visuals, and general light enthusiasts might enjoy meeting their peers in a "show and tell" class with PNW artists.

COMEDY

CAMP: Queer Improv
CAMP unites some of the funniest and LGBTQ+-est individuals in Seattle's improv scene: Andrew Weiss, Britney Barber, Graham Downing, Kinzie Shaw, and Mandy Price, all of whom are regulars or past cast members at Jet City Improv. They're totally unpredictable, hilariously inappropriate, and just plain weird. (A penis monastery made an appearance at their last show.) No surprise that they've been invited down to San Diego for the city's Pride Comedy Festival—see them in action before they head south.

Gender is a Joke 2: A GASS Fundraiser!
Queer comedians will inspire you to raise your voice in laughter and cheers while you raise money for the Gender Alliance of the South Sound. The lineup is a range of beautiful LGBTQ+ talent: the effortlessly acerbic Andy Iwancio, along with Lexi Haack, Mitch Mitchell, Nancy Jean Naly, Finn Cottom, Chocolate The Entertainer, and Max Delsohn.

FILM

David Lynch Movie Night: Blue Velvet Times Two
David Lynch tore the veil off the myth of Reagan’s America with this genuinely disturbing, funny, seedy, perverse, all-the-way-dark masterpiece about a young man (Kyle MacLachlan) who finds a severed ear on a lawn, then more or less climbs inside it to discover the seeds of evil that lurk beneath the perfectly trimmed lawns of his quaint Oregon town—and within himself, too. In a time when everyone seems to be arguing about what America once was and should be again, Blue Velvet is an essential reminder of what it is. SEAN NELSON

FOOD & DRINK

Author Talk: Booze & Vinyl by Tenaya and Andre Darlington
Inspired by the vinyl-soundtracked cocktail soirees their parents threw for friends while they were growing up, sibling author team Tenaya and Andre Darlington decided to bring back the listening party. So they wrote Booze and Vinyl, a compendium of more than 70 records from the 1950s to today with carefully curated cocktail pairings, ranging from watermelon coolers for the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds to a tequila Negroni for Beck’s Odelay, ideal for solo enjoyment or group listening parties alike. At their talk at Book Larder, you’ll get to try a cocktail from the book (accompanied by music, of course), and the authors will answer questions and sign copies purchased onsite. JULIANNE BELL

Molly Moon's Summer Seasonal Tasting
Forgo the gargantuan, block-wrapping lines and be the among the first to preview the upcoming summer flavors from the local ice cream chain, including strawberry shortcake, cherry chunk, s'mores, blackberry sorbet and vegan coconut raspberry, and sip sorbet cocktails. Plus, meet the Molly Moon's team, chefs, and local farm partners.

Rosé Solstice Soirée
On the longest day of the year, use that extra sunlight to your advantage with tastings of rosé from Tranche Cellars, Upsidedown Wine, aMaurice Cellars, Latta Wines, Ancestry Cellars, COR Cellars, Betz Family Winery, Cedergreen Cellars, Isenhower Cellars, and more. There'll also be food specials, raffles, and a live DJ.

Summer Rosé Party
Fremont's Red Door will greet the first day of summer with $5 glasses of rosé on their patio.

PERFORMANCE

Dungeons & Drag Queens Hang Ten: Pride 2018!
Gay nerds, rejoice! It's Dungeons & Dragons meets drag queens meets dungeon master Matt Baume, who is a prolific nerd with a keen eye for talent. This show, which is basically just a gaggle of the most beloved queens in town playing D&D for an audience, isn't a concept that should work, but it does. This excellently stupid line from the show's promo copy is a good example of what you can expect: "If you’re into role-play, henny, roll the dice and join us for the show that serves death drops, death saves, and drink specials to die for!" CHASE BURNS

National Treasures
An all-star lineup of mean insult comedy queen Bianca Del Rio (whom Stranger contributor called "the most vicious RuPaul's Drag Race winner of all time"), the infamous NYC nightclub star Lady Bunny, cheerfully offensive TV host Sherry Vine, and twisted celebrity impersonator Jackie Beat will take over Seattle for two hours. Experience vulgarity and glamor through the power of their drag combined.

Thriftease Pride 2018: Pop Art Pageant
A wise twink once described Mona Real as "what would happen if Divine walked into Fremont Vintage and came out with the whole store." There are few queens who serve thrift-shop fantasy like Mona Real, and Thriftease is Seattle's chance to finger around her closet (and take home the goods). Queer go-go queens and dive-bar divas will model vintage finds, curated by Real, and the audience will bid on the items—everything beginning at an affordable $1. Winning bids help the models strip down to their panties, so prepare for butts. CHASE BURNS

READINGS & TALKS

Colonizing Mars
A trio of billionaires have chosen to invest massive amounts of money into SpaceX, a program that would ostensibly help them colonize a foreign planet by 2024. David A. Weintraub, author of Life on Mars, What to Know Before We Go, will discuss the reasons why, of all the celestial bodies in our solar system, Mars appears to be the most habitable, and why some think Mars may already be inhabited.

Dr. Jordan Peterson
Depending on who you ask, Jordan Peterson is either a life-changing self-help guru who is saving young men from a future of video games and jerking off in their moms’ basements, or a huckster who is guiding the same young men toward nihilism, misogyny, and the racist alt-right. Whatever your opinion, the famed Canadian psychologist and best-selling author will be in Seattle for the second time in as many months. Is he a savior or is he a fraud? Perhaps the best way to find out is to listen, and judge, for yourself. KATIE HERZOG

Lit Fix 22: Summer Solstice
Lit Fix is Seattle's "dive-friendliest" reading and music series, which brings together books, bars, and bands all in one place. At this edition, you'll hear from writers Kristen Millares Young, Benjamin Schmitt, Garth Stein, the fantastic magical realist Anca Szilágyi, and musician J.R. Rhodes. Proceeds will benefit the Bureau of Greater Ideas.

Roxane Gay: Not That Bad
Roxane Gay, whose collection of essays, Bad Feminist, launched her into the public eye, is back with a new anthology, Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture, which includes authors and other figures both known and new, like actors Ally Sheedy and Gabrielle Union, and writers Amy Jo Burns, Lyz Lenz, Claire Schwartz, and Bob Shacochis. These essays are wide-ranging and include explorations of the impact of rape, harassment, and violence, but at heart they are all about what it is to be a woman in today's world. While sometimes it really is that bad, Gay, in person, is sure to deliver. KATIE HERZOG

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

The Last Starfighter
The idea that video games could be used as a recruitment tool by an alien race on the lookout for human teenage boys to help them fight off predators was ahead of its time, as was this cult 1984 sci-fi action comedy film, which featured the earliest examples of CGI known to cinema. How they’re going to make it work as a stage play is a pretty rich mystery, but if your affection for the movie runs as deep as it usually does (if you’ve heard of it, odds are it’s pretty special to you, as it was not a big hit at the time), it’s probably worth a trip to the Eastside to find out. SEAN NELSON

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

COMEDY

Kermet Apio
A road-tested veteran of stage, radio, and small screen, Seattle comic Kermet Apio has won the Great American Comedy Festival and Seattle Comedy Competition contests. Yet in some circles, he’s not very respected. Maybe that’s because Apio’s work lacks edginess and exudes an eminently palatable patina of middlebrow relatability. But within those narrow parameters, Apio excels in the profanity-free realms of family-oriented, self-deprecating humor. Sometimes we need clever truth bombs dropped about the lamentable condition known as being in your 40s or a riff on how absurd it seems now for students in 1970s-era grade-school art class to be making ashtrays. DAVE SEGAL

PERFORMANCE

Dragon Mama
Sara Porkalob's family saga, as seen in Madame Dragon and Dragon Lady, will continue with the story of Porkalob's mother Maria, seeking friends of color and queer love in Bremerton, WA. Considering Porkalob's prominence and talent as a performer and director, this may be your chance to catch the genesis of a show that will grow on other stages.

Practical Questions of Wholeness
It is impossible to forget the moment local singer and actor Felicia Loud entered the soul of mid-century jazz singer Billie Holiday in 2005 at Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute. It was amazing and deeply haunting. She resurrected a Holiday who is at the end of her life and performing in a small club, Emerson's Bar and Grill in South Philadelphia. Her liver is done with her. Her voice is broken. But Loud convincingly captured and expressed the aristocratic essence of the fallen American queen. This grace-in-the-gutter was, of course, the whole meaning of Lanie Robertson’s play Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill, now one half of the double bill Practical Questions of Wholeness (the other half is Hedwig and the Angry Inch). Loud, who reprised the role in 2009 at the Erickson Theatre Off Broadway, got it perfectly right. In the latest adaptation, Loud is directed by the talented Valerie Curtis-Newton. CHARLES MUDEDE

Queer/Bar Pride Festival
“I’m not afraid of losing fans or followers by saying the president is a reckless asshole,” Alaska Thunderfuck recently told Bust magazine. The drag queen known for adding many syllables to the word “hi” went on to say: “Men have thoroughly fucked up our planet. It’s time that women take over. Drag is the ritualistic worship of the divine feminine, and I’m happy to be a high priestess.” Other queens appearing in Queer/Bar’s three-day Pride weekend extravaganza include Trinity Taylor, Kameron Michaels, and Miss Vanjie. Hieeeeeeeee! CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

Smoked!
Ray Tagavilla will star in an Eastwood-esque tribute to the Western, in which an ace shooter arrives in the town of Sauget to defend a farmer accused of "eco-terrorism." Paul Budraitis will direct a production that's paired with Chef Erin Brindley's four-course meal.

FRIDAY

ART

For the Love of Plants
Nothing like flowers in spring to make creativity bloom after a dull winter. Buy prints and original works by Seattle artists that celebrate nature, flora, and the season. Your dollars will support both the art community and environmental education. Enjoy music and drinks in the Park's palace of plants.

FESTIVALS

Trans Pride Seattle
Gather with Trans Pride Seattle and the Gender Justice League to celebrate the Seattle trans community with a neighborhood march for family, friends, and allies, with a following party filled with performances of every genre. Enjoy live music during and after the parade by Shea Diamond, Laith Ashley, Seranine, Jade Vogelsang, Sunday Night Heat, Michete, Morgan Britt, Porch Cat, Venus Aoki, and DJ Gag Reflex, and comedy by local talents Andy Iwancio, DJ Martinez, and Max Delsohn.

FOOD & DRINK

Brave Horse Pride 2018
For a comfy, laid-back kind of pride celebration, sip some special-edition, unicorn-adorned, rainbow-emblazoned cans of Montucky Cold Snack, pop bottles of bubbly from Gruet, drink pride cans of House Wine, and snack on pride-themed food specials, all while lounging in the cozy gastropub ambience of Tom Douglas's Brave Horse Tavern. (Ordering one of their soft pretzels hot out of the wood-fired oven is highly encouraged.) The event will raise funds for Out in Front Seattle, an LGBTQ leadership development program whose mission is to “foster the development of effective, engaged, and passionate leaders in order to build a thriving lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community.”

Pig and Pink 2018
Greet summer with a pig roast and some picnic-perfect side dishes, accompanied by a selection of rosé available by the glass or bottle (including several from Magnum).

PERFORMANCE

BeautyBoiz Queer AF
If you crave an all-gender hoopla of vodka, drag, boylesque, aerial acts, and dancing on Capitol Hill, the BeautyBoiz will offer the perfect remedy. Frolic with fabulous burlesque artists and queens Waxie Moon, Betty Wetter, Kimber Shade, Tink Le Belle, Faggedy Randy, and others, who'll strut their devastating looks and show off killer moves. Plus, goggle at aerialist Eric Sanford, boogie with Thadayus & the Electrofunks, and stay on after the show to vogue to the best cuts by DJ Cookie Couture. It'll all go down at Fred Wildlife Refuge—start planning your ensemble now.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

When We Were Young and Unafraid
Sarah Treem's When We were Young and Unafraid is based on the historical "safe houses" on Whidbey Island, which served as refuge for women fleeing from abuse in the early 1970s, before Roe v. Wade or the Violence against Women Act. When Agnes, an owner of a safe house, takes in a runaway named Mary Anne and begins to worry about her influence on her college-bound daughter Penny, she's forced to deal with her own internalized misogyny.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

FESTIVALS

Taste of Tacoma
Fill up at BECU's food and drink festival, which features over 40 restaurants and vendors, a South Sound Bites local restaurant showcase, live music on stages, live cooking demonstrations, and cook-offs at the Taste Cooks! stage. The Rose Garden also hosts a wine and beer tasting, drinking gardens, and a carnival.

PERFORMANCE

House of Sueños
Meme Garcia's House of Sueños uses Hamlet to explore her relationships with her mentally ill sister and others in her life. To quote Rich Smith: "Playing herself, Hamlet, Ophelia, the sister she feels like she’s wronged, and the abusive ex-boyfriend who wronged her, Garcia sits onstage in a basement and sifts through 60 years of artifacts left behind by her recently departed grandparents."

READINGS & TALKS

Locus Awards 2018
Locus sci-fi fan magazine will celebrate its 50th birthday and distribute awards to some of the best in the field. There will also be readings by excellent future-feminist Connie Willis and epic sci-fi writer Yoon Ha Lee, panels, signings, and a party.

SATURDAY

ART

Arc Artist Fellowship Showcase
Meet the first 4Culture Arc Artist Fellows—dancer Angel Alviar-Langley (aka Moonyeka), visual artist Earl Debnam, writer Tara Hardy, and theater artist Michael Rowe. Spoiler: They're all very talented. In particular, Hardy won the Washington State Book Award for My, My, My, My, My, and Debnam co-founded the Northwest African American Museum. Learn more about the new program and have some snacks.

COMEDY

ASSBUTTS (Amazing Super Spectacular Bold Unscripted Terrific Theater Show)
Some of the city's finest performers will collaborate on instantaneous comedy scenes, with a different lineup every Saturday, in Mandy Price's ASSBUTTS. Don't be surprised if it gets a little vulgar. Or extremely vulgar.

FESTIVALS

PrideFest Capitol Hill
Capitol Hill's rainbow crosswalks serve as emblems of the neighborhood's queer history, but longtime locals will attest that the streets are wholly different from the way they were in their prime. For the fifth year, multitudes of LGBTQ+ Seattleites and allies will reclaim the Hill for PrideFest, which this year will be expanded to include Broadway from John to Roy, as well as Denny Way and Cal Anderson Park. There, families can join Aleksa Manila for Drag Queen Story Time, dance to live music, and watch a Doggy Drag Contest. At the south stage, hosted by Rainbow Gore Cake, live DJs will spin throughout the day. The north stage will be reserved for "All Stars" karaoke.

FILM

Aperture
See new shorts by students of the Blanket Fort Films Motion Picture Program, which aims to boost people underrepresented in film. The movies include "Bad Theology," filmed at Black & Tan Hall and starring the amazing dancer Randy Ford and poet J Mase III as well as "Same Same But Different," co-created by Stranger designer L Fried. Hang out with the filmmakers afterward at the Cloud Room Bar.

FOOD & DRINK

Nacho Borracho Pride Party!
The colorful Capitol Hill dive’s planned festivities during Seattle PrideFest sound like the makings of a perfect day: Broadway will be closed down and there will be a beer garden, those boozy slushie machines will be churning up frosty treats like frozen avocado margaritas and frosé, there will be Jell-O shots all day long, and there will be nourishment from Neon Taco. Witchy-glam drag coven the Markos Sisters will perform, and DJ Timmy Taco, DJ Rainbow Tay, and DJ Larry Rose will spin. Slurp a pink guava Moscow mule slushy through a straw in the sun, maybe with a side of queso-drenched nachos, as you take in the revelry of the day—what more could you possibly want?

Shake Shack x Canlis Pop-Up
No disrespect to the venerable institution that is Dick’s, but Seattleites have been yearning for the Angus beef burgers, golden crinkle-cut fries, and luscious, creamy shakes and blended frozen-custard concretes of Shake Shack for years. Now that dream is finally nigh, as the first Seattle location of the fast-casual chain approaches its opening sometime later this year in South Lake Union. Before then, it will be popping up with a family-friendly outdoor festival preview in the back lot of Canlis, of all places. (As it turns out, Shake Shack CEO Randy Garutti is a longtime friend of the Canlis family and was previously the general manager of Canlis.) They'll have those classic burgers and fries, yes, but also unique items like Canlis-inspired Dungeness crab melts and crème brûlée whoopie pies, with the chain’s own ShackMeister beer, Charles & Charles rosé, and Jones Soda root beer to wash it all down. Local bands SISTERS, Spirit Award, and the Moondoggies will perform, and guests will be able to play lawn games like cornhole and Connect Four. Attendance is first come, first served, so RSVP and get there early for your only chance to get a taste of the Shack in Seattle before the new location lands. JULIANNE BELL

Sweet Tooth Pop-Up
Sate your bottomless need for sweets at this South Lake Union pop-up, which will showcase sucrose-laden treats, including cookies, ice cream, macarons, toffee, crepes, pastries, and more, from more than 20 artisan vendors. The confection selection will include the pastel-hued meringue creations of Alexandra’s Macarons; cookies crammed with flavors like salted toffee pecan, brown butter triple chocolate chunk, and s’mores from Lowrider Baking Company; incandescently good ice cream from former Poppy pastry chef Matt Bumpas’s pop-up, Sweet Bumpas; and super-smooth scoops from local microcreamery Bluebird Ice Cream (sleep on their vegan horchata at your own peril)—just to name a few. JULIANNE BELL

PERFORMANCE

90th Anniversary Celebration: The People's Theatre
The historic “People’s Theatre” will hold a free anniversary celebration featuring tons of great local performers. The main attraction, a free Death Cab for Cutie concert hosted by Hari Kondabolu, is sold out, but, before that, polymath Nancy Guppy will host a free street celebration outside. There will be performances from SassyBlack, the Lieu Quan Lion Dance Team, Apna Bhangra Crew, NW Tap Connection (with music by Shakiah Danielson and Levi Ware), Ten Man Brass Band, Seattle Kokon Taiko, and Seattle Women’s Steel Pan Project, plus a cash bar and viewings of the Re:definition gallery inside.

ArtHaus: All-Stars 2
The weirdo drag battles at ArtHaus produce the kind of shockingly brilliant, deeply strange, and delightfully incomprehensible performances that I imagine when old timers talk about the off-the-wall art people used to make before the first wave of tech money started "ruining" everything. Go and have fun at something for once in your life. RICH SMITH

Big Pride
If your approach to Pride is to chill out for one day in one spot that offers drinks and drag, Linda's Tavern may have what you desire. Start with a sloshy brunch at 10 am with Bounce Brunch DJs and drink specials. Then, return for a free drag show with Shar Cooterie, Lisa with a D, Londyn Bradshaw, the Markos sisters, Louvel, Karmen Korbel, and Kitty Glitter in the back lot. Finish the night with Absolut cocktails.

READINGS & TALKS

Lindy West, Kate Durbin, Stacey Tran
You all know by now that New York Times columnist (and former Stranger staff writer) Lindy West is the funniest and most incisive feminist with 1,200 words due twice a month, but you might not know the other two insanely good writers supporting her on this bill. Writer and performance artist Kate Durbin, who's often the most neon-colored entity in the room, literally wears her obsession with American and international pop culture on her sleeves. (I once saw a photo of her in a Disney princess dress composed of drawings of Disney princesses in dresses.) Stacey Tran's debut book of poems, Soap for the Dogs, is a spare and gorgeous look at family history and food. Her "Fake Haiku" series is great, and the last few lines of the title poem punch me in the gut every time she reads it. This reading kicks off Gramma Poetry's quarterly series, which pairs national writers with local talent. You'll want to keep up with this one. RICH SMITH

SUNDAY

ART

Dawn Cerny: Now That We Found Love What Are We Gonna Do with It?
The heart of this show, by longtime Seattle artist and 2015 Stranger Genius Award nominee Dawn Cerny, is her watercolor series, A lap is a kind of chair. The only chair you can afford is a broken one. In these watercolors, one person “sits” chairless, while another kneels in front of them. In most of the works, the kneeling person’s head is buried in the other person’s lap, lending a sexual charge to the work. But with titles like Ikea Again and Livingroom, any hint of eroticism is removed. Instead, what is revealed in this unusual coming together of bodies is an intimate and tender moment of compassion. KATIE KURTZ
Closing Sunday

FOOD & DRINK

Lamb Jam Seattle 2018
At this competition brought to you by Tasty Creative and the American Lamb Board, 16 rising-star chefs will duke it out to concoct the ultimate lamb dish and be crowned the Lamb Jam Seattle Champion. Lamb belly ramen? Lamb ham Cubanos? Anything goes. The categories include Asian, Latin, Mediterranean, and Middle Eastern, and restaurants represented in the competition will include laudable local establishments like Lark, Mamnoon, Omega Ouzeri, Lola, Heartwood Provisions, and Le Petit Cochon, to name a few. Meanwhile, bartenders, brewers, winemakers, and other culinary artisans will round out the experience, and you can expect surprises like butcher pop-ups and local musicians. The Seattle “best in show” winner will advance to the next round to contend with the finalists from Austin, Boston, San Francisco, and Washington, DC, in a finale to be proclaimed “Lamb Jam Master." JULIANNE BELL

Whiskey & BBQ Workshop
If you're partial to smoky meats and smooth whiskey, head to this workshop with a custom whiskey blending session from OOLA Distillery with owner and head distiller Kirby Kallas-Lewis, who will explain how barrels are pulled to create balanced whiskey blends, and a demonstration from Hot S'Awesome chef and owner Cam Orgaard on the techniques he uses to barbecue brisket and pork shoulder. Guests will get to create their own custom blend from a selection of different whiskeys.

WOW (addo:Incubator)
Zagat 30 under 30 contender Chef Matt and Seattle native Chef Kelsi will collaborate on an a la carte "dim sum style" Mexican pop-up where all the courses range between three and 10 bucks.

PRIDE

Our Rainbow Connection
Before the Seattle Pride Parade kicks off, the Sister of Perpetual Indulgence, the Abbey of St. Joan will hold a moment of silence for those who have lost their lives to gun violence. Immediately afterwards, they'll be joined by the Seattle Men’s and Women's Chorus and the Rainbow City Marching Band for a mass singing of Ken Ascher and Paul William's "Rainbow Connection."

Pride Weekend: Mimosas with Mama
Before you merge into the moving rainbow that is the Seattle Pride Parade, fuel up with Pride cocktails and a full brunch buffet during a cabaret-style drag brunch with Mama Tits and DJ Pryme Tyme.

Seattle Pride Parade
Pride month culminates in several major events at the end of June, and the parade down Fourth Avenue, which leads to PrideFest at Seattle Center, is chief among them. Scattered among throngs of rainbow flag-bearers, expect to see scantily clad Batmen, drag queens, people in assless chaps, leather daddies, families in matching hats, and countless other glittering entities on the sidelines and in the moving mass during the two-and-half-hour procession. In solidarity with refugees facing discrimination, racially charged violence, and lack of access to the US, this year’s theme is “Pride Beyond Borders.”

PrideFest Seattle Center
When the Seattle Pride Parade route ends and you're craving more queer merriment among the masses, you’ll conveniently find yourself at the sight of four stages that promise all-ages arts and culture entertainment (including performances from Carmen Carrera and RainbowGore Cake, live music from the Seattle Ladies Choir and Whitney Monge, and tons more) from noon to night. A highlight is Pop + Pride, where MoPOP will offer free admission to its Sky Church for a DJ dance party and queer music video projections all day long.

READINGS & TALKS

Seven Things I've Learned: An Afternoon with Ira Glass
The creator of This American Life, Ira Glass, not only hosts his own blockbuster radio show and podcast, he’s also produced film and television, danced with a famed ballerina company, DJed with our own DJ Dan Savage, and influenced an entire generation of current storytellers and radio producers. If there’s a podcast you love, chances are, Ira Glass has had some kind of influence on it, and he’ll be talking about both his life and his work when he brings his latest act to Tacoma. KATIE HERZOG