Don't miss the opening of MUSE: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête at the Henry. Hank Willis Thomas. Look Natural. 1980, 2010. Courtesy of Hank Willis Thomas and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York
Our music critics have already chosen the 33 best music shows this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn to pick the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks in every genre—from author Ottessa Moshfegh's book tour stop to Sara Porkalob's Persimmon Nights, and from DragonFest to the Ballard SeafoodFest. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.
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MONDAY

ART

'I'm Shy' Zine Release
I'm Shy zine is described as a "collaboration of friends and shy ppl lol," a category including Anton Gaytan, Eiffel Sour, Gabrielle Myer, Kat Varela, Cristina Vasquez De Mercado, Bridget Sweet, Alana Cuturilo-Hackney, The Stranger's Kim Selling, Meg Schmitt, and Keely Nelson Rivers. Celebrate with a dance party.

Splitting Image
Marita Dingus, Troy Gua, Tariqa Waters, and Jennifer Zwick—diverse and well-established artists and sculptors around Seattle—show unconventional takes on the portrait.
Closing Monday

FOOD & DRINK

Seattle Cares, Do YOU?
In response to a certain graffiti'd Zara jacket heard round the world, the Navy Strength crew has recruited a dream team of bartenders, chefs, and friends from all over Seattle to sling food and drinks to benefit RAICES, an organization that reunites immigrant children with their parents at the border. Similarly concerned citizens can enjoy music from a DJ and food and drinks from such beloved Seattle establishments as Babirusa, Ma'ono, Carlile Room, Vita Uva, Hood Famous Bakeshop, and more. A suggested donation of $15 gets you in, and all tips and a majority of drink sales will go to the cause.

READINGS & TALKS

Mona Hanna-Attisha: What the Eyes Don't See
Pediatrician Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha sounded the alarm on Flint's lead-polluted drinking water, and she's here to be present her story in What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City. Find inspiration in her experience defending children's health.

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY

ART

Jini Dellaccio: Caught in the Act
Starting as a self-taught fashion photographer in California, Jini Dellaccio (1917–2014) was one of those right-place, right-time photographers. A teaching job brought her to the Northwest in the 1960s, where she was asked to capture the essence and energy of proto-grunge bands like the Sonics and the Wailers, as well as the wide-eyed winsomeness of Seattle native Merrilee Rush (“Angel of the Morning”). The first female rock-and-roll photographer, Dellaccio (who said in an interview that she didn’t know she was the first) also shot Neil Young, Mick Jagger, and the Who. KATIE KURTZ
Closing Wednesday

MONDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Heather Marie Scholl: Reflections
Troubled by the role of women in white supremacy? So is Heather Marie Scholl, whose Whitework is a body of embroidery and text that interrogates white womanhood. The other part of this exhibition, The Self Portraits, features framed, embroidered pictures that evoke women's trauma and the experiences of femininity.
Opening Monday

TUESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Portugal One World Dinner
At this dinner in a series that aims to "foster an appreciation of our global neighbors through the sharing of delicious food and drink," dine on traditional Portuguese dishes like alheira sausage, grilled octopus, and bacalhau à brás (a classic comfort food with salt cod, black olives, potatoes, onion, and egg).

READINGS & TALKS

Clarion West Presents: Karen Lord
Multiple award winner Lord, who was born in Barbados and studied in Toronto, draws on Senegalese myth and her own work as a sociologist of religion for her sci-fi.

Jonathan White: Tides
Tides is the latest work by writer/sailer/surfer Jonathan White, combining memoir, science, and anthropology for a cultural and scientific investigation into the significance of (you guessed it) tides. White travelled around the world conducting interviews and assessing the impact of these mysterious moon-driven forces.

TUESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Bridget Sexauer: Pareidolia
New-to-town artist Bridget Sexauer will have a solo show of pareidolia (the perception of patterns or features where there are none, e.g., Jesus in toast). She's a painstaking painter with a knack for capturing the feeling of frozen personalities we attribute to lifeless things.
Closing Saturday

Megumi Shauna Arai: Midst
Arai's photographs capture rich and beautiful shades—in sandy landscapes, in steam and smoke, and even in models' clothing.
Closing Saturday

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

The Aliens
In the New York Times, critic Charles Isherwood called this Annie Baker joint about a group of young men hanging out at a Vermont coffee shop “a gentle and extraordinarily beautiful play” that was also “inordinately delicate.” Translation: You’ll either fall asleep while watching it or spend three or four hours after the show trying to convince your friends that they were idiots for falling asleep while watching it. Whatever your views on Baker’s extremely good but extremely subtle storytelling, it’ll be interesting to see if David Hsieh can draw out the nuanced acting he needs from the three young actors tasked to deliver Baker’s mumblecore lines—Alan E. Garcia, Curtis Gehlhausen, and Cooper Harris-Turner. If he can, ReAct Theatre's staging could shape up to be an under-the-radar summer hit. RICH SMITH

WEDNESDAY

COMEDY

Minority Retort Live
This showcase that highlights comedians of color is coming to Seattle. Join Jason Lamb, Julia Ramos, and Neeraj Srinivasan as they welcome hilarious local favorites Kermit Apio, Birungi, Vanessa Dawn, Manny Martin, and Narin Vann.

FOOD & DRINK

Free Slurpee Day
Every year on July 11, 7-Eleven gives away a free small Slurpee. Go to the nearest location and claim what is yours.

READINGS & TALKS

Charles Johnson: Night Hawks
In a recent interview with the New York Times, Charles Johnson said the title story in his new collection of short fiction, Night Hawks, emerged from "15 years of spirited eight-to-10-hour dinner conversations here in Seattle" with his friend August Wilson, the greatest playwright to ever scribble away an afternoon in a cafe on 15th Avenue. If that is not enough of a reason for you to pick up the book or listen to the MacArthur Genius/National Book Award–winning author read from it, then you don't deserve to read anything ever again. RICH SMITH

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Adrianne Smits: Serpentine
Adrianne Smits has a PhD in ecology and a BS in biology and painting, and her love of the earth emerges in her animistic natural landscapes, which compress perspective and elide details to create a Middle Earth-like aesthetic. Her work is directly inspired by her own scientific field research in the wilds of Alaska and southeast Asia.
Closing Saturday

Michael Kenna: Abruzzo and New Photographs
Michael Kenna of England shows new photographs. His work often makes use of long exposures to tease out unusual facets of natural and manmade landscapes all around the world.
Closing Saturday

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Lechoncito
Pork enthusiasts can enter a state of bliss at this weekly five-course, Puerto Rican family-style dinner. The menu changes every time.

PERFORMANCE

Femme Fatale
A Prom Queen and Can Can collab!? Yes, please! The Can Can culinary cabaret, which serves up some of the best butts and beignets in town, is partnering with rising music star Prom Queen for their summer show, and it's a safe bet that it will be a hit. That said, the team could have chosen a better subject than Mata Hari, who catapulted to fame using an outsider's vision of Indonesia. Hopefully their adaptation will avoid Hari's pitfalls by doing more than just simply reproducing the Dutch dancer's problematic early-20th-century Orientalist style. Otherwise, this will be a spectacular shitshow. CHASE BURNS

THURSDAY

ART

Capitol Hill Art Walk
Every second Thursday, rain or shine, the streets of Capitol Hill are filled with tipsy art lovers checking out galleries and special events. In July, check out the Capitol Hill Block Party 2018 Poster Show, Genevieve St. Charles: One Night Snack, the Aquamarine group show, and Chris Crites: Australians.

COMEDY

A Tribe Called Yes
This improvised hiphop play will depict a supergroup's rise to prominence amid "feuds, fame, and family." Catch them before they appear at Bumbershoot.

FILM

Carole Lombard: Queen of Comedy
The cool, brainy star of 1930s cinema starred in great movies like To Be or Not To Be, My Man Godfrey, and Hitchcock’s Mr. and Mrs. Smith. Watch the films that made her famous at this weekly SAM series, which will kick off this week with 20th Century.

Shriek! Friday the 13th
Watch the 1980 slasher flick with a more intellectual eye than usual at this Shriek! dissection hosted by Heather Marie Bartels, Megan Peck, and Evan J. Peterson. The class will focus on female heroes versus female villains, and the lack of female villains and monsters in horror franchises.

FOOD & DRINK

Outstanding in the Field Dinner: Hama Hama Oyster Farm
Named after that old dad chestnut about the farmer who got promoted, the Outstanding in the Field dinner series, founded in 1999 by artist and chef Jim Denevan, takes the “farm-to-table” concept one step further and instead brings the table to the farm. Diners take a seat at a communal table and break bread in an extraordinary outdoor location, the very place where their food was sourced from. This year, the tour will stop at Hama Hama Oyster Farm, where chef Jason Stoneburner of Stoneburner and Bastille will prepare a meal. Stoneburner is committed to sourcing ingredients as directly as possible—he has owned farmland in Redmond and harvests ingredients from his own garden and beehive on top of Stoneburner—so he’s a natural choice for this hyper-local supper. JULIANNE BELL

PERFORMANCE

Mama Tits is 'Big & Loud'
Get a load of the pipes on that broad! Everyone's favorite giant of drag is back in town and ready to belt out one showstopper after another. Mama's show Big & Loud is part storytelling, part musical revue, and part comedic act—with a voice so sultry, it'll make your socks go up and down. Mama is one of a rare breed of drag performers whose song, dance, and personality can command any space she enters, whether it's a coffee shop or an auditorium or a city street. And with dinner and drinks served to your table, the Triple Door is a perfect home for this triple threat. MATT BAUME

READINGS & TALKS

Forms of the Book, Metamorphosis, and Beyond
Here's an interesting assortment of literary achievement: Amaranth Borsuk will unveil excerpts from her history/future chronicle of publishing from MIT Press (The Book), the "dazzling, disorienting" (per Sarah Galvin) Doug Nufer will read from his "manipulations of Kafka" (Metamorphosis), and Shin Yu Pai of Atlas Obscura will talk about her work "beyond books."

Nights at the Neptune: Dare to Claim the Sky
Enter the "proverbial living room" of Seattle-based storyteller Sharon Nyree Williams as she shares original pieces that deal with "family, faith, and the pain of being black in this society."

Noir at the Bar
Spend a moody evening curled up with a cocktail and a gritty/spooky/earthy/hard-boiled story read out loud. The readers will include Scotti Andrews, Alice Boatwright, Curt Colbert and Waverly Fitzgerald, Alec Cizak, Ashley Erwin, Nick Feldman, and Bethany Maines. Will Viharo will host.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Land Ho: New Work by Ken Kelly
Ken Kelly was born in Arkansas but has been working in Seattle since the 1980s, where he's won the Betty Bowen Award and been nominated for a Neddy. He's known for bold, right-angle abstractions.
Closing Saturday

The Male Gaze
In 1975, feminist film critic Laura Mulvey proposed her theory of the “male gaze.” It articulated what is now commonly understood: The male heterosexual perspective frames women solely as sexual objects for their pleasure, which is problematic because of the inherent imbalance of power between the sexes. Since there are no female bodies in this group show of photographic work, perhaps a more useful framework is Patrick Schuckmann’s alternative theoretical model of the “homoerotic gaze.” The theory explores the “contradictory relationship that is established between the erotically charged, idealized male images and the male spectator.” Taken individually, pieces in the show—like Robert Calafiore’s Untitled of a nude male in languid repose, or Antonio Jacob Martinez’s painterly photos of MMA fighters locked in battle—don’t automatically read as homoerotic. Grouped together, the show’s homoeroticism is undeniable, which makes for an entirely different dynamic between model and viewer. KATIE KURTZ
Closing Saturday

Painters Who Fucking Know How To Paint
Is painting dead? Nope! Find evidence that the art form has not disappeared into the ether.
Closing Saturday

COMEDY

Guys We F#@ed Comedy Tour: Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson
Krystyna Hutchinson and Corinne Fisher are the NYC comedy duo known collectively as Sorry About Last Night, and they’re the minds (and voices) behind Guys We Fucked: The Anti Slut-Shaming Podcast, where they discuss sex and all the things that surround it (kinks, reproductive rights, assault, relationships, neuroses, etc.) via a mix of commentary, anecdotes, and interviews with other comics, writers, progressive thinkers, and captivating intellectuals (including our own Dan Savage). Shows on their Guys We F#@ed Tour feature audience interactive advice sessions/open forums with both ladies, as well as solo sets of frank and uncensored stand-up by each. LEILANI POLK

PERFORMANCE

Cell Phone Waiting Lot
When normal people pick up their loved ones from the airport, they arrive on time and drive around and around in a loop until their beloved finally emerges from the airport burdened with luggage. But brown-nosing rule-followers know there’s a place called a “cell phone waiting lot,” which is really just a giant wi-fi-enabled parking lot where you can hang out (for only 20 minutes!) without being harassed by the “move along” cops. A quartet of local playwrights (Andrew Lee Creech, Jackie De La Cruz, Nick Edwards, and Maggie Lee) use this slightly bizarre setting as the backdrop for four 20-minute plays about the unexpected dramas and farces that befall these parking-lot people. RICH SMITH

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Summer at SAM
These Thursday and Saturday events offer a range of family-friendly arts programming throughout the park, including yoga and Zumba on Saturdays, tours, shows, workshops, food trucks, and more.

PERFORMANCE

King Lear
George Mount will direct this outdoor Seattle Shakespeare performance of the bleak and stormy play about an aging king and his foolish decision to expel his only honest daughter and bequeath his lands on her power-hungry older sisters.

Persimmon Nights
Last year, Sara Porkalob fully realized Cafe Nordo’s potential for gustatory and dramatic pleasure with Madame Dragon’s 60th Birthday Bash, a musical adaptation of her Dragon Lady series. The show was equal parts hilarious and poignant, and she meaningfully incorporated the food menu into the performance. Now she’s back at Nordo directing and starring in a brand-new show by Seattle playwright Saeyoung Yim (Do It for Umma). Backed by a pop group called the Kimchi Kittens, Porkalob and Ray Tagavilla (one of the best actors in town) will tell the story of a “brash, young Korean immigrant” who balances “two lovers and many debts in the 1960s.” RICH SMITH

FRIDAY

FILM

Midnight Movie Madness
Have a blast watching public domain horror films, boozing it up at the pay-what-you-want bar, or playing board or video games with the horror sketch troupe Drop the Root Beer and Run. A must for fans of comedy, low-fi horror, and cheesiness.

'Sorry to Bother You' Opening
Boots Riley’s tale of a not-too-distant dystopian future steeped in racially aware class struggle takes on a deserving protagonist: black telemarketer Cassius Green (played by Lakeith Stanfield, of Atlanta and Get Out), who discovers that his “white voice” just might help him achieve his dreams. But like anything involving white people, there’s probably a catch. David Cross supplies Green’s “white voice” in the film, while Cassius’s coworker Langston (Danny Glover), who clues Cassius into the secret of the “white voice,” gets a taste of that sweet, sweet white privilege from the vocal cords of Steve Buscemi. SOPHIA STEPHENS

Through Her Eyes: Indigenous Shorts
Longhouse Media and Stranger Genius in Film awardee Tracy Rector will present films from Native women's perspectives at this event in conjunction with the Double Exposure: Edward S. Curtis, Marianne Nicolson, Tracy Rector, Will Wilson exhibit.

PERFORMANCE

DANCE This!
After an intense collaboration with community and international artists, teens will perform three new dance works in the 20th iteration of this annual series.

Queer'd Science: Androids, Fembots, and Nonbinary Cyborgs
Miss Texas 1988, a rising (lone) star in the drag scene, presents this sparky suite of lip syncs "inspired by the fictional MegaMen, Bionic Women, and genderless gadgets we know and love." According to press materials, she'll cohost with "a malfunctioning MamaBot," and introduce special guest Arson Nicki, among other glitchy queens. I saw a video of a recent performance, where Miss Texas 1988 was eating fistfuls of butter substitute in a sequined dress. Expect that kind of thing to happen here. If this show doesn't single-handedly goad the entire tech community to fund and participate in the theatrical arts, then they don't deserve it. RICH SMITH

READINGS & TALKS

Ottessa Moshfegh: My Year of Rest and Relaxation
At one point in your life, you have likely said, "I just want to live under a rock and hibernate for a year." You probably haven't followed through on that wish, but that's the difference between you and Ottessa Moshfegh's wealthy, young, New York City protagonist. In My Year of Rest and Relaxation, her main character holes up in her apartment, takes tons of prescription drugs, and sleeps as often as she can. When a famous artist catches wind of her decision to clock out for a year, shit really starts getting weird. In this novel, and in general, Moshfegh is darkly funny and unsparing in her critiques of human behavior, and ultimately just a really fun and nervy writer to read. Her last book, Eileen, was short-listed for the 2016 Man Booker Prize, and this one might get similar treatment. RICH SMITH

Susan Carr: The Rat Tree
Seattle’s pre-eminent voice instructor follows up her novel The Ballad of Desiree with this illustrated story set in 1950s Portland, in which “a big family of grandparents, parents, aunts, uncles and cousins gather for their annual summer pool party. As the sun shines on the family, two young cousins explore the attic of the mill where grandfather stores his tools, trunks and secrets. In a locked trunk they find clues to his hidden Nazi past and generations of abuse.” SEAN NELSON

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

FOOD & DRINK

SILVA - The Story of Washington
At this pop-up named after the Latin word meaning "forest," chef Eric Rivera will tell the story of Washington with an evolving 12-15 course tasting menu that will teach guests about the "people, ingredients, and preparations from across Washington."

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Ballard SeafoodFest
Originally started as a celebration of the neighborhood’s fishing industry in 1974, this festival has expanded over the years to include an alder-smoked salmon dinner, a crab shack, a beer garden replete with Ballard craft brews, a lengthy list of food and artisan craft vendors, and music. This year's music lineup includes experimental country/folk rockers Blitzen Trapper, Nashville rock band All Them Witches, Canadian folk/bluegrass group the Dead South, and many more. Gluttons for punishment can enroll in the lutefisk eating contest, an annual competition to see who can scarf the most of the salty, gelatinous fish. JULIANNE BELL

Kirkland Uncorked
This summer wine festival, which benefits no-kill shelter Homeward Bound Pet Adoption Center, encompasses a 21+ wine tasting garden, a "burger brawl," and music, as well as a street fair with a boat show, a food truck feast, and other activities.

PERFORMANCE

Gilbert & Sullivan's Patience
Ruben van Kempen and Maestro Bernard Kwiram direct Victorian theatrical duo W. S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan's satirical comedy filled with "rapturous maidens, handsome and moody poets, a platoon of enthusiastic British Dragoon Guards, and the local milkmaid who throws a wrench in it all."

Henry IV, part 1
Henry IV, part 1 may be best-known for Falstaff, whom former Stranger theater critic Brendan Kiley called one of the "saddest, funniest, wittiest characters in the English language." GreenStage Shakespeare in the Park will present a version of the history play about the War of the Roses and the coming-of-age of Prince Hal. Directed by Amelia Meckler Bowers.

SATURDAY

ART

Georgetown Art Attack
Once a month, the art that resides in the tiny airport hamlet of Georgetown ATTACKS all passersby. In more literal terms, it's the day of art openings and street wonderment. In July, don't miss the Hot Off the Press Book Fair, Klara Glosova: Delirious Dreaming Pugilist and Other Stories, and Land Ho: New Work by Ken Kelly.

Jazz Brown: Zen and Now Opening Reception
Jazz Brown's vibrant, bebop-inspired abstract paintings are what he calls "consciousness on canvas." They're so bright and lively, you can practically see them dance. Stranger art critic Emily Pothast has said that his "minimal vocabulary of straight lines gives rise to compositions that embody both dynamism and balance; thesis and antithesis."

COMEDY

The Bodega Boys Live Featuring Desus Nice & The Kid Mero
Hilarious Bronx-born web comedians Desus and Mero, aka the Bodega Boys, will regale you with their snarky and slightly mean takes on pop culture and politics.

FILM

Home Movies: Filmmakers Document Their Families
What happens when filmmakers turn their cameras on their own families? This series, curated by Brian Belovarac, focuses on a trend that began in the 1970s with the invention of portable 8mm filmmaking equipment. See films by everyone from Andy Warhol to China's Liu Jiayin by way of Belgian experimentalist Chantal Akerman and the American Nelson Mandela Award winner Thomas Allen Harris.

PERFORMANCE

The Other Season: Antony and Cleopatra
Award-winning Christopher Chen has translated Shakespeare's doomed romance into modern verse, with excellent local director Desdemona Chiang helping out as dramaturg. Hear parts of the script and chat with the creative team.

Seattle International Butoh Festival
If you’ve ever wanted to see a ghost come to life, attend the Seattle International Butoh Festival—and you’ll see them dance. This contemporary form of Japanese performance is inspired by the grotesque, but its intense beauty comes through in each dancer’s meticulous, slow, hyper-exaggerated movements. The festival brings the avant-garde dance/art form to the Northwest with events in Seattle, Shoreline, and Snohomish, and it is organized by and features performances from Joan Laage’s Seattle-based DAIPANbutoh Collective. The festival also offers an array of international guest artists and masters of the form, including Japan’s Mushimaru Fujieda. SOPHIA STEPHENS

Strictly Outside
In one of Seattle's most interesting outdoor spaces, Jody Kuehner (the alter ego of "female impersonator impersonator" Cherdonna Sinatra) will lead Strictly Seattle participants in a dance performance called Brute Beauty, a response to the #metoo movement. Come early for a tour of the Brutalist yet lovely space, and stay for the dance at noon.

READINGS & TALKS

Thor Hanson: Buzz
Washington native and conservation biologist Thor Hanson is one of those science writers who can poke and stoke your curiosity no matter what he's writing about. A few years ago, he championed one of the tiniest but mightiest forces of nature in The Triumph of Seeds. In Buzz, he's moved up one rung on the taxonomical ladder with a comprehensive book on bees, an insect that started out in the world as a wasp that "dared to feed pollen to its young." They've been pollinating the earth's flora for 125 million years, but, like everything else on this planet, they might not be buzzing around for much longer. Find out everything you can about these honey bugs before we find some way to shrivel them up for good. RICH SMITH

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

ART

MUSE: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête
Earlier this year, Mickalene Thomas's bright, brilliant portraits of black women in dazzling interior spaces graced the walls of Seattle Art Museum as part of Figuring History, a multigenerational group show that placed her in a lineage of monumental painters that also includes Robert Colescott and Kerry James Marshall. While most of Thomas's works begin with photographic sources, MUSE is the first exhibition devoted to considering her photographs as finished works in themselves. As the title suggests, this show revolves around the inspiring women who compose Thomas's community. Curated by Thomas, tête-à-tête is an accompanying exhibition of photographs by artists who further inspire her. EMILY POTHAST
Opening Saturday

FESTIVALS

DragonFest
When you live in Chinatown, you start to take the dragon and lion dances—a traditional form of Chinese dance that is said to bring good luck and fortune—for granted. But the performances are longer and more elaborate during Dragon Fest, taking on extra festive overtones as the team of performers maneuvers and manipulates the long, undulating bodies down the streets of the I.D. using poles positioned along their length, coordinating with the throbbing beat and crashing cymbals issued by the accompanying percussion players. It is quite the sight. Dragon Fest also boasts 14 hours of cultural performances outside of these dances—traditional Korean drumming, bhangra/Bollywood presentations, martial arts demos, and Pacific Islander dances, among others. Plus, there’s the $3 Food Walk (encompassing more than 40 restaurants), and a range of temporary vendors hawking food, goods, and bevvies galore. LEILANI POLK

PERFORMANCE

Seattle Outdoor Theater Festival
Theater is alive in Seattle, but, as in most places, it generally isn't cheap. GreenStage, Theater Schmeater, and Wooden O Productions set out to change that in 2001 with the first Outdoor Theater Festival. Watch Shakespeare plays and more contemporary pieces from the festival's founders and seven other theater companies over what will hopefully be a sunny weekend.

SUNDAY

ART

Thick as Thieves Issue 5 Release Party
Local comics and arts anthology Thick as Thieves Quarterly will celebrate the release of its "biggest, boldest issue yet." Stop by to meet and buy wares from artists like Max Clotfelter, Travis Rommereim, Lara Kaminoff, Handa, Seth Goodkind, Marc Palm, and others. There will also be a "wild raffle" with artsy prizes, live DJs, an n64 setup, and drinks.

COMEDY

Bill Burr
As a comedian with a big mouth, brash attitude, and selective filter, Bill Burr regularly offends people, which is pretty easy to do with the current profusion of snowflakes floating around the country. Also, no subject matter is off limits; during a recent Conan appearance, he touched on the military, obesity, and sexual harassment, all in one fell swoop, while on his next visit, he discussed his desire to yell at other peoples’ kids and how fatherhood is kind of like being the back-up quarterback—everyone else comes first. I don’t know what he’ll be discussing on his current tour, but belly laughs are guaranteed. LEILANI POLK

FOOD & DRINK

Lamb & Rosé Dinner
In her book A Boat, a Whale & a Walrus: Menus and Stories, chef Renee Erickson writes that she’s always harbored a fondness for rosé, ever since it first started gaining popularity in the United States, and has long appreciated its ability to stand up to foods that “other wines can’t.” One such food is lamb. Because a leg of lamb was too time-consuming to offer as a regular menu dish, Erickson and her colleagues at Boat Street Cafe conceived a joyful, family-style dinner party of lamb and rosé for a special feast. And the tradition stuck. The dinner takes place every July, usually on a night that Erickson describes as “the kind of warm summer evening that brings a whisper of salt air in from Puget Sound.” Over the years, the event has evolved—this year’s festivities will feature applewood-roasted Katahdin lamb cooked in the Whale Wins’ wood-fired oven—but some things remain constant: Guests can always count on a never-ending flow of pale pink wine and lots of dancing. JULIANNE BELL

WOW (addo:Incubator)
Zagat 30 under 30 contender Chef Matt and Seattle native Chef Kelsi will collaborate on an a la carte "dim sum style" Mexican pop-up where all the courses range between three and 10 bucks.

PERFORMANCE

SH*T GOLD: The Deep End
Like the regular dance open mic event, this "SH*T GOLD marathon" is full of risky, daring material. But this time, the pieces can last up to 20 minutes instead of five.