In Crazy Rich Asians, vicariously enjoy the vagaries of the super-rich in Singapore.

August is beginning, which means a last summer crop of big-budget movies and fascinating indies as well as a spread of reissues, restorations, and series. Here are some of the biggest releases and most promising flicks coming up this month, from Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman to Dennis Hopper's 'The Last Movie' to the queer coming-of-age drama The Miseducation of Cameron Post. Follow the links below to see opening dates and showtimes, tickets, and trailers, and, if you're looking for even more options, check out our complete movie times listings or our film events calendar.

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.

1968: Expressions of a Flame
This five-film retrospective of the tumultuous year of 1968, which saw left-wing and anti-establishment rebellion across the world, ranges through different perspectives on war, upheaval, conformity, malaise, and radicalism. It begins in August with Vietnam and Modes of Resistance, an evening of news reels introduced by the Stranger's Charles Mudede, and Ingmar Bergman's distressing, surrealistic war drama Shame.
Northwest Film Forum
Saturdays, Aug 18–Sept 15

Alpha
A Cro-Magnon boy, wounded in a hunt and believed to be dead on his own, befriends the wolf who tries to kill him. Play out your Stone Age adventure fantasies with Kodi Smit-McPhee, who may be best known thus far for playing the unlucky boy in The Road alongside Viggo Mortensen.
Wide release
opening Fri Aug 17

Araby
Brazilian filmmakers Affonso Uchoa and João Dumans's film, set in the outskirts of an industrial town, is about a young man who discovers a wounded factory worker's notebook and follows his elder's tracks on a journey to find himself. Village Voice called Araby "a beautiful bummer of a movie" about a worker's frustrating search for happiness in a marginal existence.
SIFF Film Center
opening Fri Aug 10

The Big Lebowski 20th Anniversary
If pressed to name my single favorite moment in my single favorite Coen brothers movie, The Big Lebowski, it would be a three-way tie between Jeff "the Dude" Lebowski's dumpster-bumping car crash, the sheriff's assault on the Dude with a coffee mug, and the Raymond Chandler–esque discovery of Jackie Treehorn's hard-on doodle. BRADLEY STEINBACHER
AMC Pacific Place & Varsity Theatre
Aug 5 & 8

BlacKkKlansman
Spike Lee has not made a good movie in more than a decade (Inside Man, which stars Denzel Washington, was released in 2006). His 2015 film Chi-Raq was a disaster (read Ijeoma Oluo’s review, “Fuck You, Spike Lee,” of the work). The Netflix reboot of his 1986 classic She’s Gotta Have It was an embarrassment that only succeeded in showing his age. If you thought Lee, who is 61, was washed up, you were not alone. Now there is BlacKkKlansman, which premiered at Cannes and stars Denzel Washington’s son, John David Washington, and is described by Variety critic Peter Debruge as “How Spike Got His Groove Back.” That is very high praise. And there are good reasons to be excited about his new film. One, it’s produced by Jordan Peele, the director and writer behind the defining Obama-era feature Get Out. And two, its story, which is set in the early-1970s and concerns a black cop who infiltrated the KKK, is, of course, timely. Where Chi-Raq attempted to capture the mood of the Black Lives Matter moment, BlacKkKlansman is for the Make America Great Again moment. MAGA is the white hood of our times. CHARLES MUDEDE
Wide release
opening Fri Aug 10

The Bookshop
Isabel Coixet's The Bookshop stars Emily Mortimer as a stubborn woman who opens a bookstore in a British coastal village circa 1960 and rubs the conservative townspeople the wrong way. It doesn't look particularly edgy, but if you're into the quiet-drama-with-excellent-cast type of deal, this may appeal.
SIFF Cinema Uptown
opening Fri Aug 31

Christopher Robin
An adult Christopher Robin finds that his past imaginary friends won't let him go. Depending on your tastes, you either will find the walking, talking plushies pursuing Christopher Robin adorable, or they’ll send you straight into uncanny valley.
Wide release
opening Thurs Aug 2

Crazy Rich Asians
I know the feeling of this work. I understand what it wants to achieve. You see, most people in the United States think Africa is just a jungle with some huts. But much of it is not that at all. The Africa I experienced was, in fact, charming. I had lots of rich friends. We spent our days going around the city on racing bikes. We watched cricket. We had maids. That sort of thing. Yes, there was real and very harsh poverty, but that is not the universal experience on the Dark Continent. Now, what is the movie Crazy Rich Asians really about? A side of Asia that most Americans are not often exposed to. This is the new Asia. It has super-wealthy people who live ridiculously luxurious lives and have ordinary problems like ordinary rich Americans. A similar impulse can be found in the Ghanaian web series An African City (a black Sex in the City). This is the impulse to break old perceptions of life in countries that were once European colonies. CHARLES MUDEDE
Wide release
opening Wed Aug 15

The Darkest Minds
Teenagers start developing powers, and terrified adults imprison them, sparking their resistance. Is it corporate pandering to the spirit of youthful rage, or is it a genuine crowd-pleaser? You decide. (But it's probably pandering.)
Wide release
opening Thurs Aug 2

Dark Money
In 2010, the US Supreme Court declared that pumping corporate cash into elections is a form of free speech. We have been witnessing the consequences of the high court's Citizens United ruling ever since. But because so many of those consequences benefit Republican politicians, there can be a tendency to view opposition to Citizens United as primarily a leftist preoccupation. What's brilliant about Dark Money, a powerful documentary directed by Montana native Kimberly Reed, is how it proves the falsity of this notion by telling the story of Republican state lawmakers who found themselves in the crosshairs of a very effective dark-money blitz. It all makes the problem crystal clear: Corporate power is corrupting American democracy using massive contributions and complex voter-manipulation schemes at levels we've never seen before—levels that, to this day, we barely comprehend. It's a dynamic that hurts community-accountable Republicans and Democrats alike while helping only cosseted plutocrats. ELI SANDERS
SIFF Film Center
opening Fri Aug 3

Demolition Man
For reasons that are obvious, it’s not easy for a black American to play the villain in a film that has mostly white American actors and is directed by a white man. Many white Americans already think black men are natural-born villains, and the mainstream popular culture and media have a long history of portraying them as such. And so, the work of many black actors has been to counter this unfair and racist image. They have demanded and will only play roles that show blacks in a positive light. However, in 1993, black actor Wesley Snipes, who was then at his Hollywood peak and a long way from his tax troubles, decided to do the impossible and play a black baddie in a big-budget film. (A white man, Sylvester Stallone, plays the good guy.) This was a strange and fascinating twist. And though the film is not great, its racial experiment is very entertaining. CHARLES MUDEDE
Grand Illusion
opening Fri Aug 3

Dennis Hopper's 'The Last Movie'
This very unlucky film by Dennis Hopper, who'd just scored a hit with Easy Rider, was undermined by on-set catastrophe, drug-fueled rampages, and critical contempt. Upon its release, The Last Movie plunged into obscurity, but now it's back in 4K restoration. The story: An actor in a Western shot in Peru stays on after his shoot and begins a quest for gold, and the divide between reality and fiction starts to blur.
Northwest Film Forum
Aug 17–23

Dog Days
Love and dogs bring people—in this case, people played by Nina Dobrev, Vanessa Hudgens, Finn Wolfhard, Eva Longoria, Adam Pally, etc.— together. Watch as lonely Los Angeles denizens discover friendship and happiness, or just watch the dogs.
Wide release
opening Wed Aug 8

Generation Wealth
Lauren Greenfield (who made the critically praised The Queen of Versailles) takes a jaundiced and infuriating look at the unbelievably wealthy in China, Russia, and America, exploring how the pursuit of wealth warps everything for those who want to appear rich while lacking the means to buy luxuries. Glenn Kenny of RogerEbert.com called the documentary "compulsively watchable," but Scott Tobias of NPR criticized it for its "scattershot" approach.
SIFF Cinema Uptown
opening Fri Aug 3

Half the Picture
Why, after more than a century of women filmmaker-pioneers, do we still see so few movies by women? This documentary seeks insight from directors by Ava DuVernay (A Wrinkle in Time), Miranda July (Me You and Everyone We Know), and Penelope Spheeris (Wayne's World), who all have blunt things to say about Hollywood's track record of failing to support and encourage female filmmaking talent.
Northwest Film Forum
Aug 17–19

The Happytime Murders
Brian Henson’s murder mystery takes place among cloth puppets that may resemble the cast of your favorite ‘80s kids’ show and features the voices of Jimmy O. Yang, Melissa McCarthy, and Elizabeth Banks. Content warning: puppet ejaculation.
Wide release
opening Fri Aug 24

Italo Disco Legacy
Italo disco has legs—garishly hued, glittery-leotard'd legs. And the musical genre's lower limbs have refused to stop flexing four decades after its inception. In the United States, Italo is a cult favorite of club-culture aficionados who possess a refined ear for electronic music's more camp and flamboyant proclivities. (Seattle represents it with Pony Bar's monthly DJ night, Medical Records Rx, headed by Dr. Troy and DJ Sh1t-r, who will be playing an Italo set in the NWFF lobby at 7 p.m.) Unlike its American counterpart, which embraced a more soulful vocal approach, Italo disco stressed infectious melodies and hedonistic lyrics, often coming across as an over-the-top take on synth pop. A high tolerance for cheesiness is almost mandatory to enjoy it; grumpy types may not understand all the fuss, but viewing Pietro Anton's 79-minute documentary Italo Disco Legacy will give you a greater understanding of this niche style's enduring charm. DAVE SEGAL
Northwest Film Forum
Thurs Aug 2

The Little Stranger
Sarah Waters's 2009 Gothic novel is summoned to life in this story of a doctor, Faraday, who travels to the mansion where his mother once worked as a housemaid to care for the ailing family living there. Secrets are stirred, bad memories return, things mysteriously catch on phantom fire, and the audience quails in terror, if director Lenny Abrahamson (Room) pulls it off.
Wide release
opening Fri Aug 31

Madonna: Truth or Dare
The Seattle Weekly once panned Madonna’s classic rockumentary Truth or Dare—and on its 20th anniversary! Rude!—while claiming the only interesting part of the film was “just how not scandalous” it was in our current age of pop princesses showing their vaginas on the internet. I agree that Truth or Dare, like anything approaching 30, has become less rowdy with age, but judging the film on its shock value (it was very shocking then, but it is not very shocking now) ignores the many ways Truth or Dare continues to influence global—and gay—culture. The film is stylish, bratty, and braver than it admits. CHASE BURNS
Central Cinema
Aug 10–15

The Meg
It’s “meg” as in “megalodon.” As in very large shark. As in Jason Statham hunting the crap out of said shark.
Wide release
opening Fri Aug 10

Mile 22
A secretive government agency that “gets things done” must protect a police officer with important knowledge in a foreign country. With Mark Wahlberg and directed by Peter Berg (Patriots Day, Hancock). More excitingly, it co-stars Ronda Rousey.
Wide release
opening Fri Aug 17

Milford Graves Full Mantis
Director Jake Meginsky delicately shapes a documentary around free jazz drummer Milford Graves's anecdotes and musical experiments—Rolling Stone has praised the film as "unpredictable, out-of-sync yet somehow rhythmically right on, jagged and likely to zig when you think it’s going to zag."
Northwest Film Forum
Aug 15–23

Minding the Gap
Bing Liu's youthful documentary follows his friends over 10 years of skateboarding and getting by despite marginalization, family troubles, and racism in Rockford, Illinois.
Northwest Film Forum
Aug 24–29

The Miseducation of Cameron Post
Even though this movie deservedly won the top prize at Sundance, I wasn’t initially sure we needed another story about a teenage lesbian forced to go to pray-away-the-gay conversion camp. However, a hell of a lot has changed since 1999 when But I’m a Cheerleader came out. Cameron Post (Chloë Grace Moretz) is sent to the camp after being caught with her pants down with another girl on her prom night. The irony is that sending gay kids to the same place provides them with a sense of community and the ability to discover they are not alone in the world. While not all of the kids make it out unscathed, Cameron is able to form a secret support group to survive. Infused with humor without being campy, this is a sophisticated and refreshingly honest adaptation of the Emily M. Danforth novel of the same name. CARL SPENCE
SIFF Cinema Uptown
opening Fri Aug 10

Movies at the Mural
Park your bum on some blankets in front of the Mural and see free, highly enjoyable and thought-provoking movies, like Get Out, I Am Not Your Negro, and Wonder Woman. Each screening will be preceded by short films by Cornish students.
Mural Amphitheatre
Thursdays, Aug 4–25

Moving History: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Film Forum
Probably the best and worst thing about my brain is the zeal with which it approaches the task of rummaging. The idea that the next stack of papers, the next bin of records, the next shelf of books, the next batch of DVDs, or the next weirdly unmarked reel of film is going to reveal some irreplaceable treasure is enough to keep me searching through dusty junk forever. This presentation appeals to that little particle in my psyche. Moving Image Preservation of Puget Sound scoured the vaults of local museums and libraries, and their findings include oral history recordings, archival footage, and photographs from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s Log House Museum, a “gay camp classic” from Scarecrow Video, selections from the recently digitized Vi Hilbert Collection at the UW Ethnomusicology Archives, as well as clips from Seattle Art Museum, King County Archives, and UW Libraries Special Collections. SEAN NELSON
Northwest Film Forum
Sun Aug 12

Nico, 1988
Susanna Nicchiarelli dramatizes the twilight of Nico (played by Danish actor Trine Dyrholm), the cavernous-voiced former singer of the Velvet Underground and later independent artist, as she reluctantly heads out on a last tour, struggles with drug use and mental illness, and tries to reconcile with her estranged son. It certainly looks downbeat, but perhaps also more nuanced and affecting than your average musician biopic.
Grand Illusion
Aug 10–16

North Bend Film Festival
The hometown of many Twin Peaks shoots debuts a new film festival of strange, Northwest-themed movies.
North Bend Theatre
Aug 23–26

One Sings, The Other Doesn't
When you think of Serious French Cinema, as embodied by Major French Filmmaker Agnès Varda (Faces Places, The Gleaners and I), you might not think of a joyful hippie musical about abortion, marriage, and sisterhood. Yet this 1977 Belgian-Venezuelan-French co-production is exactly that.
Grand Illusion
Aug 17–23

Operation Finale
World War II is over, but Adolf Eichmann (Ben Kingsley), responsible for engineering millions of deaths and nearly annihilating European Jewry, is still alive, hiding out in Argentina under the name Ricardo Klement. Israeli agent Peter Malkin (Oscar Isaac) heads a mission to kidnap the war criminal and bring him to justice. This thriller, based on fact, is directed by Chris Weitz, who will be making the transition from making a Twilight movie to portraying Nazi-hunting. Huh.
TBD
opening Fri Aug 29

Outland
This 1981 Sean Connery space thriller might recall The Expanse to modern viewers. Miners on Io, a moon of Jupiter, start killing themselves and others in bizarre ways, and Marshal O'Neil decides to get to the bottom of it. His investigation turns up a deadly drug, a corrupt boss, and a terrifying plot.
Grand Illusion
Aug 3–7

Papillon
Charlie Hunnam takes on the mantle of Steve McQueen in this remake of the classic action film about a framed French prisoner who, together with a wily counterfeiter, daringly escapes from a brutal South American jail. Those are some big shoes to fill—both of McQueen and of the real-life escapee, Henri "Papillon" Charrière—but so far, it's gotten decent reviews.
TBD
opening Fri Aug 24

Pit Stop
The cinema describes this film as a "slam-bang crash-o-rama" from 1968; it exploded into being under the direction of Jack Hill, also responsible for Spider Baby, The Cheerleaders, and Foxy Brown. A young man is inducted into the world of dangerous "figure-8" racing, but can he survive? Co-starring Ellen Burstyn!
Grand Illusion
Aug 25–28

Puzzle
I occasionally try to finish puzzles on the ferry to Orcas Island, but I never knew there was a world of competitive puzzling. Marc Turtletaub (producer of Little Miss Sunshine, Safety Not Guaranteed, and Loving) wonderfully directs this sweet journey of a woman who discovers her uncanny knack for puzzles and has an awakening to pursue a more extraordinary life beyond the confines of her ordinary family. Kelly Macdonald (Boardwalk Empire, Trainspotting) is pitch-perfect as Agnes, and Bollywood star Irrfan Khan makes a great puzzle partner and protagonist to open Agnes’s mind and heart to explore her dreams and desires. Midlife crisis stories have so rarely focused on a woman character, and Macdonald refreshingly illuminates Agnes’s spirit as she discovers how to live, love, and make her own path for the future. CARL SPENCE
SIFF Cinema Uptown
opening Fri Aug 17

Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood
When the strain of being a wholesome heartthrob got too much for straight or queer movie stars and other artists in Hollywood in the '40s and '50s, they'd turn to gas station owner Scotty Bowers, who hooked them up with the partners they were truly hoping for. Documentarian Matt Tyrnauer has the "cinéma-vérité" story. Oh my, Cole Porter, what did you do with "15 guys one after the other"??
SIFF Film Center
opening Fri Aug 24

Searching
John Cho plays a frantic father who discovers that his missing teenage daughter has some deep, nasty secrets in this thriller told entirely through laptop and cell phone screens and cameras. It's a little like the concept of Unfriended: Dark Web, but looks a little higher of brow (and tense as hell). It asks us: What does it mean if our real lives are contained in our devices, while our families know nothing about us?
TBD
opening Fri Aug 24

Slender Man
You've heard the urban legend; maybe you've even played the pants-wetting video game. Now watch the faceless, wriggle-fingered Mr. Slender prey upon a group of sweet-faced teen girls stupid enough to summon him.
Various locations
opening Fri Aug 10

Sound and Vision Film Festival
For the first time, the megatheatre will focus on the harmony of sight and sound, with excellently soundtracked movies like Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049, Mad Max: Fury Road (Black & Chrome), Mulholland Drive, Total Recall, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and Stop Making Sense.
Cinerama
Aug 17–30

South Pacific 60th Anniversary
Adapted from the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical of the same name, the 1958 film stars Rossano Brazzi, Mitzi Gaynor, John Kerr, and Ray Waltson. See it again and sing along with "Some Enchanted Evening," "I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Out of My Hair," and "There Is Nothin' Like a Dame."
AMC Pacific Place
Aug 26 & 29

The Spy Who Dumped Me
Audrey (Mila Kunis) and her roommate Morgan (Kate McKinnon) are embroiled in a far-ranging conspiracy when Audrey’s boyfriend crashes their apartment with assassins in pursuit.
Wide release
opening Fri Aug 3

Summer Rewind Film Festival
If you missed some of the best and most blockbusting movies of the year—from the creepily psychedelic Annihilation to the boggle-brained Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom to snarky Deadpool to the absolutely traumatizing Hereditary—catch them on an overwhelmingly big screen. Even if you have seen all these films, consider going again.
NB: The Stranger is not responsible if you pee yourself watching Hereditary on the giant screen.
Cinerama
Aug 31–Sept 6

Support the Girls
Andrew Bujalski (Funny Ha Ha, Computer Chess) helms this feminist comedy about the manager of a Hooters stand-in, Double Whammies, who manages to make her big-breasted team into a chosen family despite the fact that their boss is a towering racist bully. Crowd-pleasing revenge ensues. Regina Hall and Haley Lu Richardson are two of the cast members carrying this good-natured film on their capable shoulders.
Grand Illusion
Aug 24–30

Taste of Cement
Ziad Khaltoum's devastating documentary focuses on Syrian migrant construction workers who must cope with the strictures and prejudice of the Lebanese authorities (they have a 7 p.m. curfew every night) and the knowledge that their own homes are being destroyed. Important but painful viewing that reminds us of the horror of being displaced with no possibility of return.
Northwest Film Forum
Thurs Aug 16

That Summer
If you know of Edith and Edie Beale, the formerly wealthy and deeply eccentric Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis relatives with bizarre private lives and a broken-down Montauk abode, it's because they were immortalized in the Maysles's brothers 1975 documentary Grey Gardens. Göran Olsson, maker of The Black Power Mixtape, combines footage of and by photographer Peter Beard, the Maysles, Jonas Mekas, and Andy Warhol, all from three years before the Maysles's film's release.
Northwest Film Forum
Aug 8–12

The Third Murder
Celebrated director Hirokazu Kore-eda (After the Storm) has made the excellent decision of casting Kojî Yakusho (Cure, Shall We Dance) as a man who's confessed to killing his own boss. His lawyer, played by Masaharu Fukuyama (Creepy), sets out to save his client from the almost-certain death penalty and discovers that the apparently straightforward crime is much less clear than it seems.
SIFF Cinema Uptown
opening Fri Aug 24

Wanda
The timing of the programming of this essential work of feminist cinema coincides nicely with the return of Karina Longworth’s film history podcast, You Must Remember This, which dedicated one of its most memorable episodes to its writer/director/star, Barbara Loden. The story of a woman in a coal-mining town who drifts through the events of her life—divorce, abandonment, sex, crime—so passively that you can’t help but reflect on what must be happening in her interior life, draws on such classic high-low influences as early Jean-Luc Godard, Chantal Akerman, and Warhol/Morrissey. But unlike those others, Loden is also a skilled, experienced, fascinating actor, whose lead performance also offers an enigmatic critique on what is and isn’t expected from women on-screen. SEAN NELSON
Northwest Film Forum
Aug 1–4

Wayne's World
A spin-off of a SNL skit about two dumbass metalheads who host a public-access show in their basement, which, in the film adaptation, catches the attention of a slimy TV executive who gives them a fatty TV deal. Hilarity and conflict ensue. This was one of those films that shouldn’t have been so commercially successful (it grossed $121 million, the highest of 1992), or become so deeply rooted in pop culture that some of us can still recite lines from it, while not actually realizing we’re doing so (“That’s what she said”—yeah, I know it’s a one-liner way older than Wayne’s World, but they brought it back into the public consciousness), or make Mike Meyers into a romantic male lead, albeit briefly (remember So I Married an Axe Murderer?). Also, Wayne’s World will forever get credit for introducing me to “Foxy Lady” (I was 12 and not well-versed in Jimi Hendrix), “Dream Weaver” (yacht rock at its best), and “Bohemian Rhapsody” (the group sing-along scene in the car is one of my favorite things ever—I still crack up about Dixie cup barf dude). In sum, it’s a ’90s-era comedy classic that isn’t award-worthy, but is pretty righteous. LEILANI POLK
Central Cinema
Aug 10–14

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.