Despite the name, Oktoberfest season starts in September, and Seattle has several festivals for the occasion, including the huge Fremont Oktoberfest. Bold Hat Productions
September marks both the end of summer and the start of fall, bringing with it not only cooler weather, but also a robust arts season, plenty of big-name concerts, and autumnal festivals. Below, we've rounded up the 150 biggest events that you should know about, including city-wide events like the Seattle Design Festival and the MEXAM Northwest Festival, food events like An Incredible Feast and the Washington Artisan Cheesemakers Festival, concerts like Macklemore and Florence + the Machine, literary events like the Hugo House Grand Reopening Celebration and an evening with John Kerry, performances like RuPaul's Drag Race: Werq The World and the Jerome Robbins Festival, film festivals like Local Sightings and French Cinema Now, and athletic events like the Beat the Blerch race and the Seahawks' first official home game. Click through the links below for complete details, and, as always, find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

SEPTEMBER 1-FEBRUARY 10

ART

1. WW1 America
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Armistice, signed on November 11, 1918. MOHAI hosts a body of artifacts, recordings, multimedia presentations, and more, created by the Minnesota History Center, to reveal a picture of America between 1914-1919—its contradictions, hopes, terrors, and dizzying transformations.

SEPTEMBER 6–16

FOOD & DRINK

2. Washington Cider Week
Freak out about cider at approximately a billion tastings, parties, etc. during a week so special, it lasts 11 days!

SEPTEMBER 6–21

FESTIVALS

3. Seattle Design Festival
Now in its eighth year, Design in Public's Seattle Design Festival explores how urbanism, architecture, and design can further justice, ecology, and community. 2018's theme, "Trust," will focus on bringing together diverse local communities with a lineup of arts events, panels, installations, discussions, and fun parties. Highlights include the Seattle Design Festival Block Party (Sept 8–9); the opening celebration for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Discovery Center’s Design with the 90% (Thurs Sept 13), which will showcase 26 design projects focused on improving health and communities around the world; and PARK(ing) Day (Fri Sept 21), on which Seattleites will create pop-up parks and mini-playgrounds in parking spaces across town, with an awards ceremony wrap-up at the Center for Architecture and Design.

SEPTEMBER 6–29

ART

4. Sister Mary Corita Kent: Selected Works
Born in Fort Dodge, Iowa, Sister Mary Corita Kent entered a convent at age 18. In 1947, during graduate school at the University of Southern California, she fell in love with screenprinting. Influenced by Andy Warhol, the slogans of the Civil Rights era, and her own commitment to consider poverty, racism, and injustice from a spiritual perspective, Corita Kent created one of the boldest, most distinctive bodies of 20th century poster art. After heading up the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles for a number of years (where she could often be seen screenprinting in a full nun's habit) she left the order and moved to Boston, where her work took on a more introspective style. EMILY POTHAST

SEPTEMBER 7

MUSIC

5. A.R. Rahman, Guests
I have always thought that the hardest thing in music at any level of difficulty (be it pop, classical, or jazz) is the melody. A tune can survive a bad beat, but never a bad melody. Melodies are so simple (a few notes), yet you need a great gift to compose them. Rahman has that gift. He also has a wonderfully smooth way of connecting these parts: the futuristic (electronica), European classical harmonic structures, American jazz and funk bass lines, and that rolling Punjabi dhol beat. Born in 1967 in Madras (now Chennai), India, Rahman has a career in Bollywood that spans nearly 30 years. He has won numerous awards, including two Oscars for Slumdog Millionaire (and was nominated for the song “O… Saya,” which features rapper/singer M.I.A.). He has recorded with the legendary Lata Mangeshkar, a singer I discovered after the soundtrack for Lagaan sent me into the Bollywood rabbit hole (I watched Satyam Shivam Sundaram; I saw the most gorgeous woman to ever appear on film, Zeenat Aman; I heard the heavenly voice of Mangeshkar). Some have called Rahman “the Mozart of Madras.” I consider him to be the Mozart of Now. It is worth making the trip up to Everett for the rare chance to see him perform. CHARLES MUDEDE

6. Eptic
Belgium's Eptic (Michaël Bella) plays wild, hyperkinetic dubstep for the masses. He'll set out on his Anti-Human Tour this fall with additional guests.

7. Evanescence, Lindsey Stirling
Classical violinist Lindsey Stirling is trying to cross over to the pop and EDM worlds. It’s a bit of an awkward fit, fusing virtuosic strings redolent of 19th-century Europe with the distorted bass drops and massive, splashy beats of this decade’s brostep. But one must give credit to Stirling for attempting such an unlikely commingling of musical elements. Against the odds, her bold stab at making stuffy classical music shake its ass has garnered Stirling a large following. This show is part of her joint orchestra tour with Evanescence, the gothic rock band who reached peak popularity in the early '00s with their singles "Bring Me to Life" and "My Immortal." DAVE SEGAL

8. Rodrigo y Gabriela
Rodrigo Sánchez and Gabriela Quintero have been pushing out instrumental-guitar-driven duets, mostly minus a full band, for more than 18 years. They both wield acoustic axes, and employ choppy technicality and stylistic qualities that complement each other—Rodrigo is the quicksilver picker and fret-jumper, Gabriela the strummer with intense rhythmicality, and both bust out beats on the bodies of their guitars. While their sound is clearly rooted in the flamenco of their Mexico City home, both were weaned on rock, heavy metal, and jazz—and elements from all three come out in their playing and the covers that show up on their albums (like Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” off their self-titled LP) and live performances (e.g., a medley of Metallica’s “One” and Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five”). LEILANI POLK

9. Scotty McCreery
Chart-topping Scotty McCreery, the winner of American Idol's 10th season, will headline the Washington State Fair's Dancin' in the Dirt party. After the concert, head to the rodeo arena to keep dancing to country hits.

10. Teyana Taylor, DaniLeigh
R&B stand-out star Teyana Taylor will play a set of hits from her latest full-length album, K.T.S.E., with an opening set by DaniLeigh.

SEPTEMBER 7-8

FOOD & DRINK

11. Cider Summit Seattle
At the ninth edition of this annual festival, guests can try more than 150 fermented-fruit beverages, including both regional and international varieties. Cideries in attendance will include well-known names like France's Louis Raison, Portland-based Reverend Nat’s, Woodinville’s Locust Cider, Seattle Cider, Schilling, and many others. In the “heritage cider” tent, you’ll also find more obscure sips like lavender lemon fizzy wine from Portland producer Hi-Wheel and apple-pie mead from New Hampshire’s Moonlight Meadery. Capitol Cider and other vendors will provide food. JULIANNE BELL

MUSIC

12. The Growlers
If the Strokes grew up surfing in Southern California instead of doing coke in New York, you’d probably have a band that sounds like the Growlers. The Orange County outfit makes artfully disheveled, hook-filled rock with chiming guitars, and singer Brooks Nielsen shares his cool-guy-nursing-a-hangover vocal stylings with Julian Casablancas. (It’s probably not a coincidence that the band is signed to Casablancas’s Cult Records.) The band’s most recent material leans on keyboardist Kyle Straka, whose synth textures and touches of vintage-sounding organ lend some needed variety to a familiar sound. ANDREW GOSPE

SEPTEMBER 7-9

FESTIVALS

13. Chinook Fest
Chinook Fest spends three days every summer boasting plenty of camping, artisanal food, craft booze, and some of the finest roots rock, blues, Americana, country, and folk artists out there, like Austin Jenckes, Jonathan Tyler, Whitney Mongé, the Wicks, and more. Friday and Saturday are for the grown-ups, but Sunday's festivities are all ages.

FILM

14. SECS Fest 2018
The not-so-coyly named SECS FEST presents cinematic tales to titillate, including two new features, four shorts programs, and two classics. See sex in every genre, and hear special talks by special guests. Some screenings are preceded or followed by special talks by guest academics, BDSM practitioners, film professionals, and others. The cherry on top is usually the wrap party on Sunday.

SEPTEMBER 7-13

FILM

15. The Wife
Golden Bear-winning director Björn Runge directs Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce in a story of a deteriorating marriage, based on a novel by Meg Wolitzer. Self-sacrificing wife Joan has spent her life supporting her writer husband. Now, on the eve of the Nobel Prize ceremony, she's ready to confront him.

SEPTEMBER 7-20

FILM

16. 70mm Film Festival
Put down your phone and surrender to the splendor of actually-epic-scale cinema in the cathedral that is the Cinerama. Not much unites the films in this 13-day festival other than a commitment to MAGNITUDE, but several are essential viewing. I know you’ve heard it before, but I’ll say it again: Seeing a film in a darkened theater with strangers is a secular sacrament. The fact that you can't pause, talk, text, or tweet until it's over is a feature. Please enjoy it while it's still available. SEAN NELSON

SEPTEMBER 7-30

PERFORMANCE

17. Skylight
A young woman flees a long-term affair with a rich married restaurateur when his ailing wife finds them out. Having previously lived in splendid comfort virtually as a member of their happy extended family, she now lives in self-imposed exile, working with poor, violent kids who have even fewer resources than she does. Then late one night, her former lover’s son shows up to ask why she abandoned him. Shortly after he leaves, his father’s limo rolls up. David Hare’s drama, originally produced in 1995 and later revived in 2015 (with Bill Nighy and Carey Mulligan, just to give you a sense of the age disparity), is a strange combination of trenchant and way out of step with the psycho-social and psycho-sexual temperature of 2018. But, like most of his major works, it’s funny and involving, and it serves as a cracking showcase for two actors who know what they’re doing. SEAN NELSON

SEPTEMBER 7-NOVEMBER 4

PERFORMANCE

18. Cirque du Soleil VOLTA
Every Cirque show I’ve experienced has abounded with breath taking, eye-popping visuals as well as awe-inspiring feats of movement by Cirque’s cast of dancers, physical actors, athletes, acrobats, contortionists, aerialists, and other circus performers. The subject matter of Volta, Cirque’s 41st production, involves extreme sports, touching on (but not limited to) shape diving, BMX, and rope skipping. LEILANI POLK

SEPTEMBER 8

COMMUNITY

19. Smoke Farm Symposium
This annual symposium brings together scholars, scientists, artists, and environmentalists alike for a day of lectures culminating in a communal dinner prepared by local chef Monica Dimas of Milkwood & Co. This year's speakers include author and theologist Lesley Hazleton, UW professor of medicine Dr. Barak Gaster, author and natural historian Eileen Delehanty Pearkes, and author Rebecca Brown.

FOOD & DRINK

20. 4th Annual Sweet Corn Festival
Harvest season wouldn't be complete without a festival dedicated to all things corn: roasted corn, kettle corn, corn mazes, and corn shucking contests, to be specific. Plus, in addition to regional vendors who show up every year, this year will also feature the cereal grain wares of kids who have been growing their own corn.

21. Chinatown-ID Night Market
Traditionally, night markets are a place to stroll, shop, and nosh on tasty street-food snacks. This annual festival, which draws upwards of 25,000 people each year, takes place beneath the historic Chinatown gate in the International District, and features a slew of Asian street food alongside handmade local goods, fresh cut flowers, and more, plus entertainment that includes live bands and breakdancing groups. Past vendors have included stuffed-waffle supplier BeanFish, seafood boil restaurant Crawfish King, and Hawaiian shave-ice purveyor Mike’s Shave Ice. This year promises to yield an equally delicious lineup. JULIANNE BELL

MUSIC

22. Andrew W.K.
Wasn’t Andrew W.K. just here? Yes, he was. The leader of the Party Party (yep) sold out Neumos on his last run through, but that was before his nine-years-in-the-making fifth album, You’re Not Alone, was released. It’s a good record, packed with the kind of bulldozing power pop for which Andrew W.K. is known. It’s not nearly as good as his debut, I Get Wet, but that’s fine because he’s still going to play the most crucial blasts from that seminal release on this iteration. Here’s hoping Showbox opts out of barricades so we can have a stage dive Saturday. JOSEPH SCHAFER

23. Sam Smith, Beth Ditto
King of Tears Sam Smith will take over Seattle for an evening of heartbreaking soul-inflected pop music thanks to his The Thrill Of It All Tour. Fiery singer Beth Ditto will join Sam for a few tour dates, including this Seattle stop.

SEPTEMBER 8-9

FOOD & DRINK

24. Bacon Eggs & Kegs
This festival revolving around the combination of savory, gut-busting breakfast foods and heady booze promises concoctions like fried chicken waffle nuggets, corn bread bacon Benedict, biscuits with bacon-fat gravy, and beer-battered pancakes. Day drinking is encouraged with more than 80 brews from 40 breweries and cideries, plus mimosas, boozy root-beer floats, Irish coffee, and a 30-foot Bloody Mary bar with dozens upon dozens of toppings (including tater tots, mozzarella sticks, jalapeño poppers, veggies, herbs, pickles, puffed Cheetos, bacon, and pork rinds). You’re probably going to want to clear your schedule for that requisite post-brunch nap. JULIANNE BELL

MUSIC

25. Jason Mraz, Brett Dennen
Someone's got to be the less-douchey John Mayer, and there's no better contender than Jason Mraz, a perfectly good guy making perfectly nice music that will not make you cover your ears in horror should you happen to hear it on the radio or in the supermarket. He's funny, humble, pro-gay, and he wears hats. DAVE SEGAL

SEPTEMBER 8-OCTOBER 6

PERFORMANCE

26. Prelude to a Kiss
Strawberry Theatre Workshop last-minute swapped out Reckless for this play by Craig Lucas, about a woman who may or may not have switched bodies with a sick octogenarian during her honeymoon, and her husband who gradually comes to realize that his beautiful young wife is harboring the soul of an old man. Lucas's work has been seen as an allegory for AIDS; it was nominated for the 1990 Tony Award and the Pulitzer Prize. The cast of Reckless—including MJ Sieber, Anastasia Higham, and Galen Joseph Osier—will appear in this play instead.

SEPTEMBER 9

MUSIC

27. What So Not
What So Not was originally the duo of Chris Emerson and Harley Streten, until the latter left to focus on Flume, his immensely successful solo project. In its current iteration, What So Not has collaborated with Skrillex and RL Grime. Those three names give a good indication of the sort of tasteful big-box bass music that Emerson produces. On debut Not All the Beautiful Things, he splits his time between atmospheric melodrama and manicured beats-and-bass stuff that recalls the game-of-telephone EDM version of dubstep popular earlier this decade. Emerson’s music isn’t bad, exactly, but rarely does it rise above Mad Decent. ANDREW GOSPE

READINGS & TALKS

28. Sonia Sotomayor
As the future of the Supreme Court has us all on tenterhooks, hear from Justice Sonia Sotomayor as she fetes the release of two children's books, Turning Pages: My Life Story and The Beloved World of Sonia Sotomayor. Sotomayor will answer pre-submitted questions and sign books after the event.

SEPTEMBER 10

FILM

29. Slice
A few years ago, cool-kids film distro company A24 announced they'd be releasing Austin Vesely's Slice, a pizza-themed horror flick starring Chance the Rapper, Atlanta's Zazie Beetz, and that guy with the hair from Stranger Things. Since then, there's been little news about it—until this week, when it was revealed Slice will screen for one night only, in 21 cities, on September 10. Seattle's one of 'em. Should you see Slice? YOUR CALL. On the upside, hey, that's a good trailer, and that's a great cast; on the downside, it isn't being screened for critics, which isn't a great sign, and national one-night-only screenings are usually reserved for cinematic masterpieces such as Primal Rage: Bigfoot Reborn. So, as with pizza delivery, audiences will be taking their chances. ERIK HENRIKSEN

MUSIC

30. Florence + the Machine, St. Vincent, Lizzo
Florence + the Machine aren’t for those who like restraint in their pop music. On their 2009 debut, Lungs, Florence Welch pours her heart into every lyric as pianist Isabella Summers and a bevy of backup singers struggle to keep pace. It’s Adele by way of a Technicolor melodrama. If Florence + the Machine tone things down on this year’s High as Hope, drama remains their stock in trade. No slouch when it comes to theatricality, St. Vincent deserves her own stadium-headlining tour on the strength of a discography that includes last year’s Jack Antonoff–produced Masseduction. Add Prince-approved Minneapolis rapper Lizzo, and this bill becomes unmissable. KATHY FENNESSY

READINGS & TALKS

31. Gary Shteyngart: Lake Success
Seattle novelist Maria Semple calls Gary Shteyngart’s latest novel, Lake Success, “the funniest book you’ll read all year.” She also says: “What begins as a rollicking and zinger-filled road trip sneakily deepens into a poignant tale of a man trying to outrace his problems. I was utterly floored.” Shteyngart’s appearances in Seattle are reliably as rollicking and zinger-filled as his books. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

SEPTEMBER 11-16

PERFORMANCE

32. Waitress
Remember that 2007 movie starring Keri Russell as the waitress who bakes her feelings? Vaguely, at least? That’s okay, you can refresh your memory by checking out the fresh-from-Broadway musical adaptation that’s stopping for a run at the Paramount Theatre. The reviews of Waitress were “mixed-to-positive,” but it garnered four Tony nominations, which is saying something. It didn’t win any of the Tonys it was nominated for, which is also saying something. Sara Bareilles—the singer-songwriter responsible for that ubiquitous 2007 hit “Love Song”—wrote the score. It’s about pie. It’ll be good. NATHALIE GRAHAM

SEPTEMBER 12

MUSIC

33. Lucius, Cornelia Murr
Brooklyn five-piece Lucius have repeatedly proven their knack for delivering perfectly articulated pop that rolls out with fiery sass. This year, the group changed up their dynamics and unleashed Nudes, which strips off the slick pop in favor of an acoustic blend. Their artistic challenge paid off in this format; Lucius’s multi-instrumental talents are much more pronounced paired with the flexible vocal stylings of Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig. Solo cosmic-pop artist Cornelia Murr—who recently worked with producer Jim James of My Morning Jacket on her latest effort, Lake Tear of the Clouds—opens the night. ABBIE GOBELI

SEPTEMBER 12-OCTOBER 7

PERFORMANCE

34. Richard III
Last year, the crew of upstart crow collective produced an all-female adaptation of Shakespeare's Henry VI that was so good, it actually made people want to see a production of Henry VI. I reckon they'll have the same luck with this classic tale of throne-hungry villainy. Top-notch veteran actor Sarah Hartlett will take on the title role. RICH SMITH

SEPTEMBER 13

FILM

35. 'Mandy' Opening
This movie, much anticipated by fans of gonzo and Nicholas Cage's facial acrobatics, follows a man seeking bloody revenge on a religious sect that killed his love (Andrea Riseborough). Directed by Panos Cosmatos.

MUSIC

36. Boy George and Culture Club, Thompson Twins' Tom Bailey
Eccentric pop cult figure/trailblazing weirdo Boy George has retained an effortlessly freakish cool since Culture Club enjoyed their biggest fame in the 1980s. Their reggae-infused, radio-ready songs immersed listeners in a smooth, festive pop paradise where neon eye makeup and passionate sax solos reigned supreme. Fortunately for nostalgia-seekers, the set lists for this tour have been drafted to please, with all the big hits represented (“Karma Chameleon,” “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me”). If you want to be transported to a time when the cell phones were even bigger than the hair, I suggest indulging in a Washington State Fair getaway, because Boy George and company are sure to provide inescapably good vibes. Besides, do you really need another reason to get day-drunk with your mom? BRITTNIE FULLER

37. Lake Street Dive
Dance-party-ready pop group Lake Street Dive will play in support of their last album Side Pony.

38. Porter Robinson's Virtual Self
Porter Robinson is a mainstream EDM producer and DJ, and I know you were wondering when and where you could possibly find more of that! Yes, the music generally sounds something like a shiny bundle of Passion Pit, Forever 21, and soft robot voices cooing positive affirmations, but the multimedia live show promises to be something to feast your bloodshot eyes upon. According to Robinson's bio, "It's a hyperreal, video-game-fueled dream come to life..." EMILY NOKES

PERFORMANCE

39. Adam Carolla Show
Hollywood staple Adam Carolla will record an episode of his podcast about his personal industry, the movie biz, and stuff that annoys him. He'll be joined by Gina Grad and Bald Bryan.

SEPTEMBER 13-16

PERFORMANCE

40. Rachel Mars: Our Carnal Hearts
What capitalists call "ambition," UK performer Rachel Mars and her female choir call a cocktail of envy, self-doubt, guilt, and regret. More than any virtue, it's these spiky sins that drive us to act. Or so the artists argue in this playful and extremely cathartic-sounding avant-garde production. The 60-minute explosion of a show premiered at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival last year, and so far, everyone's been raving about it. Powder, fire, rubber chickens, and the strong smell of coffee figure heavily in the performance, so the show should find a happy home here in Seattle. RICH SMITH

SEPTEMBER 13-OCTOBER 14

PERFORMANCE

41. Jane Eyre
Book-It's inaugural play of the 2018-2019 season is based on Charlotte Brontë's Gothic novel about an orphaned young woman who becomes a governess to the handsome but taciturn Edward Rochester and discovers strange goings-on in her new home.

SEPTEMBER 14

FILM

42. 'Pick of the Litter' Opening
Watch five puppies—Primrose, Poppet, Patriot, Potomac, and Phil—grow up to become guide dogs. Or flunk out of guide dog school and just be cute pups.

MUSIC

43. Angel Olsen, Hand Habits
Angel Olsen just has one of those voices that knocks you down—visceral and versatile, familiar but foreign, public yet private, equally compelling in wail and whisper. And after three increasingly killer records, Olsen delivered a proper masterpiece with My Woman. SEAN NELSON

44. Leon Bridges, Khruangbin
It takes stones to reach all the way back to the middle of the 20th century for inspiration, but here we go. Leon Bridges, fresh out of Fort Worth, has pipes to rival the soul and gospel greats of the past, and gives off the deeply felt sense that he’s been immersing himself in the sounds of yesteryear since he was womb-side. His debut album, Coming Home, slathers Bridges’s voice and guitar in that mid-century fuzz and surrounds him with a crackerjack session band, for a collection of tracks that don’t sound timeless so much as full of time, of history, of the past. The songwriting isn’t going to have Sam Cooke rolling in his grave any time soon, but if Bridges can somehow render this sound as three-dimensionally as his forebears, he’s got potential far beyond the golden-oldies revivalist circuit. KYLE FLECK

SEPTEMBER 14-23

FESTIVALS

45. Mid-Autumn Festival Celebrations
The Mid-Autumn Festival, a Chinese and Vietnamese harvest celebration that traditionally falls on a full moon and features mooncakes, will be celebrated at the Chinatown-International District’s Children’s Mid-Autumn Moon Festival (Fri Sept 14), the Tacoma Moon Festival (Sat Sept 15), UW’s Mid-Autumn Lantern Festival (Tues Sept 25), Lucky Envelope Brewing’s Mid-Autumn Festival (Sat Sept 22), and the Meydenbauer Center’s Moon Festival Melody: Cello Fusion concert (Sun Sept 23).

SEPTEMBER 14-JANUARY 6

ART

46. Group Therapy
Group Therapy features a roster of international artists addressing themes of healing and self-care through a range of media. With its proximity to Harborview Medical Center (the region’s largest trauma care hospital) and several other hospitals, the museum will also function as a community “free clinic” with immersive installations and participatory projects. By including racism, sexism, and political tribalism as social pathologies, the show reframes what it means to be ill in the 21st century and offers community building as one possible curative. Artists include Wynne Greenwood, Maryam Jafri, Joachim Koester, Liz Magic Laser, Leigh Ledare, Marcos Lutyens, Cindy Mochizuki, Shana Moulton, Pedro Reyes, Ann Leda Shapiro, Kandis Williams, and Lauryn Youden. KATIE KURTZ

SEPTEMBER 15

FOOD & DRINK

47. 2018 Washington Artisan Cheesemakers Festival
Fromage fanciers, rejoice: At this festival celebrating “the terroir of Washington,” 20 artisan and farmstead cheese makers from all over the state will gather to share their creamy wares, including washed-rind, mixed-milk, caved-aged, and raw varieties. The lineup features a coterie of choice cheesemongers and covetable creameries, like Beecher’s, Twin Sisters, Golden Glen, Mt. Townsend, and more, as well as accompaniments from artisans like preserves producer Girl Meets Dirt, plus local beer and wine. Additionally, take a deep dive into all things funky and odiferous in a seminar about washed-rind cheeses. Admission includes three beverage tastes and all the cheese your dairy-loving heart desires. Proceeds benefit the Washington State Cheesemakers Association. JULIANNE BELL

48. East Ballard Oktoberfest
Traditional oompah band the Oompah Machine will lead a lederhosen-laden procession with stops at Reuben's Brews, Stoup Brewing, Lucky Envelope, and Populuxe. Each stop will feature commemorative steins, Oktoberfest beers, and food trucks.

49. Hops & Crops Music and Beer Festival
Head to Kent for live music and craft brews to support the farm's education regionally focused environmental education programs. Bad Jimmy's, Dystopian State Brewing, Fish, Flying Lion, and Fremont are just a few participating breweries, with food for purchase from Bread and Circuses, Hot Revolution Donuts, and Tacos La Flaca.

50. Trucktoberfest
For their third annual festival, the Mobile Food Rodeo will boast over 25 local and regional breweries whose offerings you can sip in an outdoor beer garden. There will also be plenty of food trucks outside the tasting areas, which welcome guests of all ages.

MUSIC

51. The Avett Brothers, The Head & The Heart, Shovels & Rope
Folk familiars the Avett Brothers will break out their woo-woo approach to Americana this summer, their years of work heavily driven by pleasant harmony-riddled messages of good and evil, banjo and fiddle. They'll be joined by the Head & the Heart and Shovels & Rope.

52. Blood Orange
Devonté Hynes—better known by his stage name, Blood Orange—will return to Seattle for a night of slinky pop and dance-beat R&B that is both empowering and energizing.

53. Boz Scaggs
Guitarist Boz Scaggs started his musical career in the Midwest playing in garage bands like the Marksmen and the Ardells with fellow guitar-picker Steve Miller and, though he split for Europe in 1965, by 1967 Scaggs had reunited with Miller in the Steve Miller Band. A year later, Scaggs went solo and in the mid 1970s and early ’80s he scored a string of FM hits. Since those hit-making days, he has continued working, but he’s fallen into a niche, much like his ’60s and ’70s contemporaries, where he still tours and records sporadically but makes no concessions to contemporary pop charts. Now Scaggs shows up and lays down some easy, deeply shaded urban blues, soulful ’70s rock, in his patented, laid-back style. MIKE NIPPER

54. Ms. Lauryn Hill Performing the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill
We have said more than enough already about Lauryn Hill’s personal shit. Let’s just stop the gossip and focus our attention on the fact that hiphop has only a handful of female rappers who really made it big (meaning, entered the mainstream) by selling nothing but skills, and Ms. Lauryn Hill is one of those rappers. Her name is on two albums in the hiphop canon—the Fugees’ The Score and The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill. There is also the raw boom-bap of the track “Lost Ones,” which is on Miseducation and put any doubt about her skills on the mic in the grave. So none of this talking behind her back—let’s just show some respect to someone who contributed to the great adventure of hiphop. CHARLES MUDEDE

55. NEEDTOBREATHE, Johnnyswim, Forest Blakk
Southern rockers NEEDTOBREATHE will bring their South Carolinian shred to Seattle on their Forever On Your Side Tour, ostensibly named for the camaraderie you'll feel once you experience the unbridled energy of their live show along with openers Johnnyswim and Forest Black.

SPORTS & RECREATION

56. Beat the Blerch
This run is inspired by Matthew Inman, the creator of the Oatmeal comic, who wrote about his running experiences with "the blerch." In addition to the scenic, flat course through the woods (runners can choose between a 10K, a half marathon, or a full marathon), there will be cake at every station, couches along the course, an appearance from Inman himself, and costumed blerches who will chase you.

57. Night Nation Run
At the "world's first running music festival," runners will wait for nightfall to make their way along a course punctuated by party zones full of live EDM music and interactive light shows. Prepare to get glowy and sweaty.

SEPTEMBER 15-16

FESTIVALS

58. Fiestas Patrias
Mexico, Honduras, Costa Rica, and many other Latin American countries celebrate their independence days in the middle of September, and, at the same time, Seattle celebrates the culture of Latinos living in the Northwest with three Fiestas Patrias events, each featuring traditional music, dance, food, folklore, and more. Sea Mar Community Health Centers will host a colorful parade in South Park, which will abound with mariachi bands and Mexican cowboys on dancing horses. A festival at Seattle Center will provide a similar array of merriment, as well as history lessons on how the countries gained independence from Spanish rule. There will also be a celebration of Mexican culture at the Washington State Fair, which will feature live music, traditional food, and folk dancers.

GEEK

59. Rencon 2018
Embrace your geekiest interests with two days of comics, cosplay, games, artist panels, and vendors.

SEPTEMBER 16

FILM

60. TOO MUCH! with Lindy West, Ijeoma Oluo, and More!
The Stranger's own Charles Mudede, bestselling author and former Stranger writer Lindy West, and musician/comedian Ahamefule J. Oluo (whose music you can hear on The Stranger's Blabbermouth podcast every week) will gather to talk about their upcoming independent film Thin Skin, based on Oluo's stage show Now I'm Fine.

MUSIC

61. UB40 with Ali Campbell, Astro, and Mickey Virtue
England’s UB40 became a viable franchise by redoing reggae songs, and sometimes non-reggae songs, into catchy, synth-pushed sing-along-easy stuff labeled Labour of Love, volumes 1–4. This is actually very catchy stuff and, yes, moms like it—my mom, anyway. It’s hard to remember that UB40 named themselves after a piece of paperwork to join the dole, or that original singer Ali Campbell bought gear for his mates from a payout he got after being brutally beaten. Following a bitter financial conflict in 2008 that resulted in two competing factions using the name, original member Ali Campbell wants you to know that only this UB40—with fellow OG players Astro and Mickey Virtue—can give you the genuine, feel-good UB40 live experience. I won’t harsh on them. Mom and I still love listening to them in the car. ANDREW HAMLIN

SEPTEMBER 16–19

FILM

62. Jurassic Park 25th Anniversary
Do we have to sell you on Jurassic Park, perhaps the greatest creature feature ever made? On that exuberant John Williams score? On eccentric Laura Dern, grumpy Sam Neill, and above all, shirtless Jeff Goldblum? <3

SEPTEMBER 17

FOOD & DRINK

63. Feast of St. Hildegard
Saint Hildegard of Bingen was many things: abbess, writer, composer, mystic, painter, herbalist, visionary, and polymath. (Recently, her extraordinary life provided fodder for author Nicola Griffith’s historical novel Hild.) Her writings also happen to contain the earliest known references to using hops in beer, which is reason enough for beer lovers to hoist a pint in her name. On her feast day (September 17), Ballard wood-fired pizzeria Delancey will host a sumptuous four-course supper in her honor, and Holy Mountain Brewing will supply the beer pairings—their mystical, esoteric ethos and hop-forward sensibility are just the right complement for a dinner in the spirit of Hildegard. JULIANNE BELL

READINGS & TALKS

64. John Kerry: Every Day Is Extra
Let’s be honest. Every day probably feels a little extra for John Kerry, who might qualify as the least "extra" man on the planet. When he ran for president in 2004, voters said they'd rather die from George W. Bush's warmongering than die from boredom under Kerry. They were dumb to think that way, but they weren't 100 percent wrong. In any event, the five-term senator from Massachusetts did turn out to be an incredibly effective secretary of state under President Barack Obama, and he had a front-row seat to some of the largest political and military disasters (and victories) in contemporary history. His memoir covers all of that, and, of course, serves as a "forceful testimony for the importance of diplomacy and American leadership," according to press materials. RICH SMITH

SEPTEMBER 18

MUSIC

65. Liz Phair, Speedy Ortiz
Like many restless suburban kids in the pre-streaming era, Liz Phair got her start through four-track recordings sent to fanzines. She quickly broke from the pack with wise-beyond-her-years lyrics in the Laurel Canyon vein combined with a sexual frankness and mastery of profanity rare among folk-based singer-songwriters. The success of the Girly-Sound tapes led to Exile in Guyville, which set the alt-rock world on fire. Major label recordings, TV theme songs, and other projects followed, but Exile is Phair's masterpiece. It was great then, it's great now, and it'll be great as long as polyester brides walk the earth. KATHY FENNESSY

66. O.A.R., Matt Nathanson
Jam rock lifers O.A.R. will bring their summer festival-ready tunes to a Sodo crowd with opening support from Matt Nathanson. Expect a lot of weed smoke and soft air guitar.

67. The Zombies, Liz Brasher
As long as core members Rod Argent (keyboards/vocals) and Colin Blunstone (vocals) are involved, a Zombies show is a can’t-miss, even half a century on from the group’s peak. After hundreds of listens, Odessey and Oracle still sounds like a paragon of poignant psychedelic pop, rendered in orchestral splendor and adorned with indelible melodies that are to cry for, sung in the honeyest of tones by the angelically melancholy Blunstone. DAVE SEGAL

SEPTEMBER 19

MUSIC

68. E-40
Godfather of the bass-heavy hyphy subgenere of rap and Bay Area legend E-40 (né Earl Stevens) has been in the game for decades and still puts on a better show than 98 percent of other rappers, making it his blood-bound duty to tear the roof down. Despite starting in the late 1980s, E-40 didn’t see a genuine national hit until 2006, when “Tell Me When to Go” introduced America to hyphy’s harmonic low-end stylings. More than a decade since then, Stevens has yet to score another big hit, but he still enjoys living-icon status in the rap scene while continuing to release in-demand mixtapes and oversee his son Droop-E’s career, alongside business investments that include stock in Microsoft. If you’ve never seen Earl Stevens in the flesh and love rap music, then do yourself a massive favor and go do it already. NICK ZURKO

69. Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, Cheap Trick
Iconic rock and roll queen Joan Jett and her band the Blackhearts will thrill you with Platinum hits like "Bad Reputation" and "I Hate Myself For Loving You." They'll be joined by '70s legends Cheap Trick (who will hopefully play "I Want You to Want Me").

SEPTEMBER 19-23

FASHION

70. Bellevue Fashion Week
See what fall fashion trends are in store at the Bellevue Collection's annual week of runway shows, beauty demos, fancy parties, and lots of shopping.

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 20

FESTIVALS

71. MEXAM Northwest Festival
Guys, despite what the President and Republicans say nearly every single day, Mexico is our friend! The U.S.'s longstanding, mutually beneficial, and rich relationship with our southern neighbors is so strong that it continues regardless of the current political climate. The monthlong MEX AM Festival, presented by the Consulate of Mexico, is here to celebrate all that. Watch contemporary and classic Mexican films, attend lectures about identity in contemporary Latinx art, catch up on the innovations emerging from Mexico's burgeoning tech sectors, and jam out to one of Mexico’s legendary rock bands, Café Tacvba. And, for the sake of a little friendly competition, don’t miss the three Mexican Wine-Offs, which pit Mexican wines against US wines in a competition sure to put a goofy wine smile on everyone's face. RICH SMITH

SEPTEMBER 20

COMEDY

72. Craig Ferguson: Hobo Fabulous Tour
The late-night show host will appear for some live jokes.

MUSIC

73. DeVotchKa, Orkesta Mendoza
Art-poppy four-piece DeVotchka have been tooling around Seattle for what seems like forever, and, as is sometimes the case with beloved local indie bands, they have landed a night at the Showbox. The acoustics of the hall should greatly benefit the soaring, emotive, and possibly overly earnest rock of DeVotchka, whose multi-instrumental proclivities and generally Slavic/Balkan bent should have been collecting royalties from Beirut for years now. (And Arcade Fire’s Win Butler could kick in, as well, given the moves he’s obviously been ripping from singer Nick Urata all these years.) KYLE FLECK

PERFORMANCE

74. Chinese Warriors of Peking
During the Ming Dynasty, two martial arts traditions compete in an acrobatic battle. Such is the narrative pretext for some astonishing visuals in Qui Jian's spectacular show.

75. Miss Coco Peru in 'The Taming of the Tension'
There's a lot of drag to see this fall, but you’d be remiss if you missed Miss Coco Peru’s visit to Seattle. Peru, the drag persona of Clinton Leupp, is an icon of contemporary American drag—up there with RuPaul and Lady Bunny and Magnolia Crawford. She reminds audiences that drag doesn’t need death drops and high kicks and billions of sequins to be entertaining. Good drag can be a solid joke and a funny face, and Miss Coco Peru has got at least one of each. CHASE BURNS

SEPTEMBER 20-21

MUSIC

76. The King Romeo Santos
Latin artist Romeo Santos, crowned many times over as the "King of Bachata," will play two nights of high energy tracks that have gone multi-platinum on his Golden Tour.

77. STRFKR
Joshua Hodges is the visionary leader of STRFKR, a Portland-based synth-pop band with light psychedelic and indie-rock tendencies. Their sound is driven by Hodges’s pleasant, sighing vocals, bright keys, pulsing and bumping bass, and beats with just enough groove appeal to make you want to dance—but not too hard, more like an easy, hip-shaking sway and slight shoulder shimmy. STRFKR dropped a fifth full-length in November, Being No One, Going Nowhere, and released another album, Vault Vol. 1, last February, the first of three that compile previously unreleased and rare tracks, including material composed well before their 2008 self-titled debut. LEILANI POLK

SEPTEMBER 20-22

COMEDY

78. Damon Wayans Jr.
Being the son of Damon Wayans and nephew to three uncles and an aunt who entertain folks for a living, Damon Wayans Jr. really can’t betray his DNA and familial pressure—or there would be merciless, hilarious ribbing to endure. Thankfully, the 35-year-old Wayans has succeeded as a TV and film actor, writer, and stand-up comedian. He admits that his humor is more obscure than his father’s and less enamored of discussing current events. Those into raunchy routines, though, will eat up Junior’s act. He does a bit about a pigeon and its bobbing head that will stay with you for a long time. DAVE SEGAL

SEPTEMBER 20-23

FESTIVALS

79. KremFest 2018
It’s not quite on the level of Decibel Festival for world-class electronic-music bookings, but KremFest is making strides to fill the void that that Seattle institution left. The event unites various local crews to create a strong demonstration of the city’s robust underground club culture. Detroit minimal-techno deity Robert Hood heads a strong bill that includes Swedish-American cosmic-techno artist Pleasurekraft, DJ/activist JD Samson (Le Tigre, MEN), house-music titan Doc Martin, Detroit techno renegade Sinistarr, Noncompliant, and more. DAVE SEGAL

SEPTEMBER 20-NOVEMBER 18

PERFORMANCE

80. The Witching Hour
Occultists gather in an esoteric library and conjure the monsters of Harm, Loneliness, Failure, Filth, and Chaos in this Halloween dinner show created by Terry Podgorski and Erin Brindley. They promise scares, beautiful design, and a touch of kitsch.

SEPTEMBER 21

FILM

81. 'Blaze' Opening
Ethan Hawke’s biopic of the Texan outlaw country singer Blaze Foley is based on his former wife Sybil Rosen’s memoir of their relationship, beginning with their hippie-love meeting in a church commune.

82. 'The House with a Clock in its Walls' Opening
Eli Roth of all people is adapting this 1973 gothic novel by John Bellairs about a good Michigan warlock (played by Jack Black), a hidden doomsday clock, and an evil widow. Will the crown prince of torture porn be able to capture the gloomy charm of Bellairs’s fantasy and Edward Gorey’s illustration? Cate Blanchett and Kyle MacLachlan are on hand to help out.

83. 'White Boy Rick' Opening
This crime drama is about Richard Wershe Jr.—a hustler who became an undercover FBI informant and then a drug kingpin before he was sentenced to life in prison for drug trafficking, all before he turned 16. It is getting a lot of hype because it’s based on outrageous, hard-to-believe true events (which happened in Detroit in the 1980s during the simultaneous crack epidemic and war on drugs), its youthful lead is a newcomer (Richie Merritt) with a similar socioeconomic background as the character he plays, and it has Matthew McConaughey doing his crazy-yet-caring blue-collar best (à la Dallas Buyers Club and True Detective) as the teen’s dad. LEILANI POLK

MUSIC

84. Ben Howard
On this tour stop, English singer/songwriter Ben Howard will play songs from his self-produced album Noonday Dream—his first since his debut 2014 album, I Forget Where We Were.

85. Johnny Marr, The Belle Game
Full of supple, surging chimes and jangles, Johnny Marr’s guitar buoyed one of the most iconic rock groups of the ’80s. His instrument had to compete with one of rock’s most distinctive and provocative voices in the Smiths, and it did all right for itself. In the ’90s, it also buttressed one of rock’s blandest voices in Electronic, and it did all right for itself there, too. He’s also added six-string glamour to Modest Mouse, the Pretenders, and the The, among others. Marr’s adaptability and dynamic playing style have enabled him to stay busy after his commercial heyday. As a solo artist, he’s released four albums, including Playland, which have a journeyman quality about them—except for the adrenalized title track. While his songwriting is attractive enough in a tried-and-true Brit-rock manner, Marr’s singing is anono-bloke-ish. His recent releases convey a big, pro-studio sound and songs that exist because Johnny Marr can’t not make music, but it’s hard to get very excited by them. DAVE SEGAL

86. Macklemore
A young Ben Haggerty’s greatest triumphs once came in the form of thoughtful social observations and personal conscience mining. More recently, a veteran Macklemore has struggled to find a side of himself he hasn’t explored yet on record, having already written definitive statements on many of the social justice and personal issues that concern him. Between anthem-chasing and extolling the joys of fatherhood on his latest album, Gemini, Seattle’s most famous rapper lands a hit with the Offset-featuring, horn-blasted “Willy Wonka.” Moments like these are sparse, but a good moment is a good moment, and it should fortify his Billboard-chart-hit-parade set nicely. TODD HAMM

READINGS & TALKS

87. DeRay Mckesson: On the Other Side of Freedom
Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson wears a blue vest, maintains an impeccably trimmed goatee, hosts Pod Save the People, and spearheads Campaign Zero, an organization devoted to ending police brutality through legislative means. He's touring the country with a new book about his experiences "at the front lines" of the BLM movement. RICH SMITH

SEPTEMBER 21-22

MUSIC

88. John Coltrane Birthday Celebration Weekend
On September 23, 1926, one of the greatest American musicians to ever live was born in a small town in North Carolina. His greatness was not discovered until well over half of his short life, 40 years, was completed. He died of a bad liver in 1967. But his last decade in this world was simply out of this world. In this short period of time, he contributed to one of the greatest American cultural achievements, Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue, and, with the John Coltrane Quartet, made his own American masterpiece, A Love Supreme. His late works were very difficult, but deeply important to him, in much the same way that the almost unreadable novel Finnegans Wake meant a lot to its author, James Joyce. On this night, local jazz musicians—Ben Shapiro, Matt Jorgensen, Marc Seales, and Charles Owens—honor the birth of the jazz giant. CHARLES MUDEDE

SEPTEMBER 21-23

FESTIVALS

89. Fremont Oktoberfest
Raise a (gigantic, oversized) stein to Seattle's biggest fall beer festival, which has been running for 21 years and features over 80 craft beers.

90. Kirkland Oktoberfest
Imbibe your fill of German bier, witness the running of the wiener dogs, play "human foosball," and much more.

SEPTEMBER 21-29

FILM

91. Local Sightings Film Festival
What is this city becoming? What have we lost in the rush and thrust of all these new developments? To whom does this growing city belong? The brilliant Local Sightings film festival will show films that reveal the answers to these questions, through features, shorts, and animation that are born here or hereabouts. There's much to see and much to talk about. CHARLES MUDEDE

PERFORMANCE

92. Jerome Robbins Festival
If you've ever lunged around your living room snapping your fingers like a Shark or a Jet, or if you've ever shimmied around like a rich man (ya ba dibba dibba dibba dibba dibba dibba dum), then you've danced Jerome Robbins's choreography. This extra special festival celebrates his cinematic work as well as his lesser known stuff, including Circus Polka, with music by Igor Stravinsky; In the Night, with a Chopin score; Afternoon of a Faun, to Debussy's classic; and three other dances. Robbins coached PNB artistic director Peter Boal for years. It'll be exciting to see how the student interprets the work of the master. RICH SMITH

SEPTEMBER 21-OCTOBER 14

ART

93. Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel
This traveling exhibition is a full-scale reproduction of one of the most monumental artistic achievements of the Western world. Unlike the original, this one's available to see up-close. Admission lasts for an hour and a half.

SEPTEMBER 21-NOVEMBER 3

HALLOWEEN

94. Georgetown Morgue
Starting with spooky flashlight fright nights, this annual haunted village of doom hosts scares all throughout autumn.

SEPTEMBER 22

ART

95. CoCA Sanctuary Auction
See participants raise money for contemporary art at this marathon of art-making (you can catch up with them in the evening at the party).

COMEDY

96. Gabriel "Fluffy" Iglesias
Mega-successful stand-up comedian, actor, and Volkswagen minibus collector Iglesias will deliver some family-friendly laughs.

FESTIVALS

97. Luminata
The Fremont Arts Council will once again celebrate the autumnal equinox with a luminous parade filled with lanterns, glowing umbrellas, and incandescent costumes.

MUSIC

98. Flogging Molly & Dropkick Murphys
For the past two-plus decades, Flogging Molly have been waving the flag of Celtic punk proudly, touring the world and providing thousands of devoted fans with a night of drunken, sweaty, sing-alongs. The seven-piece LA-based band is truly a spectacle, as they play a wide range of instruments, including the bodhran, mandolin, accordion, banjo, and tin whistle. KEVIN DIERS

99. Keith Sweat
Anyone who had sex in the '90s owes their good fortune to the slick R&B of easy listening (and platinum-selling) legend Keith Sweat.

100. Marisela En Concierto
Mexican American pop star Marisela, alternately known as the "Latin Madonna," will return to the States for a racy night of decades' worth of chart-topping hits.

READINGS & TALKS

101. Frank Abe, Shawn Wong, Stephen Sumida, and Tom Ikeda
Asian American intellectuals, including biographer Frank Abe, will gather to commemorate John Okada, the author of the classic No-No Boy. This was Okada's only novel; it was spurned upon publication in 1957 for its anti-war message and treatment of Japanese internment in the 1940s. Editor Abe and contributors Shawn Wong and Stephen Sumida will be joined by moderator Tom Ikeda of Densho at the launch of John Okada: The Life & Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy.

102. Grand Reopening Celebration
Rejoice! Hugo House will at last unveil its new home, much more spacious and cranny-filled than the former monastery where it's been hunkered for the past few years. Eminent (but friendly!) locals like Anastacia-Renee, Quenton Baker, and Nicole Hardy along with Hugo House writers-in-residence Kristen Millares Young and Amber Flame will read aloud, and the Bushwick Book Club will perform book-inspired music. Stay on for a party with KEXP's DJ Gabriel Teodros.

SPORTS & RECREATION

103. Snohomish Tweed Ride
Fancy a leisurely countryside jaunt on your bicycle? Make use of any Victorian, Edwardian, or steampunk-ian outfits you may own and toddle along Snohomish's Centennial Trail, stopping for tea (which they'll provide) and a picnic (which you'll bring yourself). There will also be posh sporting opportunities like croquet and badminton, a costume contest, and more.

SEPTEMBER 22-23

FILM

104. The Internet Cat Video Festival
A three-day celebration of the internet's greatest (and arguably only) contribution to the cultural life of this planet: short clips of humankind's second-cutest pets being cute as hail. Trainspotters will take note that this event is held at the same venue that has hosted The Stranger's own HUMP!, another festival founded on the premise that people will not only pay for what they can get for free online, they will stand in line in the rain for the privilege of doing it together! Meee-ow. SEAN NELSON

SPORTS & RECREATION

105. Tough Mudder
Experience steep-sided gravel pits, deep-wood runs, a century-old coal heap, and black coal mud at this annual run and obstacle course.

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 23

FESTIVALS

106. Washington State Fair
If you've read Charlotte's Web or live anywhere in the United States, you're familiar with the essential components of a state fair: Baby animals, delightfully greasy carnival food, rides, and talent exhibits in categories ranging from baking to vegetable growing. Puyallup's decades-old, 20-day Washington State Fair, which kicks off over Labor Day weekend, promises all that and more, claiming to be one of the biggest fairs of its kind in the country. This year, concert headliners include Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, Cheap Trick (Wed Sept 19), Macklemore (Fri Sept 21), and Rascal Flatts (Sun Sept 23), among other big names.

SEPTEMBER 23

ART

107. Fall for Zines!
The ever-ambitious Kate Berwanger (who runs Swerve Zine Library and Assembly Literary Open Mic) will host this festival of comics and zines, complete with vendors, a DJ, a raffle, and more. Go if you love indie illustration and creation.

FOOD & DRINK

108. An Incredible Feast
At this fundraiser feast, “where the farmers are the stars,” more than 15 acclaimed Seattle chefs will be matched up with local farms to create a locally sourced spread. This year’s batch of culinary luminaries includes Autumn Martin of Hot Cakes, Cam Hanin of Ma’ono, Matthew Lewis of Where Ya at Matt, Michael Whisenhunt of Central Smoke, Tamara Murphy of Terra Plata, and more, and they’ll be whipping up dishes using fresh ingredients from Alvarez Organic Farm and Nash’s Organic Produce, among others. Plus, there’s local beer and wine, live music, carnival games, and a silent auction. Proceeds benefit the Center for Urban Horticulture. JULIANNE BELL

MUSIC

109. Parquet Courts, Gong Gong Gong
Parquet Courts are New Yorkers skitching behind their own taxi of dented post-punk. They take you from a sloucher-punk point A to an art-rock point B. Still lit up with gold from their 2017 album Milano, produced by Daniele Luppi and featuring Karen O’s sultry self, the band is already working to crank out another album, yet more back-to-raw origins this time around. Though anyone who has seen their stage-diving shows knows their nerves haven’t gotten too far away from them. ZACH FRIMMEL

110. Rascal Flatts, Trent Harmon
Wildly popular Ohio country band Rascal Flatts will keep on twanging on this tour stop for their 10th album. Trent Harmon will give an opening set.

SPORTS & RECREATION

111. Seattle Seahawks vs. Dallas Cowboys
The Seahawks will play the Dallas Cowboys for their first official home game of the season.

PERFORMANCE

112. RuPaul's Drag Race: Werq The World
Did someone say Shangela is coming to town? Shangela is coming to town!! The queen who was robbed—robbed!—on season three of All Stars brings her amazing talent to Seattle, along with some other hags named Violet Chachki, Valentina, and Kim Chi. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

SEPTEMBER 24

MUSIC

113. Donny McCaslin with Kneebody
You could pour everything I know about jazz into an airplane-size liquor bottle and still have room for enough bourbon to get a buzz going. And yet even my ignorant ass knows enough to know that Donny McCaslin coming to Seattle is an event. McCaslin and company were handpicked by David Bowie to help him create the sound of his triumphant final album, Blackstar—the majesty of which continues to deepen with age. And lest it seem gauche not to let more than two sentences of a McCaslin preview go by without mentioning the late great Mr. Jones, the band seems to have no qualms about embracing the association—their most recent album, Beyond Now, was dedicated to and inspired by Bowie. SEAN NELSON

114. Rise Against, AFI, Anti-Flag
Throw your body around to thrash-rock and hardcore punk tracks from Rise Against, AFI, and Anti-Flag on their 2018 Mourning in Amerika Tour.

SEPTEMBER 25

MUSIC

115. Chelsea Wolfe, Russian Circles
Nordic Europe can flip between stark, icy terrain and lush, forested paradise in a matter of miles, and Nordic underworld queen Chelsea Wolfe's music mirrors that dichotomy with the soft, spectral quality of her voice, leading you like a beacon through a pulsating drudge into the hinterlands. An innate sense of controlled chaos and independence through isolation manifests heavily in her work, which utilizes classic wall-of-sound techniques to expand newer explorations of ambient, drone, and doom metal, all of which is sewn together by Norwegian folk music’s mysticism. KIM SELLING

116. Denzel Curry
Carol City, Florida, rapper Denzel Curry has been touring like a maniac as of late (this is his fifth trip through town in the last two years), but it’d be misguided to say he’s flooding the market. Curry’s amped style makes tracks from 2016’s Imperial beg to be heard live, and going ham in a room full of revelers might be the most authentic DC experience you can get. In addition, he’s a profound societal reporter on the mic, and a couple of his recent deep cuts actually play with a slightly West Coast stoner sound, both of which should make a room full of blunt-chugging West Coasters even happier. TODD HAMM

117. Japanese Breakfast, Ought
Michelle Zauner’s recently released album as Japanese Breakfast, Soft Sounds from Another Planet, is another wonderfully discordant trip from the Eugene native. Originally conceptualized as a science-fiction musical, the album is built around the sprouts of an imaginative extraterrestrial environment, but the mixture of unmistakably terrestrial influence (“Jimmy Fallon Big!” “Till Death”) suggests a curious narrator on the ground looking up. Softer and more upbeat in many ways than JB’s 2016 debut, Psychopomp, Soft Sounds still ties together blunt sexuality, humor, and lament with beautifully sung melodies like only Zauner can. TODD HAMM

READINGS & TALKS

118. Kazu Kibuishi: Super Nova
Kazu Kibuishi, the man who illustrated the Harry Potter 15th anniversary covers, will present the latest in his bestselling graphic novel series Amulet.

119. Shane Bauer: The Business of Prisons and Punishment
Shane Bauer was one of three Americans captured and held hostage in Iran while hiking near the Iraq-Iran border in 2009. After two years, Bauer was released, only to return to the United States and enter a whole different kind of prison system—this time, as a reporter. In 2014, Bauer got a job as an entry-level guard at a private prison in Winnfield, Louisiana, an experience he documented in a National Magazine Award–winning exposé published by Mother Jones in 2016. That article was expanded into a book, The Business of Prisons and Punishment, and Bauer will read excerpts and discuss this devastating indictment of America’s prison system during his Town Hall talk. KATIE HERZOG

SEPTEMBER 26

MUSIC

120. Bob Moses, Mansionair
It turns out that Bob Moses is not the jazz drummer who kept time with luminaries like Larry Coryell, Gary Burton, Jack DeJohnette's Compost, and Tisziji Muñoz, but rather a young Canadian electronic duo. You'd think these cats would be SEO-savvy enough not to nick the name of a respected musical figure. Anyway, maple-leaf Bob Moses create "Music that will make you want to build a highway through a low-income neighborhood," according to their SoundCloud bio. Funny, but it's more accurate to say that Bob Moses won't wreck your 'hood's integrity as much as they'll set a sultry, smooth mood for you and your significant other to create erotic friction. Tom Howie and Jimmy Vallance's understated croons glide over slow- and mid-tempo house rhythms in a manner that should please fans of Matthew Dear and Junior Boys. DAVE SEGAL

SEPTEMBER 26-27

MUSIC

121. Chief Keef
Legendary Chicago outlaw Chief Keef has left his grandma's basement and rocketed to the top of the hiphop charts in recent years. He'll perform a two-night set of his hits, including "I Don't Like," "Love Sosa," "Faneto," and more.

PERFORMANCE

122. My Brother, My Brother and Me / The Adventure Zone
The three McElroys—Justin, Travis, and Griffin—will take their two podcasts to the theater. On the 26th, they'll do a live taping of their MBMBaM advice podcast, where they'll hopefully conduct another Haunted Doll Watch, and on the 27th, they'll take on another comedic Dungeons & Dragons adventure in The Adventure Zone.

READINGS & TALKS

123. Erin Gibson: Feminasty / Throwing Shade Live 2018: There's No Place Like Condo Tour
Erin Gibson, the snarky co-host of the Throwing Shade podcast, declares her vision of "a utopian future where women are recognized as humans." She'll come to town on the 26th with Feminasty, named after her honorific on the podcast, a collection of essays about the unnecessary burdens placed on women in the workplace and elsewhere. Then, on the 27th, she'll join with Bryan Safi for a live taping of the rollicking political and pop culture podcast, complete with "Singing! Dancing! Guests! Games! Clowns!"

SEPTEMBER 27

FILM

124. Far Out
REI presents a ski and snowboard film screening with a party and guest athlete experiences (at the late show).

125. Night Heat: The 41st Film Noir Series
They proliferated in anxious postwar America and still occasionally return to brood and smolder onscreen: films noirs, born of the chiaroscuro influence of immigrant German directors and the pressure of unique American fears. Once again, SAM will screen nine hard-boiled, moody crime classics like White Heat, Force of Evil, Sudden Fear, and one of the most fascinating films of the 1950s, Night of the Hunter.

READINGS & TALKS

126. Arjun Singh Sethi: American Hate
In American Hate: Survivors Speak Out, this activist/lawyer/Georgetown professor gathers stories of those who have been bullied, discriminated against, and physically hurt by racists, xenophobes, anti-queers, and other bigots in post-2016 America. As Reza Aslan writes, "It’s one thing to talk about the sudden rise of hate in Trump’s America. It’s something else to read the stories of those whose lives have been affected by hate, and, in some cases, devastated by it."

127. The Lalas
The Lalas of LA, seen in Justin Timberlake videos and at the Emmys, promise a sexy, interactive, comedic show.

SEPTEMBER 7-OCTOBER 4

FILM

128. French Cinema Now
This annual mini-festival celebrating new French and Francophone movies, presented by SIFF, is one of Seattle’s best film festivals.

SEPTEMBER 28

FILM

129. Night School
Kevin Hart tries to earn his GED so he can become a stockbroker. Tiffany Haddish as his teacher is determined to whip him into shape.

MUSIC

130. Miguel, dvsn, Nonchalant Savant
Miguel is a truly smooth R&B thriller, with pop smarts, massive genre-crossover abilities, and a contagious kinetic sexual energy. His fourth studio album, War & Leisure, was dropped late last year, and will be in high demand during this set of his 2018 Ascension Tour. KIM SELLING

READINGS & TALKS

131. Hugo Literary Series: Jim Shepard, Cedar Sigo, Sabina Murray, and Anhayla
Hugo Literary Series will kick off a new season in the writing center's new home with an evening of music, poetry, and prose inspired by books. You'll hear from fiction writers Jim Shepard and Sabina Murray, PNW poet Cedar Sigo, and musician Anhayla, all riffing on the theme "Brave New World."

132. Jose Antonio Vargas: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen
Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas comes to Town Hall's Inside/Out series with his new memoir Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen. Vargas has been writing and speaking with authority on the plight and power of undocumented immigrants for several years now, and his work continues to be an invaluable resource for those who want this country to live up to its Dream. The memoir covers his own experience with immigration and detention, challenging our default understandings of "home." RICH SMITH

SEPTEMBER 28-30

PERFORMANCE

133. Against the Grain/Men in Dance
Men dancers on the highest levels of artistry will enliven modern, contemporary, urban, jazz, and ballet genres. The attractions will include Alex Ketley's new piece for five Seattle men, a work by Cameron McKinney, the LA-based company VERSA-STYLE, and locals like Marie Chong, Gerard Theoret, Deb Wolf, and Spectrum's Donald Byrd.

SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 7

FILM

134. Tasveer South Asian Film Festival
This year, the 13-years-running, 10-day festival will focus on Pakistani film, with the theme of #KnowMe. Always relevant and on the artistic vanguard, Tasveer's biggest annual event does its best to dispel myths about South Asian countries.

SEPTEMBER 29

ART

135. Infamous Kitsap Ferry Riot Party
On an October morning in 1987, I woke up to my mom yelling at my older brother and shaking the newspaper at him. “Rock fans riot on ferry” screamed the headline. To this day, I have no idea if Andy really was asleep in his friend’s car like he told our mom or was “rioting” along with everyone else on their return trip to Seattle from a GBH show in Bremerton. While I’d only ever thought of this as a bit of family lore, the event has gone down as a critical moment in Seattle music history. This all-ages event celebrates the 31st anniversary of that night with a film screening of David Larew's Voices in the Dark, a sneak peek of The Infamous Kitsap Ferry Riot film, and music by Howling Gods and Toecutter. KATIE KURTZ

FOOD & DRINK

136. Fresh Hop Ale Festival
At this event, all of the ales are made with hops that were picked in Yakima Valley (which produces 75 percent of the United States' hop crop) no more than 24 hours before brewing. Proceeds benefit Yakima County-based arts and science organizations.

MUSIC

137. Bad Religion, Pennywise, Reel Big Fish, Less Than Jake, The Interrupters, Mad Caddies
If you love skanking while boozed up, then head to Auburn for live sets from punk and ska groups Bad Religion, Pennywise, Reel Big Fish, Less Than Jake, The Interrupters, and Mad Caddies set among selections of craft beers to taste and plenty of purchasing options.

138. Childish Gambino, Rae Sremmurd
Heavily acclaimed, multi-talented hiphop artist, actor, and producer Donald Glover, a.k.a. Childish Gambino, will play a set in Seattle on his North American tour with support from Rae Sremmurd.

139. Chvrches
Chvrches sound like the ending credits to a bittersweet indie-teen movie. I imagine the quirky main character going through dramatic, slice-of-life highs and lows, coming of age, and learning difficult lessons, only to emerge at the end stronger, altered, and with a better understanding of life and love. Maybe the ending is a little ambiguous, but now the skies are clear and she's ready to take on the world. And then the screen flashes to black and the Glasgow electro-pop band starts to play. Frontwoman Lauren Mayberry's clear songbird voice delivers astutely emotional lyrics over sweeping, epic synths that simultaneously make your heart soar and ache. This is music for growing up, and for feeling feelings while you dance. ROBIN EDWARDS

140. Garbage, Rituals of Mine
I interviewed Shirley Manson in 2015, and she said she can still kill a party completely by walking into it. (I’m still struggling to believe it.) She also said that their latest album had four possible titles. I don’t know who came up with the title Strange Little Birds, but it’s apparently the band’s nickname for weird fan letters. Aside from the pro forma single “Empty,” much of the album comes off a bit less sounds-in-a-vacuum and a bit more desperate, a bit more hesitant about actually interacting with the world. Just a bit. It’s not like the signature sound’s gone. But that surface slickness sounds worn away in places, like a perimeter breached, honest strong emotions deciding on fight and/or flight. ANDREW HAMLIN

141. Journey, Def Leppard
Everpresent torch-holders of the '80s, Journey and Def Leppard, bring their light-rock-less-talk vibes to the Columbia River for a night of hair-swinging and piano solos reminiscent of Steve Perry's golden years.

142. Mudhoney, The Scientists, Tom Price Desert Classic
It doesn’t matter that Mudhoney’s last album, Vanishing Point, came out five years ago. It doesn’t matter if they do new material tonight from whatever forthcoming LP they’re working on, or not. By this point, these gr*nge godfathers are a proverbial well-oiled machine designed to provoke fist-pumps and moshing among teens and those approaching retirement age. With unerring consistency over the last 28 years, Mudhoney have ground out cantankerous cacophony and spewed caustic lyrical snark (and the occasional tender sentiment; see especially “If I Think”) that has aged as well as their two garage-psych-connoisseur guitarists, Mark Arm and Steve Turner. Even in 2018, Mudhoney remain a vital live proposition; they are veritable rock-and-roll Dorian Grays. DAVE SEGAL

143. REZZ
Young DJ and producer REZZ from Niagara Falls will regale you with a set of heavy underground minimalist techno and dark, spooky industrial cuts. They'll be joined by additional guests as a part of their Certain Kind of Magic Tour.

READINGS & TALKS

144. Juan Williams: Trump's War on Civil Rights
During this Town Hall event, analyst Juan Williams will set out to answer Donald Trump's notorious rhetorical question, addressed to African American voters: “What the hell do you have to lose?” His book, aptly titled What the Hell Do You Have to Lose?: Trump’s War on Civil Rights, tracks Trump's assaults on civil rights, as well as telling the stories of 1960s-era civil rights activists.

SEPTEMBER 29-30

FESTIVALS

145. Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival
Geek out over the history, craft, and culture of wooden boats of all shapes and sizes at this annual festival. You'll get to climb aboard classic and modern vessels, tour Lake Union on a historic fleet, shop from maritime vendors, sip beer in a garden, and more. They promise that "everything is fun, and most things are free."

146. Northwest Tea Festival
This two-day festival dedicated to the cozy and culturally rich beverage promises to cover all aspects of tea, from "cultural to the historical and the sensory to the scientific."

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30

ART

147. Bellwether 2018
We keep writing about the mischievous, Stranger Genius Award–winning artist trio SuttonBeresCuller for a simple reason: They’re a lot of fun. Over the years, John Sutton, Ben Beres, and Zac Culler have caused stirs by floating around on an artificial island in Lake Washington and creating a joystick-controlled painting viewer module, among other installations and happenings. The trio has curated this year’s annual Northwest arts festival in Bellevue, with exhibitions, installations, and events spreading from the epicenter of the museum to various areas around the city. They’ll showcase rising Pacific Northwest sculptors in a special pop-up gallery, host performances, and no doubt highlight the creativity and architectural excitement to be found east of Lake Washington. JOULE ZELMAN

148. MUSE: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête
Earlier this year, Mickalene Thomas's bright, brilliant portraits of black women in dazzling interior spaces graced the walls of Seattle Art Museum as part of Figuring History, a multigenerational group show that placed her in a lineage of monumental painters that also includes Robert Colescott and Kerry James Marshall. While most of Thomas's works begin with photographic sources, MUSE is the first exhibition devoted to considering her photographs as finished works in themselves. As the title suggests, this show revolves around the inspiring women who compose Thomas's community. Curated by Thomas, tête-à-tête is an accompanying exhibition of photographs by artists who further inspire her. EMILY POTHAST

PERFORMANCE

149. Femme Fatale
A Prom Queen and Can Can collab!? Yes, please! The Can Can culinary cabaret, which serves up some of the best butts and beignets in town, is partnering with rising music star Prom Queen for their summer show, and it's a safe bet that it will be a hit. That said, the team could have chosen a better subject than Mata Hari, who catapulted to fame using an outsider's vision of Indonesia. Hopefully their adaptation will avoid Hari's pitfalls by doing more than just simply reproducing the Dutch dancer's problematic early-20th-century Orientalist style. Otherwise, this will be a spectacular shitshow. CHASE BURNS

SEPTEMBER 30

MUSIC

150. Jeff Tweedy, James Elkington
The gently likable Jeff Tweedy is the former singer for '80s alt-country outfit Uncle Tupelo, the current/past singer for Wilco, and one of the more celebrated songwriters in music today. For this solo tour, he'll be juggling favored tracks from his past as well as songs from his latest solo acoustic record, Together At Last.