Behold the light-art talents of an award-winning luminary at the opening reception for Maja Petrić: We Are All Made of Light. MadArt via Facebook
Our music critics have already chosen the 33 best music shows this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn. Here are their picks in every genre—from a reading with Pulitzer Prize-winning wordsmith Alice Walker to "America's largest festival of beef," Cowabunga, and from the Orcas Island Film Festival to an exhibition from award-winning local poet Quenton Baker. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

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Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Jessica Hopper: Night Moves
Music critic Jessica Hopper has built a rep for incisive analysis and reporting on both music and the sociopolitical issues that orbit it as an editor for Pitchfork and Rookie, as well as a contributor to Chicago Reader and other respected publications. Following her 2015 book, The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic, Hopper is touring behind a new memoir, Night Moves. It’s a compendium of diary entries depicting with poetic, emotional depth what it was like to be a feminist music enthusiast and Windy City devotee in one of America’s greatest cultural metropolises during the pre-gentrification ’00s. DAVE SEGAL

Sally Field: In Pieces
You like her. You really like her! So do I. The famous actress (Forrest Gump, Mrs. Doubtfire) reads from her autobiography, In Pieces. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

Seattle Arts & Lectures: Doris Kearns Goodwin
A titan of presidential biography, this historian wrote the proverbial books on Franklin D. Roosevelt (No Ordinary Time), Abraham Lincoln (Team of Rivals), and Theodore Roosevelt (The Bully Pulpit). The Pulitzer winner will visit with her latest chunky tome, Leadership in Turbulent Times, which delves into the lives and accomplishments of Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson.

MONDAY-THURSDAY

FILM

French Cinema Now
For one week, Seattle turns into a center for French and Francophone cinema culture, offering some of the best movies you'll see all year. The opening film, Return of the Hero, stars Jean Dujardin in a Napoleon-era comedy of errors. For those desiring grittier fare, Modi Barry and Cédric Ido's Château follows an ambitious street hustler in east Paris, while Mahamat-Saleh Haroun's A Season in France addresses the hard choices facing asylum-seekers. If you just crave some of that continental wit, try Place Publique or Just To Be Sure, but don't be afraid to get weird with When Margaux Meets Margaux or All You Can Eat Buddha. JOULE ZELMAN

MONDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

A Small History of Amal, Age 7
In A Small History of Amal, Age 7, a little Indian boy fights the god of death shortly after the Mumbai train bombings in 2006. Nabilah S. Ahmed plays the title role in this one, and she’s delivered standout performances in everything I’ve ever seen her in. RICH SMITH
No performance on Tuesday

Prelude to a Kiss
This play by Craig Lucas is about a woman who may or may not have switched bodies with a sick octogenarian during her honeymoon, and her husband who gradually comes to realize that his beautiful young wife is harboring the soul of an old man. Lucas's work has been seen as an allegory for AIDS; it was nominated for the 1990 Tony Award and the Pulitzer Prize. The cast includes MJ Sieber, Anastasia Higham, and Galen Joseph.
No performance on Tuesday or Wednesday

MONDAY-SUNDAY

ART

National Geographic Photo Ark
Photo Ark is a 25-year-long project of National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore to document every endangered species in human captivity. These portraits of singular animals against black or gray backdrops and outside their native habitats puts the focus on their beauty, power, and strangeness. “I want people to care, to fall in love, and to take action,” the photographer has said of the series. With 16,306 species currently endangered and threatened with extinction according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, now, more than ever, it’s time to look into these animals’ eyes and figure out what we can do for them. KATIE KURTZ
Closing Sunday

This Is Our Home, Where We Belong
Diné/Twana curator and contributor Denise Emerson has chosen four fellow Coast Salish women artists to elaborate expressions of "environmental justice, identity, and place": Caroline Edwards (Swinomish), Karen Engel (Shoalwater Bay), Kimberly Miller (Skokomish), and Abbey Pierson (Cowlitz). It's a great opportunity to remind yourself of indigenous peoples' connection to their homeland and resistance to ethnic cleansing. This is part of the yəhaw̓ art project partnership with the Seattle Public Library.
Opening Monday; opening reception Saturday

FILM

Tasveer South Asian Film Festival
This year, the 13-years-running, 10-day festival will focus on Pakistani film, with the theme of #KnowMe. Always relevant and on the artistic vanguard, Tasveer's biggest annual event does its best to dispel myths about South Asian countries.

PERFORMANCE

Everything You Touch
The New York Times calls Sheila Callaghan's play Everything You Touch "volatile," "histrionic," "florid and highly flammable." In other words, it's perfect theatrical fodder for Washington Ensemble Theatre. The story, to the extent that there is a story, involves a depressed young woman named Jess and her possibly imaginary friend/lover/father/fashion-designer, Victor. Themes of body-image issues and alienation bind the whole thing together. You're going because Kiki Abba is one of the best comedic actors in town, and she's playing the lead role. Maggie Rogers directs. RICH SMITH
No performance on Tuesday or Wednesday

TUESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Feast at the Market
At this progressive dinner, more than 20 participating Pike Place Market restaurants—including the Pink Door, Il Bistro, Matt's in the Market, Cafe Campagne, Radiator Whiskey, and more—will create special dishes, and you’ll get to traipse through the market eating them at your leisure in whatever order you wish. Proceeds will benefit Neighborcare Health, which provides health care to the homeless and uninsured. JULIANNE BELL

READINGS & TALKS

Ronan Farrow
A tireless exposer of sexual abuse, journalist Ronan Farrow has won the Pulitzer Prize, served in the State Department, and authored War on Peace: The End of Diplomacy and the Decline of American Influence. Here's your chance to hear him talk about reporting and misinformation as part of the UW lecture series on "Bunk."

What Is at Stake for Washington's Native Nations Today
Learn what challenges Native folks face today in terms of sovereignty, land rights, and urban planning. UW professors Jean Dennison (Osage) and Josh Reid (Snohomish) will interview Lisa Wilson and Melvinjohn Ashue, two local Native leaders.

TUESDAY-FRIDAY

ART

Elisheba Johnson: You Wouldn't Have This Problem If You Lost Weight
In a recent exhibition at Juan Alonso’s Tashiro Kaplan Building studio, Elisheba Johnson—who KUOW has called an “artist you should know”—showed a series of paintings in which she had transcribed the details and images from local rental listings onto vintage pillowcases. Inspired by the process of hunting for a new apartment, Johnson’s tender, intimate mixed-media works reveal just how expensive Seattle’s real-estate market has become, and why affordable housing is increasingly unattainable for many. For her latest exhibit at Virago Gallery, Johnson is responding to how “society tells women from birth that their body is not their own.” EMILY POTHAST
Closing Friday

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Wild World of Wrestling
Artists pay tribute to the extravagant realm of pro-wrestling. See work by John Black, Ryan Berkley, Jesse Danger Dyer, Enntrails, Rhodora Jacob, Nick Gucker, Henry, Heather Lambert, Khalil Justice Linane, George Long, Angelita Martinez, Jason Middelton, Cody Shipman, Dusty Winter, and Eli Wolff.
Closing Sunday

WEDNESDAY

FILM

Schlock and Awe: Reagan-Era Horror
Deregulation and out-of-control greed were not the only horrors of the Reagan reign. The Forum celebrates slashers, mutants, and gore in a deep dive into the paranoia and excess of the era, and boy does that sound like a fun escape from our own hellscape. Tonight's film is the somber haunted house story The Changeling.

FOOD & DRINK

Author Talk: Rose's Baking Basics with Rose Levy Beranbaum
Renowned baking expert Rose Levy Beranbaum will share her knowledge, discuss her new book on the essentials of baking, and sign copies purchased onsite. Plus, guests will get to taste a recipe from the book.

READINGS & TALKS

Arne Duncan: How Schools Work
President Obama's Secretary of Education confronts the crisis in public education in his book How Schools Work. In this Town Hall talk, he'll explain where we fall behind and why, and what we can do to give students the education they deserve.

Word Works: Sarah Manguso
The writer of brilliant, uncategorizable, brutal books like The Guardians and Two Kinds of Decay—written concisely and in fragments, a form almost at odds with the work’s steeliness and poignancy—is also hilarious on the subject of the last paragraph of The Great Gatsby. Ask her about it. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Katrina Haffner: New Work
Arts journalist and artist Haffner will show work reflecting on the cycles of life and death in nature, often employing black backgrounds and photorealistic creatures.
Closing Sunday

PERFORMANCE

Cirque du Soleil: VOLTA
Every Cirque du Soleil show I’ve experienced has abounded with breathtaking, eye-popping visuals as well as awe-inspiring feats of movement by Cirque’s cast of dancers, physical actors, athletes, and circus performers (acrobats, contortionists, aerialists, and the like), all within a big tent. The subject matter of VOLTA, Cirque’s 41st production, involves extreme sports, touching on (but not limited to) shape diving, BMX, and rope skipping. One fan said it was “absolutely spectacular," so don't miss this Marymoor Park run. LEILANI POLK

Richard III
Last year, the crew of upstart crow collective produced an all-female adaptation of Shakespeare's Henry VI that was so good, it actually made people want to see a production of Henry VI. I reckon they'll have the same luck with this classic tale of throne-hungry villainy. Top-notch veteran actor Sarah Hartlett will take on the title role. RICH SMITH

THURSDAY

ART

Pioneer Square Art Walk
Once a month, Seattleites flock to the streets in Pioneer Square for a chance to stroll, sip on booze, and attend as many art openings as possible at First Thursday. It's the city's central and oldest art walk, and takes place in a historic neighborhood known for its abundance of galleries. Wine and hobnobbing will steal the scene for some, but at its core, it's an impressive communal unveiling of new artwork. In October, check out opening receptions for Haein Kang: Illusion, Jenny Schmid: Wildness Lost, Ken Barnes: oYo, and Preston Singletary: Raven's Treasures. Plus, find affordable art at 100 under $100 and vote on a new City Arts feature at City Arts and Blue Moon Present: The 2018 Fall Art Walk Awards.

FILM

Night Heat: The 41st Film Noir Series
They proliferated in anxious postwar America and still occasionally return to brood and smolder onscreen: films noirs, born of the chiaroscuro influence of immigrant German directors and the pressure of unique American fears. Once again, the museum will screen nine hard-boiled, moody crime classics like tonight's Leave Her to Heaven.

FOOD & DRINK

Brew at the Zoo
Sample imports, domestics, microbrews, and ciders from 56 different breweries in the Rain Forest Pavilion and Zoomazium to support the Woodland Park Zoo's conservation efforts.

Farm House Dinners
Chef Micah Mowreym has previously spent time at some of the world's top-rated, Michelin-starred restaurants, like Mirazur in France, Osteria Francescana in Italy, and the beloved Gramercy Tavern in New York. At this hyper-local dinner, he'll prepare a six- to eight-course meal on Matthews Farm using produce sourced from the farm itself and organic suppliers no more than 10 miles away, paired with library wines plucked from the depths of the Matthews and Tenor wine cellars.

National Taco Day Fundraiser
As a fundraiser for the Northwest Immigration Rights Project and to celebrate National Taco Day, Marination will serve a "Kokua Taco," named for the Hawaiian term for kindness and goodwill without anything expected in return and made with kalua pork, homemade avocado salsa, pineapple pico de gallo, and cotija cheese. The taco will be served at all three locations as well as Super Six.

PERFORMANCE

Drag the Vote
To encourage voters to update their registration information and get to the polls for the upcoming general election, local drag legend Arson Nicki will host a radical, politics-themed show with their talented friends (Angel Baby KillKillKill, Angela Visalia, Cannoli, Dutchess Drew, Nightshade, and Mr. Dr. Professor, MD). If you're not already registered, you can do so at the event.

READINGS & TALKS

Alice Walker
Even if you think you don’t know Alice Walker, you know Alice Walker: She’s the brilliant, Pulitzer Prize–winning wordsmith behind The Color Purple, not to mention dozens of other award-worthy works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. She’s also an activist who is well-regarded for her work in the civil rights and feminist movements. On this night, she will give a talk and read from a new book of poems, Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart, which “bears witness to our troubled times, while also chronicling Walker’s well-lived life.” LEILANI POLK

Jake Uitti: 100 Things To Do In Seattle Before You Die and Unique Eats and Eateries of Seattle
Go to this reading to be privy to Stranger contributor and former Third Place employee Jake Uitti's favorite food spots around town.

Lit Crawl: Seattle-Kick Off Party and Fundraiser
Before the author extravaganza that is Capitol Hill's Lit Crawl next week, celebrate with fellow book lovers over drinks, music, and a silent auction. Guests will also get a sneak peak of what's in store for the main event.

Nicole Chung: All You Can Ever Know
In her debut memoir, All You Can Ever Know, Nicole Chung, a frequent contributor to glossy magazines and former editor of the millennial favorite the Toast, details how she came to be. Born premature and put up for adoption, Chung was raised in small-town Oregon by a family of white people. The narrative of her adoption, the story she’d always believed, was that her birth parents had been forced to give her up so she’d have a better life. As an adult, Chung started to wonder if that simple narrative was correct, and she began a search for the family that gave her up. In this searing memoir, Chung captures what it’s like to be different, and to discover the truth. KATIE HERZOG

Poetic Justice: A Reading and Benefit for Separated Families
Thousands of immigrant families separated under Trump's "zero tolerance" policy are still seeking justice and unification. This group reading with Washington State Poet Laureate Claudia Castro Luna, Frances McCue, Michael Schmeltzer, and Kelli Russell Agodon will support the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project.

THURSDAY-FRIDAY

COMEDY

Indie Month
I started taking improv classes at Jet City in January, and in that time I’ve learned two things: (1) How to “yes, and…,” and (2) nobody has a neutral opinion about improv. So! This month's events are either absolutely for you or absolutely not. Either way, studies prove laughing with a bunch of other people IRL is good for you, and this could be one remedy for when the SAD sets in. Featuring more than 35 groups and 100 performers with four teams performing a night, the festival features everything from Yeah Okay (an amazingly quick-witted ensemble) to Thunder Gap (a six-member team of experienced and multitalented improvisers tackling long-form improv with grit, goofiness, and groundedness). KATIE KURTZ
This week: Schrödinger’s CatBox, Wood 4 Sheep, Carskee, and Thunder Gap (Thursday) & Yesterday’s Cake, Dead Letters, Vultures?!, and Zach & Kayla (Friday)

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Dante Marioni
Marioni's lovely and justly celebrated glass art is often a throwback to the beautiful, symmetrical design of Venetian, Greek, and even Etruscan traditions, though he has also created reticello "gourds" inspired by African basketry. But his forms are anything but monotonous: Many of his vessels would look appropriate in a German expressionist sci-fi film.
Closing Saturday

Heike Brachlow
Munich-born Heike Brachlow, now working not far from London, carefully balances her highly varied, colorful, and ingenious glass objects—expect precarious pendulums, columns, tops, and wobbly cylinders.
Opening Thursday

Zack Bent: In Memoria
In the summer of 2014, Zack Bent began taking his three sons on regular pilgrimages to a plot of land just south of Cle Elem, Washington. When he began visiting this site, it had just been burned by a forest fire; today, the region is showing signs of regeneration and regrowth. Through a series of photographs of his children interacting with the land over the span of four years—as well as sculptures made from overwintered tarps—Bent has documented not only the transformation of the land, but also the growth of his children into adolescents. It's a way of experiencing the land that many of us aren't accustomed to, in which time is subordinate to space, rather than the other way around. EMILY POTHAST
Opening Thursday

PERFORMANCE

Nrityagram Dance Ensemble
This all-female classical Indian dance company, joined by members of the Chitrasena Dance Company of Sri Lanka, will be something to see: The New York Times has all but said that the dancers are literally divine.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

FILM

Orcas Island Film Festival
Head to Orcas Island for this film festival—with 30 feature-length and short films—featuring progressive plots and directors.

Tacoma Film Festival
Tacoma's offering to the Northwest international film scene includes more than 100 movies, talks, a VR studio, workshops, and parties.

PERFORMANCE

Solo: A Festival of Dance
Solo dancers selected for clarity of ideas, use of space, and innovative composition will take over the stage during this festival of 20-minute performances.

FRIDAY

ART

UnWedged: A National Juried Exhibition
UnWedged is Pottery Northwest's annual, national Juried Contemporary Ceramic Exhibition. This time, it will be juried by potter Julia Galloway.
Opening Friday

FOOD & DRINK

Viking Disco & Feast
Don your horned helmet and party like it's 1066 at this Viking disco with LUSHY and DJ Jonasson. Prizes will be awarded for best costume, and dancers will be replenished with a hearty feast by Chef James Bushell.

PERFORMANCE

Grotesque Burlesque
Old Witch and other drag anomalies will act out "A Violation in Human Form." The organizers write: "As the terror gives birth to horror, the melodrama to disgust, and arousal turns to obscenity, the distortions and limits of the human body will be made all too real." Be warned. (There will also be tarot reading by Demonia Creeper and a "spooky craft.")

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Maja Petrić: We Are All Made of Light
Who knew that there were so many awards for light art? Maja Petrić knows, because she's either won or been nominated for a number of them. A Ph.D. in DXARTS (digital art and experimental media) from University of Washington, she's contributing to the Borealis Festival of Light with an exhibition called We Are All Made Of Light, in collaboration with computer scientist Mihai Jalobeanu. Artificial intelligence generates "audiovisual trails" of every visitor, combining them with the traces of previous gallery-goers.
Opening Friday

FESTIVALS

Leavenworth Oktoberfest
Leavenworth is as close as you'll get to an actual Bavarian village without getting on a plane to Germany. For their three-weekend Oktoberfest celebration, they'll have beer, live music, and bratwurst. Leavenworth's mayor, Cheri Kelley Farivar, will perform the ceremonial tapping of the keg on Saturdays.

Puyallup Festival of Books
Calling all bookworms: This fifth annual Puyallup festival promises two full days of book and author events, including a Friday screening of an episode of Longmire, followed by a talk with Craig Johnson, who wrote the novels. On Saturday, don't miss Jeremy McCarter, co-author of Hamilton: The Revolution, who will speak about his process working with Lin-Manuel Miranda.

FOOD & DRINK

14th Annual Great Pumpkin Beer Festival
The great pumpkin in question at Elysian Brewing Company’s annual squash-themed celebration is a gigantic gourd weighing in at several hundred pounds. It’s scooped out, scorched, filled with pumpkin beer, sealed, conditioned, and tapped at the event. What’s more, more than 80 pumpkin beers, including around 20 from Elysian, will be poured. Come clad in orange—some costumed audience member will be plucked from the crowd to be judged onstage and win a “thirst-quenching prize.” JULIANNE BELL

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

FILM

Social Justice Film Festival: #HopeDemocracy
As social justice provides the only throughline, many of the movies have little in common. But the selection skews toward limber, on-the-ground filmmaking in the midst of protests and conflicts. The organizers write: "This year's screenings will fill in the national and local picture on immigration, Native American rights, Black Lives Matter, prisoner justice, and more. The festival will host several screenings with community groups and activists." Don't miss the Indigenous Futures event at the Duwamish Longhouse, where you'll meet Native filmmakers and watch their works.

FOOD & DRINK

Cowabunga
Lauding itself as "America's largest festival of beef," Seattle Met's Cowabunga festival presents an all-you-can-eat weekend full of cook-offs and cow meat tastings (with some attention paid to seafood, cake, and booze, too).

PERFORMANCE

Solo Performance Month
Seventy-five performers from all over Seattle bring short solo works to life during this extravaganza of indie talent, full of weird, cute, satirical, profound, queer, goofy, profane, and spiritual acts. This week, check out Elena Martinez | Dog Mom: Your Canine and Christ and Ponch | Prelude in the West: A Sordid Story of the Seattle Seamstresses.

A Thousand Splendid Suns
Based on Khaled Hosseini's best-selling novel, A Thousand Splendid Suns shows what happens when two women, Laila and Mariam, join in unbreakable friendship in wartime Kabul.

SATURDAY

ART

The Seattle Pancakes & Booze Art Show
That's right, hungry thirsty art-starved pancake aficionados, this show's got everything you need: 70 or more artist vendors, a free pancake bar, DJs, and body painting.

COMEDY

Kathleen Madigan: Boxed Wine and Bigfoot
Midwest comic Kathleen Madigan, whose Bothering Jesus special skewers the Southern school system, retirement villages, the news, and her parents, will bring her wonderfully deep, sardonic voice to the Seattle stage.

LOL! for SCLC: A Comedy Event for Economic Justice
The local grumpy wit El Sanchez will headline this big bash for legal aid for people with disabilities.

The Nightmare Society
The Nightmare Society tells the story of a commune of artists who act out your nightmares at the sound of a grandfather clock. Explore your deepest fears while intermittently giggling at the revival of this hit improvised horror show, which always comes up with bizarre and compelling imagery.

FOOD & DRINK

One Night Only: Brendan McGill + Mutsuko Soma + Kid Hops
Chef Mutsuko Soma has won accolades for her Fremont Japanese restaurant Kamonegi, where she painstakingly crafts excellent soba noodles by hand and which was named one of the best new restaurants of 2018 by Eater and Bon Appétit. Chef Brendan McGill is known for Hitchcock, his cozy Bainbridge Island eatery focusing on sustainable, locally sourced fare that was named one of the top 10 best new restaurants by the Seattle Times and Seattle magazine in 2011. At this pop-up dinner soundtracked by KEXP DJ Kid Hops, the two chefs—who first crossed paths in culinary school and worked together at the Madison Valley restaurant Harvest Vine—will reunite for a feast that pays tribute to their mutual love of Japanese food. If you needed any more convincing, both Soma and McGill have been nominated for James Beard Awards, and both of their establishments made the cut for the list of the 10 best restaurants in Seattle right now in The Stranger’s 2018 Visitors’ Guide. In other words: Cop a ticket as soon as humanly possible. JULIANNE BELL

READINGS & TALKS

Ashley Stull Meyers and Joyce Rosario
Come for "civic and global dialogue about contemporary art and performance" from curators, directors, and other arts luminaries from around the world, starting with Ashley Stull Meyers and Joyce Rosario in October.

Finnegans Wake
Seattle composer, musician, and substitute teacher Neal Kosaly-Meyer will continue his amazing feat of reciting Finnegan's Wake from memory, chapter by chapter—as if reading the modernist monster wasn't hard enough.

Gramma Reading Series #2
Some poetry readings blow your mind and expand your understanding of yourself and other people and the world. Others make you want to jump in a moss bog and die. This one, organized by local poetry pros Gramma Press, belongs squarely in the former category. Pulitzer Prize-winner Tyehimba Jess will perform poems from Olio, his four-dimensional book about the history of American music from minstrel shows to ragtime. Kaveh Akbar (Calling a Wolf a Wolf) and Seattle civic poet Anastacia-Reneé will join him with stellar poems of their own. But it’s not all poetry! My favorite dance group in town, Au Collective, will perform Moonshine. It’s a new cabaret from Imana Gunawan about the moon’s feelings. Does it love us? Does it hate us? Will it ever just stop? RICH SMITH

Natalie Diaz: Self-Portraits
Most people know Natalie Diaz for the hilarious and poignant poetry found in her first collection, When My Brother Was an Aztec (Copper Canyon Press). But at Hugo House, she'll reveal a series of self-portraits paired with new poems as part of a discussion about contemporary Native identity. Her presentation falls on the 150th anniversary of the birth of Edward S. Curtis, the Seattle-based photographer credited with creating the images white America associates with Native Americans, which makes this whole thing hum with historical significance. RICH SMITH

Sy Montgomery: How to Be a Good Creature
Naturalist, adventurer, and friend of the animals Sy Montgomery will read from her newest writing about the incredible creatures of our planet, "from tarantulas to tigers," and the significance they have for her own life.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Quenton Baker: Ballast
In 1841, American-born slaves on the brig Creole, led by a man named Madison Washington, commandeered the ship bringing them toward a continued life of misery and cruelty. They landed on British territory, where they found their freedom. Award-winning local poet Quenton Baker takes off on this story to examine black history from a personal standpoint, as he did in his collection This Glittering Republic. The survival struggle of long-ago people and the lingering effects of slavery on the psyche of those born free inspired Baker’s “erasure poems,” which he created by blacking out words in the Senate report on the Creole. Baker uses this selective elimination process to take control of the historical narrative, directing the viewer’s consciousness to unintended meanings. The title of this exhibition, which will also be issued as a book, refers to the ballast counterweighting the Creole's human cargo. JOULE ZELMAN
Opening Saturday

SUNDAY

ART

Alloy & Pffft: Sara Osebold and Ellen Ziegler
Virtually every visual artist is a scavenger of some form or another, hoarding scrap materials and other objects that ordinary people see as garbage. Through the alchemical transformation of art making, these materials can take on new life. The nature of this new life is examined in Alloy & Pffft, a two-person show from multimedia artist and longtime SOIL member Ellen Ziegler and printmaker/sculptor Sara Osebold. As the name suggests, Robertson Garage is a pop-up venue located in the garage of artist Barbara Robertson. On Sunday, September 23, from 2 to 5 p.m., both artists will be on site for an open studio to discuss art and friendship. EMILY POTHAST
Closing Sunday

COMEDY

Improvised Chekhov
Once again evincing impressive ambition, this improv company will act out scenes based on your suggestions and the classic Russian plays Uncle Vanya, The Cherry Orchard, or The Three Sisters. Since the drama of Anton Chekhov relies on deep character development, complex social mores, and lingering melancholy, these performances—if successful—will truly be coups de thèâtre.

COMMUNITY

Chris Cornell: An Everlasting Tribute to Seattle's Son
The late Seattle singer/songwriter Chris Cornell, Soundgarden's charismatic front man, will be immortalized in the form of a life-sized bronze statue, thanks to his wife, Vicky Cornell. Witness the unveiling and watch footage of a special Soundgarden performance at Wiltern in the Sky Church.

FOOD & DRINK

Osteria La Spiga 20th Anniversary
The Capitol Hill restaurant will celebrate 20 years of serving their delicious Northern Italian fare with a signature birthday menu and live music from local funk-jazz jammers West Seattle Soul.

MUSIC

Lovefingers, Heidi Lawden
Andy “Lovefingers” Hogge is a veteran, with two decades of experience as a DJ and label-head behind the weird music imprint ESP Institute. A native Angeleno, he relocated to his hometown just as LA began taking off as the de facto North American capital for underground dance music. His voracious taste is hard to describe, but if you spend some time in a SoundCloud wormhole under the “Balearic” tag, you might get an idea of the vibe he’ll bring to the Loft on a Sunday night with his partner-in-crime, Heidi Lawden, who hosts the Magic Roundabout show on dublab.com. GREG SCRUGGS