Olivia Colman is a Best Actress nominee in this year's Golden Globes for The Favourite.

It's a magnificent weekend for movies: Alfonso Cuaron's Roma, Yorgos Lanthimos's The Favourite, and Chang-dong Lee's Burning are all opening. Plus, the Golden Globes nominations have been announced—any nominees still playing in Seattle this weekend are starred in the list below. Follow the links below to see complete showtimes, tickets, and trailers for all of our critics' picks, and, if you're looking for even more options, check out our film events calendar and complete movie times listings.

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Note: Movies play Thursday–Sunday unless otherwise specified.

*At Eternity's Gate
Julian Schnabel (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly), using Willem Dafoe as a conduit, dives into the mind of Vincent Van Gogh in a subjective and non-linear portrayal. Oscar Isaac and Mads Mikkelsen round out the cast.
SIFF Cinema Uptown
Friday–Sunday
*Golden Globe nomination:
Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama (Willem Dafoe)

Best in Show
It's a mockumentary about dog shows! It mocks dog shows while also mocking the documentary form as a whole! Truly, its irreverence is unmatched. (It's also got Jane Lynch, Catherine O'Hara, and Parker Posey, which is a big plus.)
Scarecrow Video
Saturday only

*Bohemian Rhapsody
I heart Queen. The song this film is named for was on the soundtrack of my youth. But early reactions to the film biopic (that’s more about Freddie Mercury than the British rock band he led) have been mixed to bad. The New York Times’ Kyle Buchanan tweeted that Bohemian Rhapsody “is a glorified Wikipedia entry but Rami Malek plays Freddie Mercury (and wears his wonderful costumes) with incredible gusto.” Our own Chase Burns was not a fan at all. ("The 15-minute long shit I took during the middle of the movie was more nuanced than the straight-washed hagiography peddled in that movie theater.") In sum, enter at your own risk. LEILANI POLK
Various locations
*Golden Globe nominations:
Best Motion Picture - Drama
Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama (Rami Malek)

Border
Ali Abbasi's film is Sweden's 2019 submission to the Oscars, and it certainly looks like a bizarre Nordic treat. A border agent with the power to smell human emotions lives an isolated life until she meets a man who shares her ability. But she still has much to discover about herself. Some critics are hailing this movie, based on a story by the writer of Let the Right One In, as an uncategorizable masterpiece.
SIFF Cinema Egyptian & SIFF Cinema Uptown

*Boy Erased
This film features the most prolific twinks of our time: Troye Sivan, Lucas Hedges, and Nicole Kidman. These three gays will dazzle the screen in this year's most star-studded gay flick—oh wait, Troye Sivan is the only gay among them. Lucas Hedges has said he’s “not totally straight, but also not gay and not necessarily bisexual,” and Nicole Kidman, despite being the world's most famous twink, is surprisingly a 51-year-old Australian woman. While think pieces on Hedges’s sexuality will probably dominate the conversation around Boy Erased, it looks like a cute holiday movie about gay conversion therapy. Go see it! CHASE BURNS
Meridian 16
*Golden Globe nomination:
Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama (Lucas Hedges)

Burning
The Korean auteur Chang-dong Lee has only directed a handful of films, but what a handful: Poetry, probably his most famous film to date, won a boatload of awards around the world, including Best Screenplay and Ecumenical Jury Prize at Cannes (it was also nominated for the supreme Palme d'Or), while his earlier Oasis won the Golden Space Needle at our own Seattle International Film Festival. (Lee has also been the Minister of Culture since 2003, which is maybe why he hasn't made more movies.) His latest, Burning, an adaptation of a Murakami short story, has won the International Cinephile Society Awards' Palme d'Or. It's about a glamorous young man with a destructive hobby, an ordinary, underemployed guy who fears he'll do something bad, and a playful, seductive girl who may or may not have a cat. It's being hailed as a tense masterpiece.
Northwest Film Forum
Friday-Sunday

*Can You Ever Forgive Me?
In Can You Ever Forgive Me?, Melissa McCarthy stars as real-life best-selling biographer Lee Israel. But this isn’t a life of literary glitz and glamour that you're imagining after such a juicy introductory sentence! After falling on hard biographer times, Israel turned to a life of writerly crimes, forging letters from long-dead authors to make just enough cash to pay her rent, take her cat to the vet, and aggressively drink. This all sounds sad, I know, but there’s warmth underneath, thanks to Israel’s friendship with the charming, equally self-destructive Jack Hock (Richard E. Grant). McCarthy, who’s made a career of portraying loud women, is a different kind of jerk here—a real person who lashes out not for laughs, but because life is hard and she knows she’s making bad choices. ELINOR JONES
SIFF Cinema Uptown & AMC Seattle 10
*Golden Globe nominations:
Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama (Melissa McCarthy)
Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Richard E. Grant)

Creed II
Creed II is a Rocky sequel. A good Rocky sequel, even. But the one thing it doesn't really feel like is a sequel to Creed. MGM decided they weren't gonna wait for Ryan Coogler to write or direct a follow-up to his 2015 miracle. So Stallone took back the reins for Creed II, building a story around what appears to be the very first idea he had: What if it was just another misshapen, lunkheaded Rocky movie that ignores why these characters work? Thankfully, Creed II rises above Stallone's desire for standardization due to the strengths of its characters. All the good-to-great things that Jordan, Tessa Thompson, Phylicia Rashad, and yes, even Dolph Lundgren (!) are doing feel like they’re happening in spite of the story Stallone’s foisted upon director Stephen Caple Jr., and it's easy to believe Caple spent most of his time trying to rehabilitate Stallone's fundamentally busted concept. BOBBY ROBERTS
Various locations

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald
DO NOT SEE THIS MOVIE if you are not a Harry Potter nerd. If you aren’t going to immediately go home to discuss and consider various possible plot developments while your movie date reads you random opinions from the deep internet, do not go and see this movie. The thing is 134 minutes long, and the plot is thick and almost excruciatingly detailed. It might be difficult to follow if you’re not super fresh on your Harry Potter knowledge. I recommend seeing it at a theater with extremely comfortable seating, and not skimping on snacks. Luckily, some truly remarkable cinematography and delightful cast of magical folk and beasts make the ride an enjoyable one, even when you’re feeling overwhelmed with new information. JENNI MOORE
Various locations

*The Favourite
Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos knows how to get under the skin of emotions and situations in a way that’s surreal, but it makes his observations feel closer to actual truth. The Favourite is a historical period piece that pulls less heady tricks than his previous efforts, its focus on the relationship between two cousins (played by Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone) vying for the favor of Olivia Colman’s sickly Queen Anne in early 18th century England. The actresses churn out incredible performances, hysterically and humorously jockeying for control over each other, the palace, and themselves. Lanthimos still manages to throw in a few strange elements, like the use of a fish eye camera lens and silly dancing sequences, but in a way, it only heightens the characters’ believability. JASMYNE KEIMIG
SIFF Cinema Egyptian
*Golden Globe nominations:
Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy
Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Best Actress in a Supporting role (Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz)

Free Solo
This highly praised, dizzying documentary reveals the heart-stopping journey of Alex Honnold as he conquered Yosemite's El Capitan wall without ropes or safety gear. You don't need to be a climber to be thrilled at this glimpse into human accomplishment.
Ark Lodge Cinemas & AMC Seattle 10

The Great Buster
One of the most beloved funny people in American history, Buster Keaton has had an almost universal influence on global cinema. Peter Bogdanovich's documentary takes excerpts from restored films and interviews with such filmmakers, stunt performers, and actors as Mel Brooks, Quentin Tarantino, Werner Herzog, Dick van Dyke, and Johnny Knoxville.
Grand Illusion

*Green Book
Green Book tells the supposedly true story of a Black jazz pianist, Dr. Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali), and his white driver, Tony Lip (Viggo Mortensen), as they go on a concert tour through the segregated South in 1962. Although they’re both from New York, they’re from entirely different worlds: Shirley moves through the rarified air of highbrow culture. Tony, on the other hand, is an Italian American stereotype made sentient, a “whattsamattayou” tough guy with a tenderly soft underbelly. Green Book’s biggest red flag is that it’s essentially another Driving Miss Daisy story about how to solve racism in three convenient acts. But the movie’s really nice, and it’s hard to get too mad at it. Ali and Mortensen are both awfully good, and the script, for all its familiarity, is kind of comforting in its shtick-y predictability. NED LANNAMANN
Various locations
*Golden Globe nominations:
Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy (Viggo Mortensen)
Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Mahershala Ali)
Best Director (Peter Farrelly)
Best Screenplay (Peter Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie)

Holidays on Ice
This series will be dedicated to movies about sports on the ice. Whether you want something heroic, dramatic, or downright silly, you can find something to suit your mood. This weekend's options include I, Tonya, The Cutting Edge, Mystery, Alaska, Goon, and Youngblood.
SIFF Film Center
Friday–Sunday

In the Soup
You should see this movie because a) Steve Buscemi is an adorable baby in it and b) it's a long-lost, much-beloved comedy that won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance in 1992 and c) it sounds like a wildly fun black-and-white indie rideabout an ambitious screenwriter (Buscemi), a freewheeling rogue who offers to be his producer (Seymour Cassel), and a lovely girl next door (Jennifer Beals).
Northwest Film Forum
Friday only

I Am Evidence
In October of 2015, after a legislative tour revealed that evidence rooms across the country were filled with untested rape kits, the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs polled their members on the number of unprocessed and unsubmitted rape kits in their custody, which came in just over 6,000. This information sparked a statewide effort that advocated for the creation and implementation of a "victim-centered, trauma-informed reform program." Learn more at this screening of the documentary I Am Evidence, followed by a discussion with Washington State Representative Tina Orwall, Washington State Attorney General’s Office Senior Investigator Lindsay Wade, and Leah Griffin of the Washington State Sexual Assault Forensic Examination Task Force.
Northwest Film Forum
Sunday only

It's a Wonderful Life
Shortly after It's a Wonderful Life's 1946 release, James Agee, one of the few American film critics of that era still worth reading, noted the film's grueling aspect. "Often," he wrote, "in its pile-driving emotional exuberance, it outrages, insults, or at least accosts without introduction, the cooler and more responsible parts of the mind." These aesthetic cautions are followed, however, by a telling addendum: "It is nevertheless recommended," Agee allowed, "and will be reviewed at length as soon as the paralyzing joys of the season permit." Paralyzing joys are the very heart of George Bailey's dilemma; they are, to borrow words from George's father, "deep in the race." The sacrifices George makes for being "the richest man in town" resonate bitterly even as they lead to the finale's effusive payoff. Those sacrifices are what make It's a Wonderful Life, in all its "Capraesque" glory, endure. This year marks the 48th consecutive year Grand Illusion has played the film. SEAN NELSON
Grand Illusion
Friday-Sunday

Memoir of War
The writer Marguerite Duras (played by Mélanie Thierry) provides a focal point for this unusual film about World War II, based on the cultural icon's autobiographical novel La Douleur. The film recounts Duras's desperate attempts in Vichy France to save her Resistant husband Robert Antelme from Nazi imprisonment. This film is France's submission to the 2019 Academy Awards.
Northwest Film Forum
Thursday only

*Mirai
Mirai unfolds through the eyes of Kun, a four-year-old boy traveling through time and space with his teenaged sister from the future, Mirai. The main conflict hinges on Kun learning to accept the addition of his new sister to their family (in the time he's most familiar with, Mirai is just a baby), but through his adventures, the film sinks into the wonder of all the small instances that had to occur for Kun to be born at all. Hosoda loves time-travel and technology-based stories, and his best movies up to this point, The Girl Who Leapt Through Time and Summer Wars, used animation's visual possibilities to create unique worlds for these explorations. What solidified my love for this film the most is how easy and life-affirming it is, without sacrificing any smarts. I was struck by the unique personalities of the characters. There are no real villains in Mirai, just differing perspectives. SUZETTE SMITH
Thornton Place
Saturday only
*Golden Globe nomination:
Best Motion Picture - Animated

Night Heat: The 41st Film Noir Series
They proliferated in anxious postwar America and still occasionally return to brood and smolder onscreen: films noirs, born of the chiaroscuro influence of immigrant German directors and the pressure of unique American fears. The last film is Heat, a deadly duel between Robert de Niro and Al Pacino set in LA.
Seattle Art Museum
Thursday only

Overlord
While carrying out a vital pre-D-Day mission, a ragtag bunch of American Dogfaces stumble across a small French village that’s just packed to the rafters with secret Gestapo experiments. (Note: In what may be a controversial move in this day and age, the Nazis are unequivocally depicted as the Bad Guys.) Genre mashups are often content to rest on their high-concept laurels, but this J.J. Abrams production is very willing to do the grunt work, solidly establishing its war movie bonafides—an early paratrooper sequence is genuinely alarming—before transitioning into full-tilt body horror. (This is an extremely moist movie.) If this sounds even remotely like your sort of thing, Overlord’s combination of heavy artillery and horrid creatures should prove to be pretty irresistible. When it comes to B-Movies, nasty, brutish, and short all count as positive traits. ANDREW WRIGHT
Meridian 16

Pr0n 4 Freakz
If you’ve been to Dan Savage’s HUMP! festival, you’ve already experienced the weird, awkward jollity of sitting in an auditorium with total strangers while watching other strangers fuck on the big screen. Whereas HUMP! leans more toward the participation of nonprofessionals, the new quarterly skin-flick series Pr0n 4 Freakz is explicit about its connection to professional sex work and performance. So what can you expect to see at the first Pr0n 4 Freakz? In addition to Saira Barbaric and Alistair Fyrn’s movies Revelations of the Beast and Uiara: River Monster, which feature characters like a lustful mermaid, a professor, and hot park rangers, there’ll be Shine Louise Houston’s Lyric Seal + Vai Do CrashPad, from the eponymous Portland-based website. Viewers can stay after the screenings for a panel with the performers and filmmakers. All the entries in Pr0n 4 Freakz were created by queer artists of color and their allies, with scenarios that range from (in their words) “surreal” to “voyeuristic.” JOULE ZELMAN
Northwest Film Forum
Saturday only

Prospect
Is this the first major work of Northwest science fiction? Indeed, it imagines a moon that is like the evergreen forests that surround Seattle. The whole planet is green—gothic green. And the light on this strange moon is sharply slanted like Northwest light. The superb film is about prospectors (a father and daughter) looking for a root-made gem that will make them rich. The daughter, however, is keen to get off the planet because the line to it is about to be shut down. But her father is money-mad. If he does not make it here, he will never make it anywhere in the galaxy. Translucent insects float through the air. There are other money-mad prospectors in the endless forest. You do not leave this planet without paying a big price. Money is the root of all evil. CHARLES MUDEDE
SIFF Cinema Uptown
Thursday only

*Ralph Breaks the Internet
The sequel to Wreck-It Ralph is Disney's strangely savvy and grown-up (but still fun-for-kids) take on the viruses, ads, social media networks, videos, and snake pits of idiocy on the web. Charles Pulliam-Moore of i09 wrote, "In its accurate depiction of the highs and lows the internet has to offer, Ralph Breaks the Internet also casually, and perhaps unavoidably, draws attention to something else about the ever-flattening global culture we’re all swimming in—and how Disney owns the rights to way, way too much of it."
Various locations
*Golden Globe nomination:
Best Motion Picture: Animated

*Roma
Alfonso Cuarón's paean to working-class Mexicans, a tale of a domestic worker and her relationship with her employer's family, has critics all but begging you to rush to the theater's to see it. Says a rapturous Ann Hornaday of the Washington Post: "With Roma, one of our finest filmmakers has delved into an experience uniquely his own to create something that feels simultaneously sui generis and universal, deeply private and instantly recognizable. That describes a great work of art, and that’s precisely what Roma is." We'll have our own review for you soon, but don't wait to see it.
Cinerama
*Golden Globe nominations:
Best Motion Picture - Foreign Language
Best Director (Alfonso Cuarón)
Best Screenplay (Alfonso Cuarón)

Searching for Ingmar Bergman
There are brilliant filmmakers, smart filmmakers, and intellectual filmmakers. My definition of an intellectual movie is a work that comes closest to reaching the depth of literature—the highest form of intellectual art. Searching for Ingmar Bergman is a documentary by Margarethe von Trotta, an intellectual filmmaker. Her last documentary was about the German Jewish philosopher Hannah Arendt. Her new film explores the life and deep mind of Ingmar Bergman, the Swedish director who made high art out of cinema. CHARLES MUDEDE
Grand Illusion
Thursday only

*A Star Is Born
If you’re entering the theatre simply desiring a couple solid musical numbers, then your $15 will not have been spent in vain. Unfortunately, the movie falls flat as only a two-dimensional vignette of common misogyny can. Ally, the lead character played by Lady Gaga, is a woman who knows she has talent but needs to hear that she is sufficiently pretty to be an appropriate vehicle for said talent. Like any woman vying for a piece of the proverbial pie, she is just one man away from success. One man to lead her, to mold her, to push her through to the finish line. This man-shaped void is filled by her father, her husband, her manager, her producer, her choreographer, and her photographer, all of whom take credit or receive credit from other men for her creative output and appearance. A Star Is Born is a classic tale, meant to be mutable, fluid, to adapt within each age it is reimagined. But the flaws of the inherent narrative are too real, too every-day damaging to continue being told in the form of a cinematic fantasy. KIM SELLING
Various locations
*Golden Globe nominations:
Best Motion Picture – Drama
Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama (Lady Gaga)
Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama (Bradley Cooper)
Best Director – Motion Picture (Bradley Cooper)

Weekend at Dunkirk
Ultra-cool French New Wave star Jean-Paul Belmondo stars as a French lieutenant debating whether to evacuate his troops ahead of German attack or hold out until the British army arrives.
Scarecrow Video
Friday only

Westworld
My interest in the new HBO Westworld has been tepid. Sure, it has a fancy look and all, but the premise (an adult theme park that is more than just a theme park—a place where rich men go to fuck and kill androids) seems very limited. So why watch the original Westworld? Because it has historical or archeological value. Made in 1973, and starring Yul Brynner, the film presents androids as completely mechanical. Behind an android’s face: wires, screws, circuit boards, and the like. This is a pre-biotech world. By Blade Runner (1982), the mechanical robot was in decline, replaced by bioengineered monsters. CHARLES MUDEDE
Living Computers
Thursday only

Widows
Widows is an overflowing plateful of entertainment, piled high with juicy plot, buttery performances, and plenty of sweet genre pie. It’s a mash-up of pulp and prestige that shouldn’t work well on paper but plays out tremendously well on-screen. Director Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) cowrote the twisty script with novelist Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl, Sharp Objects), and while the interconnected webs of Chicago’s crime underworld and its racially charged local politics contain more than enough intrigue, the performances are what’ll grab you. I mean, just look at this cast: Harry (Liam Neeson) leads a crew of career criminals (including Jon Bernthal and Manuel Garcia-Rulfo) in a heist that goes disastrously wrong, leaving their widows Veronica (Viola Davis), Linda (Michelle Rodriguez), and Alice (Elizabeth Debicki) with a serious problem when crime boss Jamal Manning (Brian Tyree Henry) and his enforcer brother Jatemme (Daniel Kaluuya) demand they return the stolen money. The real fun is watching McQueen, Flynn, and this ridiculously large talent pool of actors lay the groundwork for a slick, rich, tantalizing thriller, and then connecting all the dots. NED LANNAMANN
Various locations

Also Playing:
Our critics don't recommend these movies, but you might like to know about them anyway.

Dr. Seuss's The Grinch

Instant Family

The Nutcracker and the Four Realms

The Possession of Hanna Grace

Robin Hood

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