Buy Art!

If You Have Never Bought a Piece of Original Art, You Are Doing Life Wrong

Comments

1
Is the recession over? I hadn't noticed.
2
We can tell our values by looking at our checkbook stubs. Gloria Steinem
3
Great article, really glad you brought up the idea of making payments, my friends do that a lot when they want a piece.
4
i've bought a few things from ghost gallery.. 500 and 100 dollars and they are great.
5
Another even lower-budget way to support local artists is to buy lots of their cards - Art FX in Fremont has an abundance of these, for instance. They tend to be about $5 and a nice card can be given in lieu of a gift to many people; or they can off-set a crappy gift. They are sometimes prints, sometimes originals. Always small, cool little presents that support the arts and the local economy.
6
Funny, Jonathan Wakuda and I were just talking about this tonight as we put new wheatpastes in Post Alley! Btw, any wheatpasters out there, head to Post Alley--the gum wall is invading the post wall!

Xavier-
7
As someone who's been shouting this manifesto for some time, I'm happy to see the tide turning and more and more projects coming to light that make art buying more approachable. I think that it's only a matter of shifting priorities for a little while, if you want art in your life. I put off buying a new laptop for a few months so that I could purchase a painting. I'm a broke ass fool - if I can do it, anyone can. Sometimes art only costs as much as a month's worth of lattes. What can we do to make room in our lives, despite the recession? Unlike electronics or lattes, art lasts.

Seattle's bursting at the seams, it's an exciting time to start buying!

8
No one buys art because we all think we are Artists here.
9
I used to live a few hours north of Seattle and my favorite piece of artwork I ever bought was at a gallery in Seattle for $20. Art is totally affordable for any price range.
10
I partnered with local artist and started an online gallery selling high quality prints and photography. You can check it out here: http://arisingtide.org

Use the code happyholidays for a 10% discount. :)
11
Good and needed article Jen. Thank you.

I have offered the payment plan many times. One collector even took two years to pay and it worked out for both of us.

There is nothing like the feeling of watching someone become enamored with a piece of art and so I will do all I can to facilitate their purchase.
12
#8 what has that got to do with anything? I'm an artist, and my walls are becoming more and more filled with the work of amazing local artists. Do you think authors don't buy other author's books?
13
Don't forget about buying art directly from artists that aren't represented by a gallery. Plenty of talented under-the-radar and/or emerging artists out there to love and encourage with your enthusiasm and dollars. As the article mentioned, it's not always purely about the money but the motivation it gives the artist to keep going. That's especially true for artists not yet represented by a gallery.
14
@10 - I love this idea. I rarely come across art that I both want and I can afford*, and I'm ALWAYS hoping the artist made prints, and so far I've been disappointing every time.

*Don't get me wrong, I get that $300 for a painting probably barely pays for supplies. $1,500 might actually pay an artist for their time.

15
@12 - I think the poster is implying we're all broke.
16
Bravo .. thanks for this article Jen ..buy art people, it will make you happier and cooler!
17
I have a confession to make. Not only am I an artist, co-curator of the Echo Echo Gallery at the Greenwood Collective--I am also a huge fan of art. I have purchased all sorts of art from Roq La Rue, Starheadboy, Narboo, Ryan Henry Ward, Flatcolor when it was around--and I can tell you--almost every artist, art gallery etc. is willing to work with you, bend over backwards to make a sale. I have almost always paid over time for big pieces and no one has ever made me feel like I was anything but an important client--believe me--Seattle's artists are working their butts off and this is their livelihood--they want to work with you! And keep in mind that there are galleries for every taste--every one should have S3A on their links, it is an excellent resource for many of the galleries that might not be as well known but that are doing some of the most amazing work!
18
Anthropomorhpise Me-- honestly--artists are the biggest fans of other artists. They are the biggest purchasers of art. I personally own work by Jenny Holzer,Robert Rauschenberg, Jeff Koons, Victorian art, Works by Ego, Joe Vollan, Maggie Harbaugh, Starheadboy, Ryan Henry Ward, Tnglr and so many others!
19
Don't forget, art lovers and viewers, to go to galleries that might be a bit off the beaten track in neighborhoods, like Patricia Cameron Gallery on Dexter Ave. N. in the Lake Union neighborhood, Francine Seders Gallery in the Phinney neighborhood, and also to come to the neighborhood ARTwalks. My studio is in the fabulous BallardWorks building, where 20 artists' studios are open from spring to winter on the 2nd Saturday, 6-9 PM--it's free and friendly, excellent art is inexpensive, the chance to visit an artist in her studio is a gift, yet hardly anything ever sells! After a long time working in Seattle, a great working environment, I tend to shrug, allow that many people would probably "rather be sailing," and continue to work hard and present my work to viewers as often as I can. Exhorting, admonishing and encouraging the newer generation of art lovers into becoming art buyers is a great idea! Thanks!
Sincerely,
Joan Stuart Ross
http://www.joanstuartross.com
20
1. I have a dozen or so original paintings in my house, purchased for $500-$1200 each. We have a bunch of prints stored away because we've run out of display space. Let me establish that I Like Art.

2. I've never heard of a gallery offering me terms. MAYBE THEY SHOULD ADVERTISE THIS FACT? I am a professional, I have money to spend, I don't look "poor", but I do not typically receive a warm reception in a gallery, where more often that not I am the only person there who is not an employee. HOW FUCKING BUSY ARE YOU?

3. Having spent many years performing music at art openings (generally for free or no more than $75 in a few cases), allowing me hours to look at art and contemplate the asking price, I have concluded that a typical painting is priced at a month's rent and utilities for the artist. I understand--everyone's got to eat, but you've also got to decide if you want to sell paintings, at all. Or, if it's better to sell two paintings at $500 (yes, I know--paint is expensive, etc, etc--consider smaller paintings, they're easier to display in modest dwellings) or zero paintings at $1200. Eventually you will run out of space to store unsold paintings.
21
Personally, I don't agree that it's so difficult to sell art in Seattle. Modern artists are too dependent on traditional forms of peddling their work and that's what is holding them back.

If you are an artist who has decided that art is too hard to sell or Seattle is not a good place to be an artist, well then you are a QUITTER and you will never make a name for yourself. Galleries and artwalks are not the only way to sell art, nor are they the most effective. You need to do more than mope around begging gallery owners to show your work or trying to sell one $1,500 painting every two months to a patron.

With a skillful use of the internet, artists can sell lots of art. Personally, I feel Seattle is the best place to be an artist and I make a great living creating and selling art full time.

If anyone want to buy some of my art, I have limited edition prints and originals available for sale at: www.facebook.com/aaronruttenart or www.surrealpixelstudio.com
22
Personally, I don't agree that it's so difficult to sell art in Seattle. Modern artists are too dependent on traditional forms of peddling their work and that's what is holding them back.

If you are an artist who has decided that art is too hard to sell or Seattle is not a good place to be an artist, well then you are a QUITTER and you will never make a name for yourself. Galleries and artwalks are not the only way to sell art, nor are they the most effective. You need to do more than mope around begging gallery owners to show your work or trying to sell one $1,500 painting every two months to a patron.

With a skillful use of the internet, artists can sell lots of art. Personally, I feel Seattle is the best place to be an artist and I make a great living creating and selling art full time.

If anyone want to buy some of my art, I have limited edition prints and originals available for sale at: www.facebook.com/aaronruttenart or www.surrealpixelstudio.com
23
@20
"I've never heard of a gallery offering me terms."
Have you asked? And I don't mean that sarcastically. Have you ever point-blank said "I am interested in this piece of art, would I be able to make a down payment and pay it off over a few months?" I can't imagine any gallerist saying no to that. They don't advertise layaway because, hey, if you *can* pay it all off at once it will benefit both artist and gallery.

"I do not typically receive a warm reception in a gallery... HOW FUCKING BUSY ARE YOU?"
I'm sorry to hear that you've received cold shoulders. But, believe it or not, gallerists really ARE fucking busy. Behind the tranquil veneer there is a lot going on. Galleries are basically museums, offices, and retail stores all in one white-walled package. That surely doesn't excuse unfriendliness, but it does mean that they're not snubbing you on purpose.

Hopefully you can give Seattle galleries another shot!
24
@20

Huh. The first time I fell I love with a piece out of my price range it was $2000. Yup...$2000. It wasnt even finished yet, just a half done sketch on the wall of the gallery/studio. Way out of my price range. I told the artist I loved it. She offered me $25 a month, no interest payments.

I'm still making payments. But I have beautiful art.

I'd leave it t that, except I was just recently at another gallery where I saw another piece. Again, way out of my price range. I told the gallery owner how amazed I was by the piece. Within 2 minutes she had asked me what payment terms she could offer me to have me walk out of the gallery with piece in hand.

This would at least imply anecdotally, that if you ASK...you'll get an offer.

Buy art.
25
In case anyone is curious what LxWxH is, feel free to visit the website - www.lengthbywidthbyheight.com.

In short, it's original art in a box (sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, collage, etc) that you order online and it gets mailed to you! Historically, I've been curating in pairs and featuring a writer but 2013 is going to bring some changes, including the ability to buy individual pieces by artists under $200.

I'd also like to give props to ArtsYo! Like LxWxH, they promote the idea that art is a sustainable resource, and they make buying it super easy. www.seattle.artsyo.com
26
Jen -- what horrible subtitle to your article. "I hereby declare that anyone who is indifferent to a thing I like is doing life wrong." Frankly, I don't give a shit about your idea of art. As an engineer and project manager, venuring into the solace of the Olympic Mountains does far more for my soul than cleverly arranged plastic ribbons and photos of ketchup bottles, regardless of the breathless bullshit verbiage art reviewers attach to such doodlings.
27
Ms. Treacle and I just purchased a beautiful & huge piece of art two weeks ago for $500 + art trade. I was a little skeptical at first, but I love it! and it blends perfectly with everything in our room. So worth it. So, so worth it.
28
@26
Jen is making a Humanities argument. One which I happen to agree with. Appreciation and support of art is in the same category as supporting music and literature. Good for you for appreciating the Olympics...preservation and appreciation of the outdoors is critical. But your critique of Jen's art, art which doesn't speak to me either by the way, implies to the rest of us that you would benefit from exposure to more art. If you think that her art is all there is, you're far too sheltered. If you think that ALL art is worthless and overdone, you're TERRIFYINGLY close minded. You might not give a shit about HER art, but you should give a shit about ART. As an aside, there has been quite a bit of research and study on how the lack of humanities education in engineers, mathematicians, etc is greatly to their detriment.

Art, music, drama, literature, poetry, philosophy and discourse are the things that separate us from the rest of the animals.
29
BTW the Fremont artist DID buy the Terry Turrell painting for her birthday and she LOVES it!! Susan Grover was a delight to work for. Who better than Artists to appreciate and support other artists.
30
Art adds SO MUCH to one's environment. The energy in a room full of art is palpable. I Love it. I try to support other artist I admire. NO REGRETS and yes the Fremont artist did buy that Terry Turrell piece for her birthday and Susan Grover was a delight to work with. She delivered the art and hung it with a smile on a Sunday. Not only do I have a fabulous piece of timeless art I have a new friend.
31
@23 Sure, gallery employees/owners are busy. But I've never been to a gallery in Seattle that managed to hit the right point between "openly ignoring patrons" and "forcing an uncomfortable discussion about a particular piece".

I don't think it's too much to expect that someone from the gallery could acknowledge that I showed up, and then not subsequently try to make me feel stupid for missing some bullshit subtext about a piece in conversation.
32
Even if buying a piece of art wasn't a possibly-intimidating and usually-expensive proposition (even if a dealer/gallery owner helps 'make it work', I'm still out a few hundred bucks whether it be all at once or over time), beware the purchase of an unframed piece!

I recently purchased a small engraving for $80 - nice! Then I needed a mat cut for it and had it put in a frame for $275 - ouch! (I mean, I could have gone the way of the college student and push-pinned the thing to the wall, but that is disrespectful and I have some dignity.) I picked a nice frame and good glass for it, though - go big or go home.

It's a lesser-known cost of art purchasing, and if the piece is modest enough, it is certainly possible for a frame to cost more than the piece it will protect. Just a consideration.
33
As an artist who moved from Seattle to the east coast in March 2012, my move had absolutely nothing to do with sales. I just missed the northeast a whole lot. It was time to return home.

I was selling quite a bit of work. My friends thought I was crazy to move away because the business side of my painting was not only gaining momentum but had made drastic leaps.

Having said that, about 60% of my 2011 sales came from outside of Seattle, selling to places such as Denver, coastal Oregon, northern CA and NYC. And those sales were also all the highest priced work.

34
I honestly had no idea that payment plans for art existed. I am an artist myself--not visual--and I like the idea of all of this, but I am putting down plenty of money, constantly, supporting the artists within my discipline (=other writers) as Jen is suggesting we support visual artists here. I do have a few prints and a couple of other pieces that I bought for $150 or less, but I have admired many, many pieces I could not have handed over a lump of cash for on the spot. I would have considered a payment plan, though. My wall still has one open space...

I think we are all experiencing a lot of worthy demands on our wallets, not only from the basics of staying alive and all of that, but for those of us who are in arts communities, we like to buy books by local authors, support local nonprofits, or whatever makes us feel good. Art is one of those many things. To me, personally, books are just more personally relevant, and I buy them with reckless abandon. Each person has his/her point of personal relevance.
35
Buy art? That would presuppose taste. And if you think there is taste in Seattle, just look at the architecture here.
36
I have been thinking about this a lot since commenting yesterday. In the past, I have only bought art when I could afford to put down $100, $200 on the spot for a piece or a couple of pieces. I seriously had no idea that a payment plan was something that was done. Buying pieces of art I loved in galleries seemed completely out of my reach, and some of the pieces I have truly loved seemed like things I would never be able to afford if they were paid for out of a single paycheck. I always felt that I was allowed to appreciate art only inasmuch as I could look at it when it was publicly displayed, but the actual purchasing was left to those with substantially more means.

I think it's really important to talk more about some of the ideas and notes in this piece; "Every gallery wants to help you buy something if you love it"--I honestly hadn't thought of it that way. I didn't know about payment plans. I am still going to find all of it intimidating. I'm seeing a desire to keep this payment plan stuff somewhat quiet because there's the desire to limit how many people take advantage of it, but I just don't see more visibility being a bad thing. I think it would get more people willing to buy.
37
Hi All,
Thanks again, Jen for writing this article, addressing the issue.
And from the large amount of feedback, looks like there are plenty of ways to include Art in life.
I love to go to music and cultural events, I paint and have worked in the Wine Trade and with restaurants for 20 years (Manhattan, St. Thomas, Arizona and Washington).
I manage the Gallery [context] at Seattle Design Center.

In Manhattan a popular joke was:
"Oh you're an (Actor, Musician, Writer, Artist, Dancer)? Cool. Which Restaurant do you work at?"
and from a friend "Every day I wake up, look in the mirror and tell myself, dammit, Jim: you're an Actor. Now Act like a Waiter..."

Point is, Art adds so much to our lives that we just take for granted. It's like Farms. No Farms, No Food. No Art, No Pleasure, and No Survival.
For real. (Check out Darwin and the Survival of Novelty)
I do mean Art in general, all Artistic Disciplines and creative expressions.

Business is a highly creative field, ask any entreprenuer, producer, event planner, attorney, developer, contractor, VC, etc.
We all have to come up with solutions and adaptations to our changing environments, whether it is a supply-chain disruption, tsunami or a line drawing that is missing... something. That's what Humans Kick Ass at.

Art creates the space in our perception where we can relax and let someone else drive for a while.
Tell us a story. The right story can leave us refreshed, and offer new tools to engage our life with.
Art provides opportunities both for social engagement, discourse and contemplative reflection.

I love Art because there is a magic to it. Art that we love can influence our lives in so many ways. The experience of art can be like a good conversation, it helps us hone our perceptions.

Ultimately we may become stronger, more ourselves by experiencing other expressions. The increase in our self-worth and therefor our earning potential is difficult to measure. You will know when you feel it.
So jump on in! Nervous? Start easy: go look at art, ask a question, make a statement.

Be supportive. Purchase a small, inexpensive original artwork from a real live person in your city. Feel the impact of the investment you just made in your world, and the world of another.
It really can be that simple.

All good things,
-Zal.
38
Hi All,
Thanks again, Jen for writing this article, addressing the issue.
And from the large amount of feedback, looks like there are plenty of ways to include Art in life.
I love to go to music and cultural events, I paint and have worked in the Wine Trade and with restaurants for 20 years (Manhattan, St. Thomas, Arizona and Washington).
I manage the Gallery [context] at Seattle Design Center.

In Manhattan a popular joke was:
"Oh you're an (Actor, Musician, Writer, Artist, Dancer)? Cool. Which Restaurant do you work at?"
and from a friend "Every day I wake up, look in the mirror and tell myself, dammit, Jim: you're an Actor. Now Act like a Waiter..."

Point is, Art adds so much to our lives that we just take for granted. It's like Farms. No Farms, No Food. No Art, No Pleasure, and No Survival.
For real. (Check out Darwin and the Survival of Novelty)
I do mean Art in general, all Artistic Disciplines and creative expressions.

Business is a highly creative field, ask any entreprenuer, producer, event planner, attorney, developer, contractor, VC, etc.
We all have to come up with solutions and adaptations to our changing environments, whether it is a supply-chain disruption, tsunami or a line drawing that is missing... something. That's what Humans Kick Ass at.

Art creates the space in our perception where we can relax and let someone else drive for a while.
Tell us a story. The right story can leave us refreshed, and offer new tools to engage our life with.
Art provides opportunities both for social engagement, discourse and contemplative reflection.

I love Art because there is a magic to it. Art that we love can influence our lives in so many ways. The experience of art can be like a good conversation, it helps us hone our perceptions.

Ultimately we may become stronger, more ourselves by experiencing other expressions. The increase in our self-worth and therefor our earning potential is difficult to measure. You will know when you feel it.
So jump on in! Nervous? Start easy: go look at art, ask a question, make a statement.

Be supportive. Purchase a small, inexpensive original artwork from a real live person in your city. Feel the impact of the investment you just made in your world, and the world of another.
It really can be that simple.

All good things,
-Zal.
39
Thanks for sharing this article, Jen. I think it is extremely informative and eye-opening to many. I am a local artist, mostly a sculptor, who has been making work in a variety of materials and scales for almost 20 years now. I have extensive training in studio art in academic and non-academic settings. Though I have had some successes-such as limited grants and a couple public art commissions, I have always struggled to make a consistent income via art. I have avoided the gallery scene mostly because not all gallerists are created equal yet they all want %50 of my work. I hope to find the right commercial gallery one day, but until then, I will try to sell direct when possible. So far, though I am a metal sculptor, I have had the most luck selling paintings via commission. ( I have painted for many years and I used to paint murals and sets everyday for almost 8 years. So I didn't just pick up a brush and call myself a painter. Still, it is not what I'm most passionate about.) Just a few weeks ago I decided to try an Etsy experiment. I am selling small abstract paintings on wood panels from $50-$150 and other small, 2D works in copper. This is as affordable as it comes, in my opinion. It may be too cheap for me to sustain, but for now, if you love art, and want to see some of what't out there, please visit my Etsy shop, "The SeenShop" and Like me on my Facebook business page if you like what you see. Thanks! Best of luck to all artists and gallerists out there who are working hard everyday to share quality art with the world. Cheers and Happy Holidays! Nicki

http://www.facebook.com/TheSeenshop
http://www.etsy.com/shop/seenshop
Or, if you prefer sculpture, please visit my webpage, http://www.nickisucec.com/

THANKS!!
40
As a Seattle artist, Thank you.
www.kerrysmith-art.com
41
Thanks Jen, Interesting article and feedback. I love art. I collect art. I got rid of my television because I needed space for art. I can look at my art like I use to watch television. It brings much more joy and stimulation. Yes, there are galleries in this world ( Berlin, New York City- and other cities to which I haven't been) where you don't even get a warm greeting. And for those galleries you have to either give them a second chance or write them off. No I'm not wealthy, but I love art, I love to speak with artists whose work I enjoy and I like to learn about art. I like to see the progression of an artist and their work over time. And yes galleries will work with you on payment terms- ask, it is a yes or no question but it has to be posed. And about prices; I don't look at prices until I think I'm interested in buying. Then it is a question of do I think it is worth the price, can I make payments, should I buy it? All pieces in my collection are under 5 $figures$. I have a short list of pieces above 5 figures which I would like to own, but don't because I lack the funds or haven't talked terms with the gallery. Sometimes I wait and think about an art piece too long and another art lover buys it. Then the decision has been made and I look forward to other pieces which I may fall in love with. Seattle has affordable art and great galleries. My favs are G.Gibson, Greg Kucera and Davidson. -MWD, art custodian
42
@Aaron Rutten, I'm sorry if I'm coming off rude, but as an artist who is frustrated with living and trying to sell in Seattle, I have to admit that I don't think you are an artist, your an illustrator and there's a big difference! I looked at your work, and frankly, the kind of work you do is the kind of work that REAL artists would consider the work of a sellout! Any decent artist can do what you do and sell it! Try making real art and then sell it, then you'll earn the respect of other artists! If I had to make the kind of art that you do in order to sell, I would quit making art! Again, I'm not trying to be rude, I'm just responding honestly to your comments about selling or not selling art in Seattle!
43
Dear Jen, I'm a visual artist who has chosen to live within her means and work in a Pioneer Square studio that I can afford. Not too large, no windows yet, but I am visited by 200+ viewers each month.

When I am fortunate enough to have good sales, I buy art and choose to re-invest it in others. They are my community and the fabric of Pioneer Square.

Please, even if you are unable to purchase a piece of work, inquire about why we painted what we did, how we choose supplies, our story. Listen to what inspires us. Ask the Gallery owners and engage them. We want you to know about our work.

For those of you who have chosen to support me for the past 6 years, I thank you. Your investment is paying off as a journal is featuring me in 2013. Barb/MMNstudios
44
The STRANGER could host and heavily promote twice a year studio shows if in fact buying art and supporting artists is the goal.
45
Thanks Jen for a really sweet article here.
46
Nice article, Jen. As an artist, seeing prices helps me gauge how much to charge for my work. As well, the mindset of the current generation seems removed from past conventions regarding art's value. The playing field of aesthetic knowledge, experience and taste is more level and the average person can find emotional attachment in many works at almost any price point.
47
Hi Jen-
I enjoyed this article and agree with just about every word you say. My family opened a small neighborhood gallery "Alki Arts" on Alki Beach 2 1/2 years ago- we represent local artists and one out of towner with locally themed art. We have been pretty successful opening while other places were closing by selling affordable, accessible art that people seem to love. We welcome artists, families, and 'well behaved' pets...basically no one is made to feel foolish or unwelcome in our space.
We now have spread out to a temporary 'pop up' space at the foot of the Harbor Steps on Western. We sell a good amount of art because we post the prices, we make people feel welcomed, the art is talented, and people can afford it... We invite you to stop by.
Our philosophy is that art is for everyone and everyone that walks in matters. (I had previously worked in other galleries and know how cold they can be.) Thanks for spreading the love-Diane V
48
I like your general idea of buying what you like and what you can afford. When in the military and moving frequently, my wife and I decided to create a tradition of buying a painting by a local artist at every place we lived. We now, after many years, have a collection that we love and that fills our home. None were what one would call overly expensive, except for the Dali lithograph, but some have appreciated over time. Even so there are no thoughts of selling. They have become family,

Retired Colonel and father of Seattle area artist.
49
It's unfortunate that some people think that digital art is not "real art." Lamont, I'm sorry that you aren't enjoying the level of success you'd like in Seattle, but nowadays you have to work hard to get what you want.

Insulting me and my artwork just makes you look ignorant. If you don't think I am a real artist, that's fine with me. I'm sorry if my statement offended you or anyone else, but I make a good point. -- You can't just make art and expect it to sell its self. You have to be open to trying new things if you want to get ahead.

If you think you're better than everyone else because you use oil paints or whatever materials, it's that lame-ass pretentious attitude that turns people off to buying art. Take that stick (or paintbrush) out of your ass and maybe people will be more comfortable buying your work.

- Aaron Rutten www.youtube.com/anatomyofrockthe
50
yep seattle is terrible on buying art...when i moved here from AUSTIN,TX i heard all the hype over the years about how innovative and top shelf seattle was and how well rounded. i havent seen the well rounded part yet.i and my other half are artists too. we get lots of window shoppers but very few buyers...but saying"thats a nice painting" to us doesnt pay the bills or put money in our pockets. i deeply respect all good artists..who work hard at their craft and the only huuuuuge complaint i have about seattle is the art buying sucks ass...i totallly agree that people need to start checking out allllll the artists...and not just the ones in the galleries...but also the ones outside the galleries...theres lots of interesting stuff around...we artists dont care about whether we make a big sale..even though it would be nice...but just a sale...any sale is good...if anybody wants to check out our stuff...find us at www.fremontheightsart.com take care artists and keep at it....
51
@ArronRutten, more than a year has past and this is the first time I'm reading this article once again. I said some harsh things about your art at that time and I feel terrible about that! I should not have said those things! That was totally uncalled for by me! And for that, if it's not too late, I apologize! Hopefully you'll see this!
52
All the really interesting artists are outside the gallery.artists here need to be far more aggressive at marketing.my partner and I do pretty good.I know I make more in a month than Amazon employee do in a year. I don't bother with galleries or reps. It's true that people here do need to not be afraid to interact and wheel and deal with the artists themselves instead of going through galleries or middle men..plus people need to go back to checking out Craig's list again. Buyers would be amazed at what they find.