This is where I was pussy-grabbed last September. Hundreds of people have experienced similar assaults all over Seattle in the last four years. Sydney Brownstone

It was a warm and sunny day in September when Stranger city hall reporter Heidi Groover and I went for a walk outside our Capitol Hill office. We were talking when we saw a man approach us from the opposite direction.

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When I'm alone on the street, I usually keep my earbuds in my ears. Usually, but not always, this prevents men from speaking to me. I also lower my eyes. This avoids eye contact that a man might interpret as an invitation to speak to me or touch me. As an additional safety measure, if I'm wearing a coat with pockets, I grip my keys between my knuckles. Many women do this. My logic: If I have to fight, at least he'll get bloodied.

But on that September day, while walking with Heidi, I was doing none of these things. And when the man took up more space than usual by striding down the middle of the sidewalk, I forced myself to keep walking straight ahead. Maybe have a little faith in humanity, I thought. Maybe don't assume the worst.

Wrong impulse. It happened in a matter of seconds. The man reached around behind me, up, under my shapeless, shift dress (I wasn't wearing tights), and grabbed my ass. His fingers touched me through my underwear. And then he laughed.

WHO THE FUCK DO YOU THINK YOU ARE, I shouted. He laughed again. YOU FUCKING PIECE OF SHIT, I said as he sauntered down the street. He kept walking at a leisurely pace.

I was enraged, but also paralyzed. A bystander unloading a truck next to the sidewalk asked me what happened. I told her. "Oh, I'm sorry," she said and kept unloading her truck.

Based on the reported statistics in the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, 44 percent of women and 23 percent of men will experience sexual violence other than rape in their lifetimes. This includes unwanted sexual contact, like the "pussy grabbing" that Donald Trump bragged about to Billy Bush on the now-infamous Access Hollywood video from 2005. But even though multiple women have now come forward to accuse Donald Trump of this kind of behavior—and share their own assault stories—our country is only beginning to reckon with its culture of male entitlement. More women than we'd like to acknowledge have experienced unwanted sexual contact, and often at such an early age that their knowledge of their own bodies is invariably wrapped up in what it's like to have it violated without their consent.

It goes without saying that this happens even in "progressive" enclaves like Seattle. So not long after my latest groping incident, I wondered: How often does groping actually get reported to police?

Move your mouse over this chart to see more detail:

To get an answer, I requested data. What I received from the Seattle Police Department was 68 pages documenting every public urinator, masturbator, and groper over the last four years, as well as anything related to those categories, including child molestation. But I wanted to know specifically about groping—unwanted sexual contact between adults. So I stripped out the incident categories that included children, people exposing themselves, sex in public, prostitution, and other unrelated events. That left me with assaults that police ultimately labeled as "lewd conduct" or "molestings." (Molesting, in this scenario, refers only to unwanted sexual contact between adults.)

With that done, I'd arrived at my best approximation for reported gropings in Seattle between January 2012 and September 2015. You can click on each one of these incidents on the interactive map for a brief explanation of where each incident happened, how it was classified, and what police did to follow up.

Every dot represents a violation:

Based on my number crunching, it appears that during this 45-month period, the city averaged about nine reported gropes or other forms of assault and unwanted sexual contact per month. Overall, reports of such incidents appear to have decreased somewhat in recent years, but that doesn't tell us much because (a) we're only dealing with reported incidents here and (b) the SPD has been inconsistent about how it's labeled these types of events, although in recent years it's been making efforts to be more consistent.

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Still, with the city's increased density, why would groping numbers appear to fall at all? Could it be that actual gropings are decreasing or just the reports of them? Or perhaps the SPD's move toward more accurate reporting has also shifted some molesting reports into the higher-level "rape" categories? It's almost impossible to know.

Here's what we definitely do know: Even our progressive, deep-blue city is full of Donald Trumps.