THURSDAY 11/23

THE PULSES, THE SPITS, RIGHT ON!
(Vogue) Now that you done spent enough time over-eatin' butter-soaked "American" delicacies and havin' tedious fellowship with yer worn-out kin, it's gotta be time to get to gettin' it on... RIGHT? Hell yes. And where better than the Vogue.... I guarantee this evenin'll be more action-packed than yer stale celebration of "thanks"! Dig, the lineup consists of the power-pop stylin' of the Pulses, the groovin' get-down pound of Right On!, and a bit of cheeky abandonment, de la punk, from the Spits. Like, what more could you want after an afternoon of ol' uncle Arnie squeezin' up yer squeeze up-ables--well, 'sides another drink! MIKE NIPPER


FRIDAY 11/24

DAMIEN JURADO, SONGS: OHIA, STRADHOUGHTON ECHO
(Paradox) Damien Jurado is remarkable: After the hostile reception to his terrible first record he came back and put out one of the best local releases of last year, and his new, stranger album, Ghost of David (Sub Pop), is complex enough that it might be even better, but will take some time to reveal itself fully. Jurado works wonders with the simplest acoustic chords, writing mostly sad ballads, the rare, perfect pop song, and some fierce punk hoedowns. In front of a band he is unstoppable. Songs: OHIA recorded a great single with Will Oldham's Palace Records, so they're gonna be lo-fi and weird. The Paradox is a real temple of DIY, the city's most vital crucible at this moment. I can't find anyone who has seen a less-than-thrilling show there, besides those canceled due to low attendance. Go early and often. GRANT COGSWELL

ZEKE, HOG MOLLY, THE CATHETERS, MILHAUS
(Crocodile) Zeke is straight-up rock and roll; Hog Molly, Tad's band, is frightening, great METAL; the Catheters are one of the finest and most entertaining live rock bands in Seattle; and Milhaus, well, you'll just have to see them, since I never have. This will be a very fun show if you're in the mood to get drunk and be pummeled by power chords. JEFF DeROCHE

THE CRIPPLES, THE BAD GIRLS
(Lock & Keel) The Cripples are a new-wave punk quartet from Seattle that features The Stranger's own Allie Holly-Gottlieb on drums, and a fine drummer she is. The band boasts giddy finger-action by frontman Ross Marshall, who plays one of them hand-held keyboards (a key-tar) as well as sings. If you like your punk rock toned and tightened, or if you like your new wave extra energetic, then this is the show for you. JEFF DeROCHE

MARTIN SEXTON
(King Cat Theater) Watching Martin Sexton perform is SO FUCKING EXHAUSTING. And I mean that in the best possible way. In just one set, you're liable to get the full range of his soulful, folksy-bluesy, sweaty vocal schizophrenia: wailing falsetto, deep rumbling, scatting, occasional yodeling, and even his crazy, uncanny trumpet imitation... and all the while, he's playing guitar and singing his own smart lyrics about being restless and in love. Sexton can't decide whether he wants to be Otis Redding or Van Morrison or Hank Williams, so he becomes everybody all at once, and it really works. MIN LIAO

THE BRIEFS, NEW TOWN ANIMALS, NITROUS FOXIDE
(Sunset Tavern) Dear Briefs: We give and we give and we give. First came our glowing recommendations. Then came the recent CD release party that WE SPONSORED, because we love your beautiful punk rock. We spot you at the Cha-Cha every night, where you tell us over and over again that you will bring us a copy of your (gorgeous, we're certain) new CD. We're not writing anything else about you until we get it. In fact, to our readers, do not attend this sure-to-be excellent show. THE STRANGER MUSIC SECTION

POPDEFECT, GAS HUFFER, ROCK*A*TEENS
(Breakroom) See Saturday listing.

JUMBALAYA
(Baltic Room) Sometime in the middle of the 700 Club's yes-no-maybe shutdown this summer, the club informed its regular acts that they had to find gigs somewhere else. In the ensuing melee, Jumbalaya, a collective of "Seattle soul" singers and musicians, signed a contract with the Baltic Room, and, despite grousing from the Denny Triangle faithful, remained on Capitol Hill even after the 700 Club got a stay of execution. Now, months later, the plate tectonics of the Seattle club scene don't seem so evil after all--the Baltic Room has expanded and now serves real drinks, and Capitol Hill has gained a Friday night live music venue that for once is absolutely untainted by prog rock, psychobilly, or any of the other bastard children of rock. NATHAN THORNBURGH

THEE HEATHEN, THEE OLD CODGERS
(Rainbow) Danny Barnes is the buzz-cut hero who fronts these two incredible bands. The evening will begin with a set by Thee Old Codgers, a bluegrass trio, which features Barnes on the banjo and Jon Parry on the violin. Thee Heathen, a quartet with Barnes on electric guitar and Dan Tyack on the pedal steel, cranks out roots rock with late-'60s punk overtones. You'll hear original tunes as well as covers of the MC5, among others. With both bands you'll find catchy tunes captained by a killer bandleader who will lean forward and charge the appointed soloist, driving his cohort into a hard-lined eloquence. KREG HASEGAWA

WEARY, RURAL PICTURES, LOWER 48, STRAW DOGS
(Tractor Tavern) Weary's gloriously mellow strumming creates harmonies that warm a guy's soul while he listens, crying into his beer. But by now, we all know that modern-day acoustic country shouldn't always be about depression. If it's going to have a following (and Weary do have a following), at times it's got to be about movement, something Weary are particularly apt at generating. Their rhythms often get the most sullen of Seattle crowds to shake it all, and their acoustic guitar work is rich and textured. Backed by a solid rhythm section, Weary are the most complete-sounding mellow twang outfit I know. They are a truly beautiful band. CHARLES REDELL


SATURDAY 11/25

MURDER CITY DEVILS, THE BRIEFS, THE GLORY HOLES
(EMP) By now, you know this paper is disposed to praising the Murder City Devils. I don't like heavy genre referencing and revivalism: I hated Mudhoney, who could as easily have toured as Iggy-mania. MCD are only a little guilty of some of the same thing, but they openly cop to it. They also brought showmanship and style back when neither could be found around these parts. They have good songs and a sharp, self-effacing sense of humor, which they apply fearlessly to a serious passion for showing the crowd a good time, while making something primal within it stand up on all fours. A rock show in the Sky Church is like, well, seeing a rock show in a museum. However, the sound system alone is simply the clearest and most amazing you have ever heard--a rare instance in which throwing a lot of cash at something makes it better. MCD might even use all that crazy lighting to good effect. This should be really exciting. GRANT COGSWELL

POPDEFECT, GIRL TROUBLE, AIEEE!
(Breakroom) In their nearly 20-year career, Popdefect has managed to remain almost completely obscure everywhere except Seattle and L.A. In a typically well-timed career move, the boys moved to L.A. to "make it big" just before the grunge music scene exploded here. Some may remember the brilliant tour documentary Live With This, which chronicled the painful reality of a small, independent band on tour. Yet despite obscurity, drunkeness, and just plain bad luck, Popdefect maintained the same three members throughout its career, as well as their sense of humor. Don't miss your last chance to see one of the greatest bands to ever come out of Seattle. Tacoma legends Girl Trouble and art-noise rockers AIEEE! round out this amazing event. JOEY ZERO

THEE HEATHEN, THEE OLD CODGERS
(Rainbow) See Friday listing.

RUBBERNECK
(Central Saloon) In the ongoing drive to convince Seattleites to brave the Pioneer Square insanity and go hear Rubberneck play at the Central Saloon, it should be made clear that Rubberneck are not hippies. Sure, they've played the Bite of Seattle, Bite of Portland, and Bite of Salem. And your fuzzy logic is correct if you remember seeing them at the High Times Festival, the Seattle Hemp Extravaganza, the Cannabis Carnival, and even a 1996 Al Gore campaign stop. But the group that High Times magazine called "one band under a stoney groove" are more than just another bug-eyed weed tribute band. In fact, the group, founded eight years ago in Portland by Chilean brothers Pablo and Ricardo Ojeda, are all funk and Latin and very little Wavy Gravy. Singer Pablo lets adrenaline guide him; as a result, he sounds like Reggie Watts without the barbiturate laxness. The rest of the band follow suit, and the payoff, despite their hazy past, is a band that are simply tighter and less dilated than the competition. NATHAN THORNBURGH

DONALD GLAUDE, A GUY CALLED GERALD
(Showbox) From his late '80s turn in acid house, producing club smashes with the likes of 808 State, to his seminal drum 'n' bass release Black Secret Technology in 1995 and beyond, Mancunian Gerald Simpson has remained a tireless traveler on the beat highway--taking some interesting detours down Electro Avenue and Detroit Drive along the way. The year 2000 finds him, after a five-year lull, still cruising along in the Black Secret lane, albeit at a somewhat kinder, gentler pace. Female vocalists--from Lamb's Louise Rhodes to the Deee-Lite-ful Lady Miss Kier--on his latest, Essence, are a welcome warm breath on the frosty surface of Gerald's d'n'b planet, though the album still retains a spacy cool that may make it tough for some to cozy up to. New material aside, disciples of dance music would be foolish to miss a session with the man who became an innovative player in so many subgenres, and whose trail of releases as both DJ, collaborator, and producer are a virtual Cliffs Notes history of the scene. LEAH GREENBLATT

IT'S STILL LIKE THAT with RABBIT IN THE MOON, PHIFE, GREEN VELVET, DJ RECTANGLE, HUMATE, TAYLOR, ADAM F, J MAJIK, & MORE
(Stadium Exhibition Center) Techno kookster Green Velvet has been called "dance music's answer to Kool Keith," and indeed, mild-mannered Chicago house impresario Curtis Jones (a.k.a. Cajmere) does quite the Dr. Octagon flip when he becomes Velvet--turning out fiendishly clever, I-skipped-my-meds-today narratives set against the dark, driving funk of spare studio beats. But whereas Keith seems to fall farther down the rabbit hole with each successive alter ego, Jones retains a sly humor that makes first-person confessions about obsessive peepers ("The Stalker") and reincarnation as a dewdrop ("Water Molecule") a lot less disconcerting than they could be. His stuff is prime don't-try-this-at-home dance floor material, so catch him live if you can--and perhaps bring him a little Paxil care package while you're at it. LEAH GREENBLATT


SUNDAY 11/26

A MAGIC SCIENCE: CELEBRATING JIMI HENDRIX
(Benaroya Hall) This is a show that any fan of Jimi Hendrix and what he did with music should not miss. It's a conglomeration of the some of the world's celebrated musicians and visual artists (Medeski, Martin & Wood, Vernon Reid, Chris Whitley, and jazz singers Sandra St. Victor and Marc Anthony Thompson, among others) playing Hendrix's music. The performers featured at this event have all picked up musically where Jimi left off, and are expanding their genres in ways that would have made him proud. I have no idea what this will sound like, but reports from the only other performance (in New York) of this event have been good. I know that Jimi's blues roots have been relied on heavily, but I'm sure we will see some of his music reinvented in strange ways (tablas playing the blues guarantee it), but that is exactly what one should expect from anything having to do with Hendrix. CHARLES REDELL


MONDAY 11/27

UZ JSME DOMA, WELCOME, AVEO
(Graceland) Seattle's pre-winter run of fantastic shows continues tonight with a bill full, top to bottom, of essential music. Opener Aveo structure their songs into complex layers of sound--deeply rhythmic, captivating, collapsing plateaus. Welcome humbly offer their souls through simply constructed, honest, and unforgettable pop songs; they hide in the shadows and dark corners of Seattle's music scene, but are one of the more perfect examples of what this city is capable of. Uz Jsme Doma are pop avant-gardists, and hail from the Czech Republic. They've been together for 15 years, and are in the states for their 10th U.S. tour. They've survived this long by creating a musical blend of traditional Czech folk music and modern guitar rock. The result is a bizarre concoction of distorted chords, manic horns, and nervous rhythms. If this is the kind of show we may expect from the dark months to come, then I say bring the rain and the cold, it's going to be a beautiful winter. MARK DUSTON


TUESDAY 11/28

Today there is no music.


WEDNESDAY 11/29

ROCKARADIA with HELL'S BELLES, VANDEMONIUM, PINK CHIHUAHUA, THE STUCK-UPS, TIGER ZANE
(Crocodile) Only a few weeks after anti-abortion henchmen from the ultra-conservative James Madison Center for Free Speech arrived in Florida to help George W. Bush steal the election from the pro-choice majority, Seattle's own Aradia Women's Health Center fights back with its own brutish revelry. Their five-band blowout fundraiser features Hell's Belles, an all-female AC/DC cover band more than happy to strap it on for a good cause. After all, even in communist King County, Aradia is one of only a few clinics providing abortion care, and the only clinic that provides it in an unabashedly feminist atmosphere. So go to the Croc. Like Bon Scott sang in "Highway to Hell": "Ain't nothing I'd rather do/Goin' down/Party time/My friends are gonna be there too." If that's not a reproductive-rights battle cry, I don't know what is. NATHAN THORNBURGH

Support The Stranger