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Alexis Rinck, 22
Amaury Ávalos, 28
Grad students, University of Washington

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What brings you out here today?

A large reason is that much of feminist movement has been led in the interests of white, straight women. Rinck: My main reason for being out here today is to advocate for black and brown women, indigenous women, and trans-women. Really the women who seem to be forgotten by the mainstream feminist movement.

How are you feeling about the march so far?
Ávalos: It feels good to be here and amplify voices that haven't been heard. But, in some ways, I'm here with a sense of critique. I'd like to see more women of color's voices at the forefront.

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Michael Roybal, 53
Air Force Veteran, Seattle born and raised

Can you tell me about your sign?
I’m a former air force veteran, I served in many foreign wars, swore to give my life for this country. Also my family are second generation immigrants to the country. So the idea of liberty means a lot to me. The cost of freedom is eternal vigilance.

Katie Barry, Clara Guyot, and Kira Augustamar stand with their handmade signs.
Katie Barry, Clara Guyot, and Kira Augustamar stand with their handmade signs. NG

Katie Barry, 15
Clara Guyot, 15
Kira Augustamar, 15
High school freshmen

What brings you out here today?
Augustamar: There’s a lot of people who don’t understand what people are fighting for and we have to show them what it’s all about

Guyot: We’re all high school freshman, so we’re the new generation of kids. We’ve got to start make a difference by supporting each other.

Can you tell me about your signs?

Augustamar: I drew mine because my dad’s a Haitian immigrant. I wanted to raise awareness that Haiti is not a shithole. Also that black lives matter. That's important to me.

Guyot: I believe all women are beautiful no matter what. Frida Kahlo embraced that. I want to spread that message today.

Barry: I wrote Miss Frizzle because I watched a lot of "Magic School Bus" growing up when I was little. I also want to support scientists and women scientists. I want to be a scientist one day.

Katie Bowman, Jasmine Henderson, Genesis Williamson, and Kat Lopez-Johnson are all freshmen at Seattle University.
Katie Bowman, Jasmine Henderson, Genesis Williamson, and Kat Lopez-Johnson are all freshmen at Seattle University. NG

Katie Bowman, 18
Jasmine Henderson, 18
Genesis Williamson, 18
Kat Lopez-Johnson, 18.

Tell me about your sign.

Lopez-Johnson: Rape culture is a very prevalent issue and I have been a personal victim and so have many of my friends. It applies to many people and it’s straight to the point. Stop victim-blaming because it’s not the victim’s fault and rape culture perpetuates that.

What do you think about the current resistance movement going on against sexual assault?

Lopez-Johnson: I think to a certain extent it’s progress but it’s a lot of certain progress. It’s not visible in everyday life.

Williamson: Yeah, like this goes way deeper than Hollywood.

Do you feel like we're headed toward a more all encompassing type of progress?

Lopez-Johnson: I'd like to think so.

Bowman: What we're doing is we're forcing people to think about it.

Lopez-Johnson: Yeah, I think it's going to be slow. Stuff like this is just one notch in the gears for the train we need to hurtle down the track. We're starting to get those gears to move forward.

Kiersten Meyers (left) and CharDae Ross (right) were marching for intersectionality.
Kiersten Meyers (left) and CharDae Ross (right) were marching for intersectionality. NG

Kiersten Meyers, 25
Student teacher at UW Tacoma
CharDae Ross, 24
an account manager

Can you explain your sign to me?

Ross: Essentially what it means to me is the intersectionality of feminism. Black women, Asian women, Hispanic Women, everyone, they need to be a part of the conversation.

Meyers: If there are women who support the ideas of feminism they can't forget about women of color, trans women, and everything in between. If they don't support them then they're contributing to white supremacy. It's just a reminder to be inclusive.

Ross: It's opening the door for everyone. It's making that seat at the table for everyone, even for people with different ideas than us. How can we affect change if we're not willing to see differences.

How do you feel about the march today?

Ross: I think it's great. I think it's important to step up and step out. I think it's important to show up.

Do you think we're moving toward positive change?

Ross: I certainly hope so. If we can't hope then what are we trying for.

Jordan Robson and Isabelle Bertges are both members of Femen USA.
Jordan Robson and Isabelle Bertges are both members of Femen USA. NG

Jordan Robson, 29
Head of Femen USA
Isabelle Bertges, 20
Feminactivist

How does it feel to be out here today?

Robson: It feels powerful to be here. It's only going to get bigger and louder.

Bertges: It feels like we're all united. It's great to see that you're not alone.