With help from Dave Sitek, Pussy Riot give their anti-Russian agit-pop an industrial-lite makeover on Bad Apples.
With help from Dave Sitek, Pussy Riot give their anti-Russian agit-pop an industrial-lite makeover on "Bad Apples." Sacha Lecca

Pussy Riot + Dave Sitek, "Bad Apples" (Pussy Riot). Russia's most famous agit-pop troupe and TV on the Radio's producer link up for a concise, emphatic industrial-lite anthem. The Riot grrrlz rail against nefarious shit like "killer cops, hatred, the death machine, corruption, damn fools drunk on power"—you know, all those nutritious elements that Trumputin champion, embody, or at least condone. "You would not act like this in front of your kids/NO!" Pussy Riot scold, and sources within the White House and Kremlin are whispering that Trumputin feel duly chastened. (Pussy Riot perform tonight at Vera Project.)

Aïsha Devi, "Dislocation of the Alpha" (Houndstooth). On "Dislocation of the Alpha," Swiss producer Aïsha Devi achieves the difficult feat of creating a track that's at once ethereal and gravid. There's an amorphous sense of menace in the dank air, as if Tricky circa Maxinquaye were collaborating with Hyperdub mainman Kode9. Devi's voice carries Tricky's languid dread while above her a cloudy dirge throbs amid doomy bass drops and scattershot percussion. It's a masterpiece of ominous suggestion, a subtle lethal weapon that exists in its own (under)world. This track comes off Devi's second album, DNA Feelings (out May 11).

DJ Nigga Fox, “WAABA-JAH” (Warp). Straight outta Lisbon, Portugal, DJ Nigga Fox has been among the leading producers from that hotbed of electronic-music innovation, recording primarily for the renowned Príncipe label. He's revered for his thrilling fusions of techno/house with Angolan styles like kuduro, batida, and kizomba. Making the leap to electronic-music world-leader Warp Records with his new Crânio EP, Fox is poised to go supernova. “WAABA-JAH” is an odd, oblong specimen of dance music—raw, chunky, wild, and laced with freaky high frequencies that will have dancers thrusting their arms skyward with reckless abandon. The track exemplifies Fox's predilection for party music that torches the status quo while making you wonder how in blazes he concocted this crazy menagerie of sounds. Surely, right this moment, Diplo's figuring out a way to repackage this music to the douche-y masses.

Kaori Suzuki, "Audabe" (Sounds et al). I know it's a bit arrogant to foist a 19-minute experimental-electronic instrumental track on readers, especially on a Friday. But bear with me and please summon your staunchest attention span. Former Seattle synthesist/instrument-builder Kaori Suzuki (now based in Oakland) is one of the best academic composers in the country at generating long-form pieces that rivet and then blow your mind with a few scrupulously chosen tones and modulations. "Audabe" is a pulsating Möbius strip of what her label calls "mirrored signals from analog oscillators, creating changing pattern variations and stereo effects from their respective idiosyncratic signal paths." The results make you feel as if your ears have become op-art paintings and are somehow hypnotizing themselves. Maybe that makes as much sense as the dense flurries of snow falling outside my window as I type (it's technically spring, right?), but listen and you'll hear what I mean. It's the damnedest thing. "Audabe" can be found on Suzuki's album, Newsun, out now on CD and download.

Tarkamt, "Et Sic in Infinitum" (Doom Trip). Tarkamt is the solo project of Egyptian musician Cherif El-Masri, who plays guitar with the Invisible Hands, a wayward rock group fronted by former Seattle-based, Sun City Girls legend Alan Bishop. On El-Masri's new LP, Live at the Necropolis (not a live recording, actually), he covers a lot of strange ground—tribal psychedelia, abstract electronica, brutal jazz, noise—with a fierce boldness and not a trace of dilettantism. "Et Sic in Infinitum" begins as a seething cauldron of drum-machine-powered spy-film rock that blasts off into the astral-jazz stratosphere when Bishop (who's now based in Cairo) blows rancorously into his alto saxophone and the bubbling static swells and swirls to a turbulent extended climax. Imagine the Barry Adamson/Pharoah Sanders/Einstürzende Neubauten collab of your dreams—and then buy this blessed album.

Noteworthy March 23 album releases: Jack White, Boarding House Reach (Columbia/Third Man); Cavern of Anti-Matter, Hormone Lemonade (Duophonic); Erika Wennerstrom, Sweet Unknown (Partisan); Toni Braxton, Sex & Cigarettes (Def Jam); Guided by Voices, Space Gun (Guided by Voices, Inc.); Mark Pritchard, The Four Worlds (Warp); Preoccupations, New Material (Jagjaguwar); Bonny Doon, Longwave (Woodsist); The Sword, Used Future (Razor & Tie); Jeff Rosenstock, Post- (Polyvinyl); Miles Davis/John Coltrane, The Final Tour: The Bootleg Series, Vol. 6 (Columbia); Black Milk, Fever (Mass Appeal); Courtney Marie Andrews, May Your Kindness Remain (Fat Possum/Mama Bird); The Monochrome Set, Eligible Bachelors [Deluxe Edition] (Cherry Red); Entourage, Ceremony of Dreams: Studio Sessions and Outtakes 1972-1977 (Tompkins Square); The Pandoras, Hey! It's the Pandoras (Burger); The Messthetics, The Messthetics (Dischord).