Kim Schriers still winning. Longs still losing.
Kim Schrier (right) is still winning. Long (left) is still losing.

In the latest ballot drop from King County, Democrat Kim Schrier, who’s hoping to hand Republican Dino Rossi his fourth devastating loss in her bid for Washington’s 8th Congressional District, widened the gap between them to 13,353 votes. She now leads Rossi by 6.4 points—53.2 to 46.8.

Schrier established a solid 6-point lead in the district after the ballot drop on election night, beating Rossi by over 12,000 votes. In this latest drop, Rossi did improve his take of the vote in King County by a smidgen, but it's nothing threatening.

Election officials in Kittitas, Chelan, and Douglas won’t release any more ballots until Friday around 4:00 p.m., and Pierce County won’t drop until 6:00 p.m. today. There are about 24,000 ballots left be counted in Pierce, 10,700 left to count in Chelan, and 7,000 left to count in Kittitas. Schrier is likely to maintain her share of the votes in all those counties as ballots roll in, so she should be safe unless shit somehow goes extremely south in Pierce. *Update* Pierce is in, and shit has not gone extremely south. Schrier maintains a 6-point lead.

Schrier’s camp remains as confident as they were on election night, saying in an e-mail today that they see “no realistic path for Rossi to overtake Schrier in the remaining ballot returns.”

Meanwhile, Democrat Carolyn Long’s chances of beating three-term Republican incumbent Jaime Herrera Beutler are darkening. *Update, 6:50 pm* Today the Congresswoman expanded her lead by two points. Herrera Beutler now leads by 6, with 13,000 votes separating them.

*Update 6:55* The AP calls Washington’s 3rd for Herrera Beutler.

Long concedes. “What we’ve built on this campaign is greater than one person—it’s a movement of folks from all over Southwest Washington that cannot and will not end with this election.” said Long in a press release. “We ran a civil campaign that I can look back on with pride knowing that we stayed focused on the issues that matter to people in my district.”

In the legislature, the state Senate race between Mona Das and Joe Fain is close and getting closer.

Incumbent Republican Fain is only 90 votes ahead of Das, according to the Tuesday afternoon vote totals. Fain’s lead is down from last night, when he was leading his Democrat challenger by 274 votes.

We’re probably going to have to wait until every last vote is counted to know who will win this race in Auburn’s 47th Legislative District. There are still about 14,000 votes left to be counted in that legislative district, according to King County Elections’ Kendall Hodson.

“This is an estimate, so we’ll still receive some ballots in the mail tomorrow and we also have some ballots with a signature challenge that still need to be resolved. We have counted 45,000 in that district we think there is about 14,000 left, which is our best estimate,” Hodson said.

Hodson said most of the ballots dropped off on Tuesday will be counted and released in tomorrow’s vote update.

“Tomorrow’s results will be a lot bigger than today’s so we will see a lot more shake out tomorrow,” Hodson said.

Das told The Stranger she was feeling hopeful today watching the returns slant in her favor.

“We’re super optimistic. We know Democrats vote late and we’re really excited and we can’t wait to see the results tomorrow,” Das said.

Das said late returns in the primary favored her as well.

In September, Candace Faber accused Fain of raping her in a Washington, D.C., hotel room in 2007. Fain denies the allegation and has called for an investigation, but one does not appear to be forthcoming. The Washington Post said he is one of over a dozen state lawmakers that are currently running for reelection across the country.

Finally, the carbon fee is losing by 12.2 percent, insignificantly tightening from 12.6 percent last night. The Stranger's Nathalie Graham says the initiative is "probably dead in our rapidly warming waters." *Update* The Seattle Times reports that reps for the carbon fee have conceded.

The measure to prevent the rest of the state from adopting soda taxes is winning by 9.24 points. So, all of that is still bad.