Hes in.
He's in, and he's running on civility. U.S. CONGRESS

Late last year Rep. Denny Heck basically said his political opponent's popularity on Twitter and the incivility of public discourse had driven him into retirement, where he would focus on writing novels and "spending time with his family."

But now the undeniably—almost pornographically—attractive role of Washington State Lieutenant Governor opening up last month has proved too tempting for the outgoing representative of Washington's 10th Congressional District, who announced on Thursday his desire to join the increasingly horny race for Lt. Gov.

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Heck is running on "civility, decency and experience to get things done," citing his years as a representative in the statehouse and his four terms in Congress serving a district that was specially drawn for him to win. State Sen. Marko Liias, who announced two weeks ago and secured current Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib's endorsement yesterday, is running as "the most progressive candidate in the race." State Sen. Steve Hobbs is running as the only candidate who can manage to disappoint everyone at the same time, including mother nature, while also trying to make history as the first Level 65 Necromancer to serve as Lt. Gov. since 1897, when Republican F. H. Luce and his mutton chops left office.

There are also some Republicans, including failed Seattle city council candidate Ann Sattler and Joseph Brumbles, who doesn't understand how to use apostrophes and who introduces himself on his website as "an oath keeper."

The cynical read on Heck's run is that he was tired of flying back and forth to Washington D.C. as a member of Congress and wouldn't mind collecting a paycheck and playing Daddy of the State Senate in his own backyard. As the moderate with the highest name recognition, Heck's entry into the race is bad news for Hobbs and the Republicans, and probably good news for Liias, who can now occupy the more progressive lane of a race.

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