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The form angels take when greeting you at the Gates of Heaven. Or what you see when taking your shoes off in Kendall Jenner's foyer. Courtesy of Pace Gallery
I've admittedly only seen a James Turrell piece in person once—shout out to "Light Reign" at the Henry Art Gallery—but I've long yearned to see more of his lightworks in real life just to bathe in the colorful light radiating out his yonic portals. And my desire to experience a Turrell piece is somewhat quenched by Pace Gallery's free online exhibition of his Constellation series. Though the whole virtual aspect of the show feels a bit hollow.

The works are presented in "site-specific chambers" and are elliptical or circular, composed of frosted glass and LED lights. Mounted on the wall and named after—ahem—constellations, the pieces slowly and subtly shift in color on an hours-long loop that is apparently imperceptible when viewed in person. These vibe-y works are beautiful to look at online, but mostly if you curl up with your screen of choice underneath a blanket, pretending the static image presented to you is the Real Thing™.

Turrell and one of his Constellation works came up, surreally, this week when Architectural Digest featured model Kendall Jenner on its Open Door series. Jenner says she has been wanting "a James Turrell" since forever and finds the piece—called "Scorpius"—"peaceful." But Jenner strangely put the lightwork in her foyer, where the light from the bright California sun competes with Scorpius's womb-like light, the exact wrong place to put it.

In a darker setting, the pink light is transcendent, but in Jenner's white-walled villa, that pink makes everything look sickly. What was once a portal to a meditative state or “spaces within space" as Turrell calls it, now becomes a vapid accoutrement to a celebrity's boring home; another example of how rich people don't know how to spend money.

In any case, you can view James Turrell's Constellation series sans Jenner at Pace Gallery's online viewing room until August 14.