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The Sick House
The Sick House Bill Chizek/gettyimages.com

Biden Tested Negative for COVID-19: He took the test because for 90 minutes he stood on the same stage with a man who is not much into face masks and who tested positive for COVID-19 on the first day of October, 2020.

This man's wife also has the virus. And so does his senior counselor. Not long ago, this man called the virus a hoax. This man is also the 45th and incumbent president of a country that reopened its economy way too soon. As a consequence, 105,000 American deaths were added to the 100,000 deaths clocked at the end of May.

A Former CEO of Godfather's Pizza: Was among those killed by the president's wishful thinking and premature opening. On June 20, he attended a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma. A month and a week later, he had pennies on his eyes. The 45th president, who is also a businessman, is reported to have "mild symptoms."

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What Are the Real Chances of Trump Going Under? Very high, says Bloomberg. "Trump is 74 years old, overweight and male, factors that put him into a higher-risk category of Covid-19 patients and thrust his health into the spotlight just a month before the U.S. election." Many of the men and women who attended his recent rallies were also old and overweight.

The Chances of Trump Recovering Are Still Very Good: But will his character change after, to use Mobb Deep's words, "getting closer to God in a tight situation?" Not likely. Recall Boris Johnson, the UK's Trump; he also got the virus and faced death for several days. But the prime minister recovered and continued being the UK's Trump.

So, It Looks Like the October Surprise: Got straight to it. Other election-season Octobers have on the main been a little more chill about dropping their surprises. Thirty-one days is plenty of time. But this October found itself in a pickle. Every month before it had lots of surprises, and often exceptional ones. To make itself known, October resolved to do something big on its first day: The man running for reelection catches the virus. Now, what will this very early surprise (which, to be honest, is not really a surprise) mean in the coming days?

The Markets:

The question that market analysts were trying to answer on Friday was whether the news President Donald Trump has contracted COVID-19 is the October surprise that will change the outlook for the election, and of course, markets.

The easiest answer is, who knows?

“Markets (being impersonal) will focus on whether this affects the election outcome or public health policy. The future presidential debates may not happen; these were not seen as especially significant. Those opposed to mask-wearing may revise their views, and the president’s experience may impact U.S. public health policy,” said Paul Donovan, chief economist at UBS global wealth management.

The Markets Also Saying This: "This surprise is making me not want to get up."


The Dow Jones dropped 200 points after opening. But this fact may tell us less about Trump's health and more about the health of the economy.


What the September Jobs Report Is Telling Us: The conventional economy, which some call the real economy—though there is much that is not real in the real economy, so it is best to call it the conventional economy—is "running out of steam." If you do not know why this was inevitable, then read the next entry of today's Slog AM.

Last Month: The US made no "progress on average daily Covid-19 cases." It will also make no progress this month and the next. The reason why the absence of any progress is very bad news is we are "entering into the challenging fall and winter seasons." So, expect not only slower economic growth in the "real economy" but a full-blown recession by the first month of the year ahead.

People Are Still Buying Cars: During the pandemic. During the wildfires. Americans.

Major automakers reported their third-quarter sales were down compared to a year ago — but far less than the substantial plunge in sales during the second quarter.
"It's coming in better than we thought," said Michelle Krebs, senior analyst with Cox Automotive.
The car offers an excellent example of what makes the real economy so unreal. The worst way to get around a city is also the dominant form of transportation in our capitalist moment. In this fact (the car's dominance) is found as much fiction as in the feverishly exchanged bonds and shares on the financial markets. This is why it's better to call the "real economy" the "conventional economy."

Maybe Blame for Trump's Terrible and Soul-Sucking Performance During the First, and Likely Last, Presidential Debate of 2020: Can be attributed to the virus?

The First Lady Got It: But what about the son of the First Lady and her septuagenarian husband, Barron? He tested negative.

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There Is Hugging: And there is hand-tugging.

Now Washington Wants to Have a "Hard Look:" At the massive tax break it granted Boeing not too long ago. But the airplane corporation not only cut thousands after receiving hard cash from our state but is now concentrating plane production in "Right to Work" South Carolina. Too late to be looking hard now; Washington can kiss that hard-earned and much-needed cash goodbye.

To Those Who Say We Should Be All Nice, Nice, and Polite Now That the President Has You Know What: You can kiss my grits.

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