A sign we can all get behind
A sign we can all get behind Chip Somodevilla / GETTY

King County's "undersheriff" will soon be its... I guess it would be oversheriff? King County executive Dow Constantine appointed Patti Cole-Tindall to replace Sheriff Mitzi Johanknecht when her term expires in January. Cole-Tindall worked as "the department’s chief of technical services for almost five years" before working as the undersheriff for 1.5 years, the Seattle Times reports. She'll be the first person of color to serve in the role.

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The Seattle City Council passed a $7.1 billion budget yesterday: Hannah shows you what's inside and catches you up on all the background drama here.

Nordstrom share prices drop 25%: The company "reported profit of $64 million for the quarter ending Oct. 30, a 21% improvement over the same quarter in 2020 but barely half of what the company earned in the third quarter in 2019," the Seattle Times reports. The store was apparently low on "women’s apparel and shoes."

More rain and flooding in the forecast: KING5 reports that "rising snow levels combined with heavier rain will cause rivers to rise, bringing the threat of flooding to western Washington between Thursday and Saturday."

Some updates on the Sawant Recall: Capitol Hill Seattle Blog reports that representatives from various organizations that worship Jehovah support the Recall. The blog also included some photos from last weekend's "F%#k The Recall" block party.

ICYMI: Proposed methane plant in Tacoma closer to reality: The state's pollution board approved the development plan for Puget Sound Energy’s Liquefied Natural Gas plant (aka the Tacoma LNG plant), The News Tribune reports. The facility will need to do "additional air monitoring," however. Tribes and environmental groups are pissed.

Missouri man released from jail after serving 42 years on a wrongful conviction: That's 15,487 days of life that the state owes Kevin Strickland, a 62-year-old man who was tossed in jail "on a hunch" from a victim's boyfriend and then selected from a line-up after cops "reportedly pressured" the woman to pick Strickland, the BBC reports. The state probably will not pay him a dime because "Missouri only compensates prisoners exonerated through DNA evidence, not because of eyewitness testimony."

Charlottesville jury tells those "Unite the Right" Nazis to pay $25 million: Nine people who James Fields injured when he drove a car into a crowd of protesters and killed Heather Heyer sued a bunch of Nazis and other white power organizations and figureheads "for violence motivated by racial, religious or ethnic animosity," and they won $25 million. Among those held responsible: Richard Spencer, Jason Kessler, and Christopher Cantwell. "Lawyers for the far-right organizers said they would seek to reduce those amounts, and there was little chance that their clients could pay in any event," the New York Times reports.

Speaking of: The "good people on both sides" guy might be back earlier than expected:

Another death in Waukesha: An 8-year-old in the Christmas parade didn't make it, Politico reports. Prosecutors charged Darrell Brooks Jr. "with five counts of intentional homicide" today, and now it looks like they'll add a sixth.

Yemen death toll expected to rise to 377,000 by next month, Al Jazeera reports. The U.S. is complicit in those deaths because we maintain the planes Saudi Arabia uses to bomb the country and enforce an economically devastating blockade that has led to the worst humanitarian crisis in the world. Biden said he'd stop selling the Saudis weapons, but that was just him saying shit.

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The #vanlife boyfriend shot himself in the head, according to the attorney for Brian Laundrie, who was a "person of interest" in the murder of Gabby Petito, CNN reports.

Grammy noms dropped: The Seattle Symphony earned its 26th nomination for Strauss: Also Sprach Zarathustra; Scriabin: The Poem of Ecstasy in the Best Orchestral Performance category. If they end up bringing home that golden gramophone, they'll place it next to their five others. Incidentally, the rock categories this year look absolutely dismal. How long have they been this dismal?