Pacific Northwest Ballet will honor the work of the artist who choreographed everything from Fiddler on the Roof to West Side Story at the Jerome Robbins Festival this weekend. Angela Sterling
Our music critics have already chosen the 35 best music shows this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn to pick the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks for the best events in every genre—from the Local Sightings Film Festival to the Hugo House Grand Reopening Celebration, and from An Incredible Feast to Sheila Callaghan's play Everything You Touch. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

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Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Feast of St. Hildegard
Saint Hildegard of Bingen was many things: abbess, writer, composer, mystic, painter, herbalist, visionary, and polymath. (Recently, her extraordinary life provided fodder for author Nicola Griffith’s historical novel Hild.) Her writings also happen to contain the earliest known references to using hops in beer, which is reason enough for beer lovers to hoist a pint in her name. On her feast day (September 17), Ballard wood-fired pizzeria Delancey will host a sumptuous four-course supper in her honor, and Holy Mountain Brewing will supply the beer pairings—their mystical, esoteric ethos and hop-forward sensibility are just the right complement for a dinner in the spirit of Hildegard. JULIANNE BELL

Trove Noodle: Hawaiian Luau Pop-Up
There’s no comfort food quite like Hawaiian food. At this luau, Hawaiian-born sous chef Cecily Kimura of Joule—who was named one of Seattle Met’s next hot chefs for 2018 and who’s responsible for the restaurant’s rotating brunch buffet—will prepare a feast of local “kine grinds” (delicious eats). The menu includes Spam musubi, macaroni salad, lomi salmon (a fresh tomato and salmon salad), lau lau (pork wrapped with taro leaves), and tropical tipples, all with a touch of the signature flair Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi’s Relay Restaurant Group is known for. It all promises to be exceedingly ono (tasty). JULIANNE BELL

READINGS & TALKS

Esi Edugyan: Washington Black
An enslaved boy on a sugar plantation in Barbados becomes a personal servant to an English naturalist and abolitionist in this tale of freedom, danger, and invention. Canadian novelist Edugyan won the Giller Prize for Half-Blood Blues, which was also shortlisted for a ton of other awards, and Washington Black was longlisted for the 2018 Man Booker Prize.

John Kerry: Every Day Is Extra
Let’s be honest. Every day probably feels a little extra for John Kerry, who might qualify as the least "extra" man on the planet. When he ran for president in 2004, voters said they'd rather die from George W. Bush's warmongering than die from boredom under Kerry. They were dumb to think that way, but they weren't 100 percent wrong. In any event, the five-term senator from Massachusetts did turn out to be an incredibly effective secretary of state under President Barack Obama, and he had a front-row seat to some of the largest political and military disasters (and victories) in contemporary history. His memoir covers all of that, and, of course, serves as a "forceful testimony for the importance of diplomacy and American leadership," according to press materials. RICH SMITH

MONDAY-THURSDAY

FILM

70mm Film Festival
Put down your phone and surrender to the splendor of actually-epic-scale cinema in the cathedral that is the Cinerama. Not much unites the films in this 13-day festival other than a commitment to MAGNITUDE, but several are essential viewing. I know you’ve heard it before, but I’ll say it again: Seeing a film in a darkened theater with strangers is a secular sacrament. The fact that you can't pause, talk, text, or tweet until it's over is a feature. Please enjoy it while it's still available. SEAN NELSON
This week's films include: Tron, Back to the Future Part II (Mon), Top Gun, Ghostbusters (Tues), Vertigo, Phantom Thread (Wed), and 2001: A Space Odyssey (Thurs)

MONDAY-FRIDAY

FESTIVALS

Seattle Design Festival
Now in its eighth year, Design in Public's Seattle Design Festival explores how urbanism, architecture, and design can further justice, ecology, and community. 2018's theme, "Trust," will focus on bringing together diverse local communities with a lineup of arts events, panels, installations, discussions, and fun parties. For the final week, don't miss PARK(ing) Day, on which Seattleites will create pop-up parks and mini-playgrounds in parking spaces across town, with an awards ceremony wrap-up at the Center for Architecture and Design, as well as a design lecture with Bonnie Siegler.

MONDAY-SUNDAY ART

Bellwether Arts Week
As part of the SuttonBeresCuller-run arts festival Bellwether 2018, witness art events in Bellevue Downtown Park and Bellevue Arts Museum, including experimental painter Margie Livingston's 55 Laps canvas run, durational performance in A Great Unbridgeable Distance, Music and Performances in the Park, a reading with local poets, and more.

In Red Ink
“Imperialism leaves behind germs of rot which we must clinically detect and remove from our land and from our minds as well,” wrote West Indian anti-colonialist philosopher Frantz Fanon. By not privileging the imperial gaze, this group show of 20 Native American artists from around the country curated by RYAN! Feddersen (Okanogan/Arrow Lakes) with Chloe Dye Sherpe centers on the contemporary Native American perspective. Works include paintings on traditional Navajo rugs by John Feodorov (Diné), a fused glass installation of Native petroglyphs and modern symbols by Joe Feddersen (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation), and an Indigenous Futurist screen print, Anti-Retro, by Andrea Carlson (Ojibwe). KATIE KURTZ
Closing Sunday

TUESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Avennia Winemaker Dinner
Woodinville-based boutique winery Avennia will grace Renee Erickson's charming, bright eatery The Whale Wins for a casual evening of wine tasting paired with the restaurant's menu of wood-fired food.

READINGS & TALKS

Cristien Storm: Empowered Boundaries
The co-founder of Seattle's self-defense Home Alive organization will present her book Empowered Boundaries: Speaking Truth, Setting Boundaries, and Inspiring Social Change. Home Alive instructor and sexual health educator Becky Reitzes will join her.

Salon of Shame
Writing that makes you cringe ("middle school diaries, high school poetry, unsent letters") is read aloud with unapologetic hilarity at the Salon of Shame.

TUESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Janna Watson: Moody as Light
In the early 20th century, nonobjective painting was seen as something revolutionary. Today, it feels almost quaint and anachronistic, as though every painting for its own sake that the universe could possibly need has already been made. The large-scale mixed-media works of Toronto-based painter Janna Watson stand in defiance of this trend. Large brushstrokes and small bursts of color wiggle and dance on soft gradients like visual music. A recent article from Artsy named Watson's paintings among the most collectible offerings at Seattle Art Fair—but even if you're not in the market to buy art, these are very nice to look at. EMILY POTHAST
Closing Saturday

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Juventino Aranda: Pocket Full of Posies
As Kanye West demonstrated by tweeting a photo of himself wearing one, a red MAGA hat is no mere political artifact; it's a potently charged totem, both symptomatic and symbolic of America's deeply racist past and present. In a recent show at Greg Kucera Gallery, Juventino Aranda exhibited a painted cast bronze version of the MAGA hat with all the words removed except "GREAT," imbuing it with a tragicomic sense of resignation. The child of Mexican immigrants, Aranda marries the activist spirit of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta with a cool, conceptual post-minimalism to explore how ideology is communicated visually. Pocket Full of Posies is his first museum show. EMILY POTHAST
Closing Sunday

PERFORMANCE

Skylight
A young woman flees a long-term affair with a rich married restaurateur when his ailing wife finds them out. Having previously lived in splendid comfort virtually as a member of their happy extended family, she now lives in self-imposed exile, working with poor, violent kids who have even fewer resources than she does. Then late one night, her former lover’s son shows up to ask why she abandoned him. Shortly after he leaves, his father’s limo rolls up. David Hare’s drama, originally produced in 1995 and later revived in 2015 (with Bill Nighy and Carey Mulligan, just to give you a sense of the age disparity), is a strange combination of trenchant and way out of step with the psycho-social and psycho-sexual temperature of 2018. But, like most of his major works, it’s funny and involving, and it serves as a cracking showcase for two actors who know what they’re doing. SEAN NELSON

WEDNESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Autonomous Seattle: The Robot Car in the Emerald City
The autonomous vehicles (AVs) are coming (in about six or seven years), so what effect will these self-driving cars have on cities? The American Institute of Architects' Seattle Urban Design Forum says: "An AV is more accurately described as a 'disruptor' rather than a 'silver bullet,' potentially increasing both sprawl and traffic, and eviscerating mass transit use." Find out how we might organize our cities to reduce the sprawl that AVs could engender.

An Evening with Bill McKibben and Earthjustice
The campaign for Yes on I-1631 (the carbon fee initiative you will be voting on in November) will present a conversation with renowned environmentalist Bill McKibben and Earthjustice's Abigail Dillen. Bad Saint will supply the musical entertainment. Co-hosted by 350 Seattle and the Nature Conservancy Seattle.

Sharon H. Chang and Friends: Hapa Tales and Other Lies
Hapa Tales and Other Lies is a meditation on colonization, Native sovereignty, stereotypes of Hawaii and Hawaiians, Asian American and mixed race identity, and activism. In addition to the reading, there will be performances by Marian Macapinlac, Selena Velasco, Angel Alviar-Langeley (aka Moonyeka), and Rayann Kalei'okalani Harumi Onzuka (Kalei).

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

A Small History of Amal, Age 7
In A Small History of Amal, Age 7, a little Indian boy fights the god of death shortly after the Mumbai train bombings in 2006. Nabilah S. Ahmed plays the title role in this one, and she’s delivered standout performances in everything I’ve ever seen her in. RICH SMITH

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

ROAR: Your Voice. Your Story. Our Truth.
Dwana Holloway of studio e, photographer Naomi Ishisaka, and Elisheba Johnson of the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture's Public Art Project have juried this open-call art exhibition.
Closing Sunday

PERFORMANCE

Femme Fatale
A Prom Queen and Can Can collab!? Yes, please! The Can Can culinary cabaret, which serves up some of the best butts and beignets in town, is partnering with rising music star Prom Queen for their summer show, and it's a safe bet that it will be a hit. That said, the team could have chosen a better subject than Mata Hari, who catapulted to fame using an outsider's vision of Indonesia. Hopefully their adaptation will avoid Hari's pitfalls by doing more than just simply reproducing the Dutch dancer's problematic early-20th-century Orientalist style. Otherwise, this will be a spectacular shitshow. CHASE BURNS

Native Gardens
Though Latina playwright Karen Zacarías hails from Washington, DC, her well-received comedy Native Gardens sounds like the most Seattle shit ever. An impending barbecue party ignites a property-line dispute between two neighbors. One couple—a Chilean lawyer named Pablo and his Ph.D.-candidate wife Tania—likes their garden overgrown with native plants. The other couple—Republicans Frank and Virginia Butley—keeps a prim English garden. As the two couples battle over how their gardens grow, a bunch of economic and racial tensions rise to the surface and boil over. Arlene Martínez-Vázquez directs. RICH SMITH

Richard III
Last year, the crew of upstart crow collective produced an all-female adaptation of Shakespeare's Henry VI that was so good, it actually made people want to see a production of Henry VI. I reckon they'll have the same luck with this classic tale of throne-hungry villainy. Top-notch veteran actor Sarah Hartlett will take on the title role. RICH SMITH

THURSDAY

PERFORMANCE

MarchFourth, Buzz Brump
The vivacious, extravagantly bizarre MarchFourth is a performance troupe that hails from Portland and features 15 or so members that encompass a full band (bassist, guitarist, percussion corps, brass section) along with fire-eaters, stilt walkers, burlesque dancers, and acrobats. Clad in bedazzled, repurposed marching-band-themed costumes given a burlesque-meets-vaudeville-meets-circus-tent twist (think lots of black-and-white stripes, gold buttons and sequins, feathers, and flamboyant head pieces), MarchFourth delivers a high-spirited, intoxicating mix of indulgent theatrics and musical mastery, their sound dousing New Orleans–style marching band brass with elements of hard rock, funk, gypsy jazz, Afrobeat, and even some Latin music. All together, it makes for one wildly eclectic stage show that is far from novelty and definitely worth checking out. LEILANI POLK

Miss Coco Peru in 'The Taming of the Tension'
There's a lot of drag to see this fall, but you’d be remiss if you missed Miss Coco Peru’s visit to Seattle. Peru, the drag persona of Clinton Leupp, is an icon of contemporary American drag—up there with RuPaul and Lady Bunny and Magnolia Crawford. She reminds audiences that drag doesn’t need death drops and high kicks and billions of sequins to be entertaining. Good drag can be a solid joke and a funny face, and Miss Coco Peru has got at least one of each. CHASE BURNS

Performance Lab: In the Round
On the Boards will perpetuate its long tradition of gathering emerging and seasoned artists for an evening R&D cabaret of dance, theater, and music, and other experimentation and audience feedback.

READINGS & TALKS

Anand Giridharadas: The Self-Interested Altruism of Today’s Elite
Want some good arguments to lob at our Jeff Bezos–worshiping, techno-libertarian overlords who think Amazon's "Community Banana Stand" serves as a sterling example of corporate magnanimity? Then pick up a copy of former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas's new book, Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World, and buy yourself a ticket to his Town Hall lecture. In the meantime, if you see Bezos gliding around town on a Solowheel, tell him to pay his fucking taxes. RICH SMITH

Jim Williams: Path of the Puma
In Path of the Puma: The Remarkable Resilience of the Mountain Lion, wildlife biologist Jim Williams dives into the wildlife research of "ghost cats" from Canada’s southern Yukon Territory to Argentina and Chile's Tierra del Fuego. Hear him talk about what makes the fourth carnivore in the food chain so resilient and resourceful, and what conservationists are doing to protect the species.

Makers of the Now: Contemporary Native American and First Nations Artists Lecture Series
Five Native American and First Nations artists from the Pacific Northwest and Alaska will discuss how they explore indigenous culture of the past and present in their work. Tonight, hear from lauded Northwest glass artist Preston Singletary.

THURSDAY-FRIDAY

COMEDY

Indie Month
I started taking improv classes at Jet City in January and in that time I’ve learned two things: 1) How to “Yes, And” and 2) Nobody has a neutral opinion about improv. So! This month is either absolutely for you or absolutely not. Either way, studies prove laughing with a bunch of other people IRL is good for you and this could be one remedy for when the SAD sets in. Featuring over 35 groups and 100 performers with four teams performing a night, the festival features everything from Yeah Okay (an amazingly quick-witted ensemble) to Thunder Gap (a six-member team of experienced and multi-talented improvisers tackling long-form improv with grit, goofiness, and groundedness). KATIE KURTZ
This week's events include: The World’s Worst Movie Podcast Ever, Fat Cats, Bingo & G, Mr. Snake (Thurs) and Bad Therapy, The Next Generation Gap, One-Handed Clap, Captain (Fri)

THURSDAY & SATURDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Deb Caletti: A Heart in a Body in the World
National Book Award finalist Deb Caletti's new novel is about a woman who runs cross-country from Seattle to D.C. in an attempt to outpace a tragedy haunting her.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

COMEDY

Damon Wayans Jr.
Being the son of Damon Wayans and nephew to three uncles and an aunt who entertain folks for a living, Damon Wayans Jr. really can’t betray his DNA and familial pressure—or there would be merciless, hilarious ribbing to endure. Thankfully, the 35-year-old Wayans has succeeded as a TV and film actor, writer, and stand-up comedian. He admits that his humor is more obscure than his father’s and less enamored of discussing current events. Those into raunchy routines, though, will eat up Junior’s act. He does a bit about a pigeon and its bobbing head that will stay with you for a long time. DAVE SEGAL

PERFORMANCE

Prelude to a Kiss
Strawberry Theatre Workshop last-minute swapped out Reckless for this play by Craig Lucas, about a woman who may or may not have switched bodies with a sick octogenarian during her honeymoon, and her husband who gradually comes to realize that his beautiful young wife is harboring the soul of an old man. Lucas's work has been seen as an allegory for AIDS; it was nominated for the 1990 Tony Award and the Pulitzer Prize. The cast of Reckless—including MJ Sieber, Anastasia Higham, and Galen Joseph Osier—will appear in this play instead.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Nightmare of Ages
The young, self-taught Canadian illustrator and comics artist Dewey Guyen is a perfect guest for the eccentric art collective Push/Pull, given his penchant for the satanic, monstrous, and punk themes often mined by Push/Pull's members. He harks back to album covers, Francisco Goya's fearsome brutes, cartoons, and psychedelia. Guyen and friends will be releasing a book featuring images by other artists, including Farel Dalrymple, Seth Goodkind, Angelita Martinez, Heidi Estey, and other wonderful weirdos, with Guyen’s drawings in vellum overlaying their designs. JOULE ZELMAN
Opening Thursday

FRIDAY

COMEDY

Miscast
Funny and spontaneous performers, led by John Carroll, act out a real movie that none of them are familiar with. September's performance is "Classic Movie Night" and the cast includes Mykaela Hopps, Elena Martinez, Kevin McVey, Jekeva Phillips, Ethan Smith, and other great improvisers.

The Nasty Body
Comic hottie Claire Webber has not yet provided much detail on this event other than that it's "comedy and burlesque about life after eliminating your large intestine." But that already sounds good, and Claire Webber is gold.

FOOD & DRINK

Grilled Things and Chicken Wings Tour
At this neighborhood food tour, load up on a sundry of meats, from grilled to skewered to deep-fried, along with some refreshing dessert drinks, and discover "great additions of Asian Pacific flavors to put under the tradition of summer barbecue tastes."

Rosé on the Patio
Celebrate the end of summer by lounging on the patio, sipping a selection of Italian rosé, and nibbling on picnic snacks while a DJ provides background music.

READINGS & TALKS

DeRay Mckesson: On the Other Side of Freedom
Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson wears a blue vest, maintains an impeccably trimmed goatee, hosts Pod Save the People, and spearheads Campaign Zero, an organization devoted to ending police brutality through legislative means. He's touring the country with a new book about his experiences "at the front lines" of the BLM movement. RICH SMITH

Grady Hendrix: We Sold Our Souls
Witty and sick novelist/short story writer Hendrix (he wrote the scary faux-IKEA catalog novel Horrorstor) will read from We Sold Our Souls, a transposition of "the timeless myth of the Faustian bargain" to the heavy metal scene.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Kate Neckel: Stories
Let your eye rove over the energetic abstraction of Kate Neckel, a longtime resident of New York who's recently relocated to Seattle.
Opening Friday

SexualiTease: A Planned Parenthood Burlesque
Help these sexy folks, including the Luminous Pariah, the Shanghai Pearl, and host Sailor St. Claire, raise money for the sexual health organization with slinky burlesque acts.

Showing Out: Contemporary Dance Choreographers
Queer dance artist Dani Tirrell has curated this showcase of contemporary black choreographers and dancers, highlighting themes of black and queer experience. Locals Randy Ford and Taqueet$ are just two of the intriguing artists on the roster. Each performance has a different lineup.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel
This traveling exhibition is a full-scale reproduction of one of the most monumental artistic achievements of the Western world. Unlike the original, this one's available to see up-close.
Opening Friday

FILM

Local Sightings Film Festival
What is this city becoming? What have we lost in the rush and thrust of all these new developments? To whom does this growing city belong? The brilliant Local Sightings film festival will show films that reveal the answers to these questions, through features, shorts, and animation that are born here or hereabouts. There's much to see and much to talk about. CHARLES MUDEDE

Port Townsend Film Festival
Veteran actor Danny Glover and world-class filmmakers Charles Burnett and Jane Campion will be the special guests at this festival in this scenic Peninsula town. Highlights include the restoration of a 1927 film from Tacoma's Weaver Studios, W.C. Fields's Eyes of the Totem; the documentary Afghan Cycles, about the brave women daring to ride bicycles in Kabul; La Soledad, in which a father tries to save his family by searching for a treasure in a moldering Venezuelan mansion; Megan Griffiths's Sadie, and other indie, international, and esoteric wonders. There's also an outdoor film program including The Lion King, The Princess Bride, and A Hard Day's Night.

FOOD & DRINK

Fremont Oktoberfest
Raise a (gigantic, oversized) stein to Seattle's biggest fall beer festival, which has been running for 21 years and features over 80 craft beers.

PERFORMANCE

Everything You Touch
The New York Times calls Sheila Callaghan's play Everything You Touch "volatile," "histrionic," "florid and highly flammable." In other words, it's perfect theatrical fodder for Washington Ensemble Theatre. The story, to the extent that there is a story, involves a depressed young woman named Jess and her possibly imaginary friend/lover/father/fashion-designer, Victor. Themes of body-image issues and alienation bind the whole thing together. You're going because Kiki Abba is one of the best comedic actors in town, and she's playing the lead role. Maggie Rogers directs. RICH SMITH

The Good Woman of Setzuan
Bertolt Brecht’s morality play about morality interrogates the paradox articulated most memorably in a 1979 smash hit by Nick Lowe: Do you really gotta be cruel to be kind? Brecht rolls the question up in the story of a sex worker named Shen Teh, who buys a tobacco shop with money sent from the gods as a gift for her generosity. When shit goes south, she disguises herself as a man in order to save her shop. The gambit works for a time—but at what cost? You’ll likely leave this twisted parable cursing the interlocking problems of capitalism and the patriarchy. RICH SMITH

Jerome Robbins Festival
If you've ever lunged around your living room snapping your fingers like a Shark or a Jet, or if you've ever shimmied around like a rich man (ya ba dibba dibba dibba dibba dibba dibba dum), then you've danced Jerome Robbins's choreography. This extra special festival celebrates his cinematic work as well as his lesser known stuff, including Circus Polka, with music by Igor Stravinsky; In the Night, with a Chopin score; Afternoon of a Faun, to Debussy's classic; and three other dances. Robbins coached PNB artistic director Peter Boal for years. It'll be exciting to see how the student interprets the work of the master. RICH SMITH

SATURDAY

ART

CoCA Sanctuary Auction
See participants raise money for contemporary art at this marathon of art-making (you can catch up with them in the evening at the party).

Museum Day
Get cultured for free at one of the museums participating in Smithsonian's Museum Day. All you need to do is download the ticket from the Smithsonian's website, grab a companion, and show your pass at the Seattle Art Museum, the MOHAI, the Wing Luke, the Henry, the Burke, Bellevue Arts Museum, or other institutions out of town. Choose carefully, though, because you only get one.

COMEDY

Gabriel "Fluffy" Iglesias
Mega-successful stand-up comedian, actor, and Volkswagen minibus collector Iglesias will deliver some family-friendly laughs.

The Nightmare Society
The Nightmare Society tells the story of a commune of artists who act out your nightmares at the sound of a grandfather clock. Explore your deepest fears while intermittently giggling at the revival of this hit improvised horror show, which always comes up with bizarre and compelling imagery.

FESTIVALS

Seattle Children's Festival
I want to go somewhere where, instead of getting head-turns and raised eyebrows, no one even blinks when my daughter issues her piercing pterodactyl shriek—where it simply blends into the background of thousands of other tiny voices all raised to the sky in a chorus of noise. Seattle Children’s Fest seems like the place. Plus, there’s plenty to keep her entertained, including five stages worth of performances (dance from around the world included), interactive music-driven workshops, arts and crafts, and “tactile learning activities.” I’m sold. LEILANI POLK

FOOD & DRINK

Fall Ice Cream Flavor Tasting
Be the first to sample a dozen upcoming seasonal Molly Moon's flavors, including sweet honey corn cake, bourbon pepita brittle, blackberry creme fraiche, cabin cocoa and vegan chocolate donut, and sip an autumnal cocktail while mingling with the Molly Moon's team, chefs, and farm partners.

PERFORMANCE

Church of the Auntie Christ
Local drag weirdo Miss Texas 1988 stars as a confused Christian woman accompanied by two raunchy choir boys (and other special guests). Opt for the late show if you're looking for maximum amounts of booze and profanity.

READINGS & TALKS

Contrast Collective
This Vancouver, B.C., nonprofit has launched a print magazine dedicated to artists of color. They'll be presenting their inaugural publication, The Identity Issue, featuring work by women and non-binary people, as well as their follow-up, Histories, with contributions from all genders. See Domunique Booker, Krystal Paraboo, and Contrast Collective founder Molly Randhawa on this night.

Deb Caletti: A Heart in a Body in the World
National Book Award finalist Deb Caletti's new novel is about a woman who runs cross-country from Seattle to D.C. in an attempt to outpace a tragedy haunting her.

Frank Abe, Shawn Wong, Stephen Sumida, and Tom Ikeda
Asian American intellectuals, including biographer Frank Abe, will gather to commemorate John Okada, the author of the classic No-No Boy. This was Okada's only novel; it was spurned upon publication in 1957 for its anti-war message and treatment of Japanese internment in the 1940s. Editor Abe and contributors Shawn Wong and Stephen Sumida will be joined by moderator Tom Ikeda of Densho at the launch of John Okada: The Life & Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy.

Hugo House Grand Reopening Celebration
Rejoice! Hugo House will at last unveil its new home, much more spacious and cranny-filled than the former monastery where it's been hunkered for the past few years. Eminent (but friendly!) locals like Anastacia-Renee, Quenton Baker, and Nicole Hardy along with Hugo House writers-in-residence Kristen Millares Young and Amber Flame will read aloud, and the Bushwick Book Club will perform book-inspired music. Stay on for a party with KEXP's DJ Gabriel Teodros.

SUNDAY

ART

Alloy & Pffft: Sara Osebold and Ellen Ziegler
Virtually every visual artist is a scavenger of some form or another, hoarding scrap materials and other objects that ordinary people see as garbage. Through the alchemical transformation of art making, these materials can take on new life. The nature of this new life is examined in Alloy & Pffft, a two-person show from multimedia artist and longtime SOIL member Ellen Ziegler and printmaker/sculptor Sara Osebold. As the name suggests, Robertson Garage is a pop-up venue located in the garage of artist Barbara Robertson. On Sunday, September 23, from 2 to 5 p.m., both artists will be on site for an open studio to discuss art and friendship. EMILY POTHAST
Opening Sunday

Fall for Zines!
The ever-ambitious Kate Berwanger (who runs Swerve Zine Library and Assembly Literary Open Mic) will host this festival of comics and zines, complete with vendors, a DJ, a raffle, and more. Go if you love indie illustration and creation.

COMEDY

Minority Retort with Neel Nanda
In an interview I conducted with Central Comedy Show co-host Isaac Novak, he observed that most comedy bills in Seattle still consist of about 80-percent white males. One imagines that is also the case in Portland—or perhaps it’s even greater, seeing as the Rose City’s population has a higher Caucasian percentage than the Emerald City’s. With this statistic in mind, Portland-based stand-up comedy event Minority Retort offers a platform to redress this imbalance by championing comics of color. DAVE SEGAL

FOOD & DRINK

An Incredible Feast
At this fundraiser feast, “where the farmers are the stars,” more than 15 acclaimed Seattle chefs will be matched up with local farms to create a locally sourced spread. This year’s batch of culinary luminaries includes Autumn Martin of Hot Cakes, Cam Hanin of Ma’ono, Matthew Lewis of Where Ya at Matt, Michael Whisenhunt of Central Smoke, Tamara Murphy of Terra Plata, and more, and they’ll be whipping up dishes using fresh ingredients from Alvarez Organic Farm and Nash’s Organic Produce, among others. Plus, there’s local beer and wine, live music, carnival games, and a silent auction. Proceeds benefit the Center for Urban Horticulture. JULIANNE BELL

Mkt. Anniversary Dinner
To celebrate five years of business, the Italian-inspired Tangletown eatery will offer a three-course prix fixe menu and wine pairing. Feast on polenta fritters, green beans, and baby lettuce salad for the table before digging into some Bucatini Cacio e Pepe or Strozzapreti beef ragu. They'll have birthday cake for dessert.

Sweet Tooth Pop-Up
Sate your bottomless need for sweets at this South Lake Union pop-up, which will showcase cookies, ice cream, macarons, doughnuts, pastries, and other sucrose-laden treats from a variety of artisan vendors. The confection selection will include the pastel-hued meringue creations of Alexandra’s Macarons, artisan fizzy drinks in flavors like strawberry rhubarb and Concord grape from Soda Jerk Soda, and mesmerizing made-to-order Thai-style fried ice cream from SÜSU Rolled Ice Cream, just to name a few. JULIANNE BELL

PERFORMANCE

Kitchen Sink: A Divine Variety Show
Mercury Divine hosts a variety show at Kremwerk known as Kitchen Sink, a chance to witness drag, comedy, music, circus, and dance all in one place.

RuPaul's Drag Race: Werq The World
Did someone say Shangela is coming to town? Shangela is coming to town!! The queen who was robbed—robbed!—on season three of All Stars brings her amazing talent to Seattle, along with some other hags named Violet Chachki, Valentina, and Kim Chi. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

READINGS & TALKS

Liebowitz Moschovakis Galvin Rotholtz Smith: A Reading
Excellent local poets will read: Emily Liebowitz and Sarah Galvin from Mount Analogue, The Stranger's Rich Smith, Montreux Rotholtz, and Anna Moschovakis. Collectively, they've been published in the Guardian, io, New Ohio Review, Vice Magazine, Ugly Duckling Presse, Black Warrior Review, jubilat, and, of course, The Stranger.

Norman Fischer, Catherine Bresner, Joshua Edwards
Hear poetry from Zen Buddhist priest Norman Fischer (Untitled Series: Life As It Is), Catherine Bresner (whose The Merriam Webster Series and Everyday Eros chapbooks were published by Mount Analogue), and Joshua Edwards (Imperial Nostalgias and Photographs Taken at One-Hour Intervals During a Walk from Galveston Island to the West Texas Town of Marfa).