Daybreak Star Center's 5th Annual Indigenous Peoples' Day Celebration features a dinner and dance performances. Jonathan H Lee
In place of Columbus Day, Seattle City Council rightly recognizes the first Monday in October (October 8, this year) as Indigenous Peoples' Day, which honors Native cultures and communities in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. From special events to continuing exhibitions, there are many ways to discover local tribal traditions, see Native artwork and performances, and learn about current issues faced by Native communities during the week of October 8 and in the preceding days. See them all below, and find even more events on our community calendar.

OCTOBER 4

COMMUNITY

La Charla de la Gente: Ayer
This series of panels presented by Northwest Folklife will examine Mexican American, Chicanx, Latinx, and Indigenous identities.
Chinatown-International District

OCTOBER 4-28

ART

Preston Singletary: Raven's Treasures
Over the course of a career spanning more than 40 years, contemporary Tlingit artist Preston Singletary has become one of the biggest names in the Northwest's thriving, collaborative glass-art community. Challenging the notion that indigenous art must be defined by a relationship to traditional materials, Singletary's work has expanded the notion of what constitutes a "traditional material," creating objects rooted in both history and innovation. Singletary's work is in the collections of many museums around the world, including the Museum of Glass. EMILY POTHAST
Pioneer Square

OCTOBER 5

FILM

The Resistance Saga
See a free screening of the film 500 Years: Life in Resistance, the latest in a trilogy about indigenous people in Guatemala, followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers. The organizers write that the film is about "the epic story that led Guatemala to a tipping point in their history, from the genocide trial of General Ríos Montt to the citizen uprising that toppled President Otto Perez Molina."
Beacon Hill

OCTOBER 6

FILM

The Resistance Saga Workshop
Human rights leader and journalist Dr. Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj will lead a workshop featuring a screening of When the Mountains Tremble (the first movie in the Resistance Saga trilogy about indigenous people in Guatemala) and a talk about "the groundbreaking movement to honor the dignity of Guatemala’s Indigenous communities." The workshop will wrap up with a presentation from Paco de Onís and Pamela Yates of the human rights media organization Skylight about the making of the trilogy.
Downtown

READINGS & TALKS

Natalie Diaz: Self-Portraits
Most people know Natalie Diaz for the hilarious and poignant poetry found in her first collection, When My Brother Was an Aztec (Copper Canyon Press). But at Hugo House, she'll reveal a series of self-portraits paired with new poems as part of a discussion about contemporary Native identity. Her presentation falls on the 150th anniversary of the birth of Edward S. Curtis, the Seattle-based photographer credited with creating the images white America associates with Native Americans, which makes this whole thing hum with historical significance. RICH SMITH
Capitol Hill

SPORTS & RECREATION

SpiritWalk - Walk for Native Health
Celebrate Native cultures and help expand healthcare resources for local Native communities at this 5K walk/run. A picnic with live entertainment and raffles will follow.
Magnolia

OCTOBER 8

COMMUNITY

Seattle’s Indigenous Peoples’ Day 2018: March and City Celebration
Gather for a blessing and rally in Westlake Park and march to City Hall for a program of Native music and performances before the 5th Annual Indigenous People's Day Celebration at the Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center.
Downtown

5th Annual Indigenous People's Day Celebration
After the Indigenous Peoples’ Day March and City Celebration downtown, gather at the Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center to celebrate Native cultures in the Puget Sound—particularly Native womxn—at this fifth annual celebration. After a dinner, activists Luana Ross and Jeri Moomaw will give presentations and indigenous dancers from around the country will perform.
Magnolia

Highline Indigenous People's Day
At this third annual celebration, Denise Bill will share traditions of the Muckleshoot Tribe and Hiram Calf Looking (of the NW Two Spirit Society) will talk about healing and advocacy.
Des Moines

Cupcake Royale will also be donating 10% of their sales on October 8 to the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation.

OCTOBER 9

ART

Yəhaw̓ Artist Residency - Native Kut
Artists-in-residence Pah-tu Pitt and Sean Gallagher will carve and print in the library, creating work around the theme of water rights.
Downtown

OCTOBER 13

FILM

Indigenous Futures: Native Voices in Filmmaking
See four films that showcase Native voices and stories, meet Northwest tribal leaders, and learn about organizations—like Real Rent—that are working to represent local indigenous peoples.
West Seattle

THROUGH OCTOBER 23

ART

Marie Watt: Companion Species
Watt experiments in many forms—monumental sculpture, tapestry, print, etching—but returns frequently to animal forms, indigenous knowledge, and powerful words.
Pioneer Square
Opening reception Oct 4

THROUGH DECEMBER 1

ART

This Is Our Home, Where We Belong
Diné/Twana curator and contributor Denise Emerson has chosen four fellow Coast Salish women artists to elaborate expressions of "environmental justice, identity, and place": Caroline Edwards (Swinomish), Karen Engel (Shoalwater Bay), Kimberly Miller (Skokomish), and Abbey Pierson (Cowlitz). It's a great opportunity to remind yourself of indigenous peoples' connection to their homeland and resistance to ethnic cleansing. This is part of the yəhaw̓ art project partnership with the Seattle Public Library.
Downtown
Opening reception Oct 6

THROUGH DECEMBER 16

ART

Sasquatch: Ancient Native Perspectives on the Mysterious Beings of the Woods
Discover Native American mythical traditions and lore that may have spurred cryptozoological legends: the giantess Dzoonokwa or Slapu, Sasquatch, and other humanoids.
Aurburn

THROUGH FEBRUARY 10

ART

Native Portraiture: Power and Perception
This exhibit invites you to contemplate structural oppression and appropriation of Native subjects in portraits by non-Native people, as well as Native artists' reflections and reworking of this stereotypical iconography.
Tacoma