One of Seattle's biggest music festivals, Capitol Hill Block Party (headlined by Lizzo, Mitski, the Black Tones, and more), is just around the corner. Joshua Lewis

Whether July makes you think of hot dogs and fireworks, air-conditioned movie theaters, outdoor concerts and performances, or ice-cold beers, you'll find tons of things to do this month that will allow you to soak up that coveted Seattle sunshine (or stay cool) now that summer is in full effect. As we do every month, we've compiled the biggest events you need to know about in every genre, from the Ballard SeafoodFest to the Seattle Outdoor Theater Festival, from Ali Wong to Beck with Cage the Elephant, from Seafair festivals to moon landing anniversary events, and from Fourth of July events to Bastille Day parties. If all of that isn't enough, you can also look ahead to the rest of this year's big events, see our list of cheap & easy year-round events, visit our outside calendar, or check out our complete Things To Do calendar.

Found something you like and don't want to forget about it later? Click "Save Event" on any of the linked events below to add it to your own private list.

    JULY 1-27

    MUSIC

  1. 2019 Seattle Chamber Music Society Summer Festival
    The Seattle Chamber Music Society is, once again, throwing its Summer Festival, with free informal recitals and full orchestral performances for all ages throughout the month of July. The cabal of esteemed artists involved this year will include Andrew Wan, Jonathan Vinocour, Jeewon Park, Tessa Lark, Yura Lee, and many more. Plus, don't miss the Music Under the Stars series, during which a student ensemble sets up in a park and plays to whoever shows up, often folks with picnic blankets in tow and maybe a surreptitious bottle of wine, after which Benaroya Hall pipes in whatever festival performance is happening that night.

    JULY 2

    FILM

  2. 'Midsommar' Opening
    If you share the widespread opinion that Ari Aster's debut feature, Hereditary, is one of the most stressful, beautiful, cathartic horror movies ever made, then you’ve been waiting with bated breath for his follow-up. Midsommar is a brightly lit, flowery folk nightmare about a troubled American couple (Florence Pugh and Jack Reynor) traveling to rural Sweden to take part in some sort of charming outdoor festival. The trailer makes it look like 1973's Wicker Man with a dash of sexual jealousy and a gallon of hallucinatory terror. Please peer up from your slimy burrows, O gods of fright-night entertainment, and let Midsommar be as great as it looks. JOULE ZELMAN

  3. 'Spider-Man: Far from Home' Opening
    This live-action Spider-Man movie takes place after the events of Avengers: Endgame and has Peter Parker (Tom Holland) just trying to enjoy a damn vacation. Things don't turn out as planned.

    JULY 2-28

    SPORTS & RECREATION

  4. Seattle Mariners 2019 Home Games
    Seattle's MLB team's 2019 home season includes July games against the St. Louis Cardinals (July 2-4), the Los Angeles Angels (July 21), the Texas Rangers (July 22-24), and the Detroit Tigers (July 22-28).

    JULY 3

    MUSIC

  5. Chase Atlantic, Lauren Sanderson
    Australian alt-pop trio Chase Atlantic will continue their North American summer tour right into Seattle with a featured opening set by hip-pop artist Lauren Sanderson.

  6. Feed Me Presents the High Street Creeps Tour
    British DJ and producer Jon Gooch has made music through several genres as Feed Me, Spor, and Seventh Stitch, but will return as Feed Me on his High Street Creeps Tour with new electronica to share with Seattle.

  7. Pentatonix, Rachel Platten
    Texas-based a cappella pop group Pentatonix are best known for their covers of popular hits—particularly Christmas songs—in their own harmony-laden style. On their summer world tour, they'll be joined by singer-songwriter and pop artist Rachel Platten.

    JULY 3-21

    SPORTS & RECREATION

  8. Seattle Storm Home Games
    In July, Seattle's only professional basketball team, the Seattle Storm, will take other WNBA teams from around the country, including New York Liberty (July 3 & 14), Atlanta Dream (July 5), Dallas Wings (July 12), and Las Vegas Aces (July 19).

    JULY 4

    HOLIDAYS

  9. Fourth of July
    Celebrate life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness on Independence Day while eating a hot dog (if you like hot dogs). Find a full list of things to do on our complete Fourth of July calendar, like Seafair Summer Fourth and Plum's Summer of Love 4th of July Vegan BBQ.

    JULY 5

    FILM

  10. 'Meeting Gorbachev' Opening
    "Mikhail Sergeyevich, please allow me to explain myself," says Werner Herzog. "I am a German, and the first German that you probably met wanted to kill you." So begins Herzog's affecting documentary about Mikhail Gorbachev, built chiefly around three conversations with the former leader of the Soviet Union—a once-titanic figure who, at age 88, Herzog now describes as "a deeply lonesome man." Particularly given America's current relations with Russia, Meeting Gorbachev feels disarmingly affectionate—"Everything about Gorbachev was genuine," Herzog reflects—but the director never loses his usual clear-eyed gaze. Meeting Gorbachev also offers plenty of historical context, examining events that shaped not only the Soviet Union, but the world: Chernobyl, nuclear disarmament, perestroika and glasnost, an attempted coup, the dissolution of the USSR. (Since this is a Herzog film, there's also a sequence in which the director tells viewers how to kill garden slugs with open jars of beer.) ERIK HENRIKSEN

    MUSIC

  11. Jonny Lang, Robert Cray Band
    Few contemporary axmen can match Jonny Lang's skill at crafting sizzling solos, and even fewer share his penchant for blue-eyed soul bellows. But no one in any genre can top Lang's ability to make guitar-playing look like the most vile of tortures. During each concert, Lang musters an expression that screams, "Bloody hell, I just lost my hand to the hedge clippers," even as his digits nimbly operate the strings. It's hard to discern the source of Lang's ostentatious angst, as he's been a successful musician since age 16. Fortunately, he doesn't resort to a far-fetched lyrical backstory, as dramatized in Ghost World when an all-white group moaned about "picking cotton all day." But Lang's recent leanings toward polished boogie rock have alienated longtime followers. If he unveils too many tunes from 2003's Long Time Coming at this show, fans might even outscowl their wayward hero. ANDREW MILLER

  12. Rick Springfield and Eddie Money
    Eighties pop-rock icon Rick Springfield will come to town with his irreverent showmanship and lifelong soap opera star mystique on his Best in Show tour with Eddie Money.

  13. Sir Mix-a-Lot, G.A.S.
    You know, there's something special about a man who really loves ass. I think it reveals a lot about his character—moral rectitude, family values, unshakable faith. And that's why I'm so thankful that Seattle's patron saint of hip-hop and King of Ass, Sir Mix-A-Lot, is working a bit of his magic on Capitol Hill. Roll through to pay tribute to our own titan of PNW rap. JASMYNE KEIMIG

    JULY 5-7

    FILM

  14. Czech That Film
    This mini-fest will bring award-winning and popular Czech films to Seattle for one weekend. Try Jan Hřebejk’s romantic comedies Deserter and Suitor, the historical drama Jan Palach (about the young man who famously martyred himself in protest of Soviet aggression), and the coming-of-age tale Winter Flies.

    JULY 6

    FESTIVALS

  15. The Vera Project Presents Search Party
    Show your support for excellent all-ages music and art venue Vera Project by dancing to live sets from local and touring rockers the Darkness, Murder City Devils, Black Pistol Fire, and Pink Parts (as well as KEXP DJs) while eating treats from a variety of PNW food trucks and drinking over 40 different Elysian brews. All proceeds go to the Vera Project, so make sure to bring a friend and drink up.

    MUSIC

  16. Electric Six, Kyle Shutt
    Maybe you haven’t listened to Electric Six in a while. I kind of understand. Their brand of disco-meets-trash-meets-pop-meets-snide-cultural-commentary is, for me, firmly planted in the early 2000s zeitgeist of music videos that played on VH1 before school. “Danger! High Voltage” was stuck in my head for maybe years. But they remain a great listen with their propensity toward cheekiness (led fearlessly by lead singer Dick Valentine) and extremely danceable beats. JASMYNE KEIMIG

  17. Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Son Little
    I’ve seen Trombone Shorty perform on his home turf—at New Orleans Jazz Fest—and I’ve seen him on stages outside of the Crescent City, and all of those shows had unbridled showmanship and enthusiasm in common. The musician otherwise known as Troy Andrews can get a crowd on their feet and cutting a rug in no time flat. I once witnessed him take a crowd of end-of-weekend fest-goers, all tired, grumpy, and sunburned, and lift them up to reinvigorated heights with his high-octane fusion of NOLA-spiced jazz, blues, funk, and hip-hop grooves. Trombone Shorty’s lively personality serves his well-honed talents on trombone and trumpet well; there’s some traditional blowing and tooting, sure, but there’s also machine-gun bursts and blasts, velvety-voiced singing and crowd-amping in between, and a tight backing band chugging along with him, fleshing it all out and adding the oomph. His set lists include original material and covers songs by artists ranging from the Meters to Nirvana. LEILANI POLK

    JULY 6-7

    FOOD & DRINK

  18. Seattle Street Food Festival 2019
    The ever-popular curbside festival from Mobile Food Rodeo spreads over five city blocks and will gather more than 75 food trucks, restaurants, and pop-ups on the streets of South Lake Union for a night of large-scale gluttony. This year sees the addition of a stage for live music and upwards of 30 vendors hawking craft beer, cider, seltzers, cocktails, and more. JULIANNE BELL

    THROUGH JULY 7

    PERFORMANCE

  19. Wicked
    Now is your chance to see the musical that, 16 years ago, made everyone remember musicals existed. You’ve heard the spiel—it’s the Wizard of Oz, except not boring, and sympathetic to the antagonist (the Wicked Witch of the West). Wicked is spectacular, especially if the cast you see has a Galinda (originally played by Kristin Chenoweth) with a lot of spunk. But, unfortunately for all of us, all of Wicked can’t be the bombastic, show-stopping “Defying Gravity.” And once “Defying Gravity” plays out and you’re absolutely sated, there’s a whole other act to sit through. Wicked is still good, and at some moments great. Especially if, unlike me, you haven’t seen it four times—or played a medley of the music in your middle-school wind ensemble. NATHALIE GRAHAM

    JULY 7

    MUSIC

  20. Khalid, Clairo
    God, it really seems like Khalid is everywhere recently—I get the appeal. A young, Gen Z quasi-R&B pop singer who laments about “not being able to really connect” and just wanting to “talk.” One gets the sense that the 21-year-old singer might slide into your DMs to confess his messy feelings, only to ghost you at the most convenient opportunity. But enough projection. “Location” was a legitimate bop, especially once UK rapping sensation Little Simz hopped on the remix. “Saved” got me through many a walk home. “Talk” is annoying, but fine. If you don’t mind the cheese, by all means, Khalid is your man. He’ll be joined by fresh-faced and equally viral lo-fi pop sensation Clairo. JASMYNE KEIMIG

    JULY 8

    READINGS & TALKS

  21. Darcey Steinke: Flash Count Diary
    In her new book Flash Count Diary, Darcy Steinke draws interesting parallels to illuminate the experience of menopause. For example, apparently the only other animal that undergoes menopause besides the human uterus-haver is the female orca! Other topics she covers in the book include witchcraft accusations, avant-garde 20th-century art, and mortality. No doubt she will touch on these in her Town Hall talk with Dr. Deborah Giles.

    JULY 8-13

    FOOD & DRINK

  22. The Stranger's Burger Week 2019
    Since 2013, The Stranger’s sister publication, the Portland Mercury, has hosted Burger Week, among the most popular seven days of the year for culinary-minded denizens of the City of Roses. Gourmands line up at beloved local establishments to try one-of-a-kind burgers created exclusively for the week—and better yet, they’re only $5 a pop. Now, for the first time ever, Seattle is getting in on the fun with The Stranger’s inaugural edition of Burger Week, featuring restaurants in neighborhoods all over the city: Ballard Brothers Seafood & Burgers/Taco Mama’s, Ben Paris, Broadfork Cafe, Coastline Burgers, Duke’s Seafood & Chowder, FareStart Restaurant and Maslow’s, JaK’s Alehouse, Loretta’s Northwesterner, Lunchbox Lab, Maritime Pacific Brewing Co. & Jolly Roger Taproom, Next Level Burger, Orfeo, Ozzie’s, the Park Pub, Star Brass Works Lounge, Teddy’s Bigger Burgers, Two Doors Down, and Zippy’s Giant Burgers. Gluten-free and vegan eaters will not be left out of the (delicious) festivities—there will be burger options for both. So go forth and chow down (and don’t forget to tip)! JULIANNE BELL

    JULY 9

    MUSIC

  23. Jawbox
    There are some groups that inspire the respect of people you admire, earn rave reviews in well-regarded publications, and record for renowned labels, and yet you just never get around to listening to their music. That’s the case with me and Jawbox, who’ve reunited after a 10-year hiatus. I’ve no valid reasons for ignoring this DC band, which made a lot of rock fans’ 1990s a wild time to be alive. Now that I’m finally hearing Jawbox’s music, I get it. Their surging, coiled songs carry a heroic uplift, punching above their weight like SST-era Hüsker Dü or Helmet with a keener melodic sensibility. I should’ve been heeding all those recommendations from former Stranger music editor Eric Grandy, damn it. DAVE SEGAL

  24. The Struts, The Glorious Sons, The Pink Slips
    U.K.-bred classic rock and embroidered velvet revivalists the Struts will show off their British rock 'n' blues flavor on this stateside tour stop with opening support from the Glorious Sons.

    JULY 9-10

    MUSIC

  25. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial in Concert
    These Seattle Symphony + film matchups are a great way to enliven a cinematic chestnut while drawing in more diverse audiences than what you traditionally find at a classical music concert, pairing a screening with the symphony’s live performance of the film score. This presentation of the 1980s classic—about a sweet lil’ big-headed alien who’s stranded on Earth and the children who are tasked with hiding him while helping him get home—is the next in a series highlighting John Williams’s exquisite music-movie capabilities. LEILANI POLK

    JULY 9-20

    PRIDE

  26. Tacoma Pride
    Keep Pride going at Tacoma's LGBTQ-centered festival, which will fill downtown with vendors, host an outdoor family-friendly party, and sponsor cultural events.

    JULY 10

    FILM

  27. Movies at Marymoor Park
    Once again, BECU will present evenings of outdoor movies plus food trucks and entertainment, kicking off on this July evening with Ferris Bueller’s Day Off and continuing with Bohemian Rhapsody, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, Top Gun, and other favorites.

    JULY 10-11

    READINGS & TALKS

  28. Anthony McCann: Shadowlands
    If you listened to the critically acclaimed Bundyville podcast, then you know the standoff between vanilla ISIS and the FBI was way more than just a strange blip in the news. It was a standoff with roots in disastrous nuclear bomb testing and Mormonism and all kinds of weird-ass western American history. Anthony McCann, a guy I mostly know through the funny and kind of abstract poetry he publishes with Seattle's Wave Books, lends his keen poet's eye to the occupation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in his new book, Shadowlands: Fear and Freedom at the Oregon Standoff. "McCann expands the scope of our understanding of this fraught time in Oregon’s history, and offers a high-stakes analysis of how it has affected our current cultural and political moment," says the press materials. Sign me up! RICH SMITH

    JULY 10-NOVEMBER 3

    VISUAL ART

  29. Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness
    Zanele Muholi is a titan of art and photography. I remember first encountering their photographs of black LGBTQI South Africans in college and being stunned by the honesty, intimacy, and strength that Muholi brought out in their subjects. In a time when being a queer black South African rendered an individual invisible or subject to extreme prejudice and violence, Muholi’s work subverted and exalted this marginalized group of people. In Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness, Muholi becomes the subject, taking staged self-portraits using found materials like pads, cowrie shells, and washing machine tubes to “challenge perceptions of who and where they are.” JASMYNE KEIMIG

    JULY 11

    FOOD & DRINK

  30. Baby Goats & Brews
    In its inaugural year, this fundraiser proved to be an instant sleeper hit, with thousands of people interested on Facebook. Can you blame them? It’s not every day you get a chance to down brews from Reuben’s while consorting with small ruminant critters. At the fourth annual event, guests will get to cuddle baby goats for five minutes—and $1 from every beer, growler, and flight sold that day will go to the volunteer-run charity Puget Sound Goat Rescue, which saves the lives of more than 100 goats every year with its work rescuing, caring for, and finding new homes for goats in need. JULIANNE BELL

    MUSIC

  31. Brit Floyd
    The self-proclaimed world's finest Pink Floyd cover act, Brit Floyd, will come back to Seattle to prove their '70s psych-rock worth in their immersive summer tour.

  32. Greyson Chance, Fleurie
    Ex-teen sensation Greyson Chance is now an adult and touring the country on the wave of his new popular singles. He'll be joined by Fleurie on this tour stop.

    JULY 11-13

    FESTIVALS

  33. Timber! Outdoor Music Festival 2019
    Timber!, Artist Home's popular outdoor music festival thrown out in Carnation, is back for its seventh year with a very full weekend of crowd-friendly folk, rock, and pop performances, and all-ages activities like camping, kayaking, and stargazing. This year's lineup includes San Francisco punks Oh Sees and grunge legend Mark Lanegan, and local stars like Chong the Nomad, Hibou, and Haley Heynderickx. All artists will be split between the Main Stage, the smaller and more intimate Campfire Stage, and Camp Timber for kids and group activities.

    JULY 11-14

    PERFORMANCE

  34. Camptacular!
    Camptacular!, Kitten 'n' Lou's kitschy and super-queer tribute to summer camp, will be back for another year, with illustrious local guests like Stranger Genius Award Winner Cherdonna, burlesque dynamo Waxie Moon, dancers Randy Ford and Markeith Wiley, Minneapolis drag queen Victoria DeVille, and Chicago's JeezLoueez, "The Honey Badger of Burlesque."

    JULY 11-28

    PERFORMANCE

  35. Citizen: An American Lyric
    In Citizen: An American Lyric, Claudia Rankine pushed the collage essay farther than it had gone before in order to tell a story about the way racism shows up in our daily and sometimes hourly lives. The book became one of the many literary bibles people turned to in their effort to figure out why police were still executing so many unarmed black men in the streets, and also introduced many to the concept of microaggressions. I don't know how director Jay O'Leary is going to bring Rankine's multimedia poem-essay to life, but she did a great job steering WET's production of B, so I have high hopes. RICH SMITH

    JULY 11-AUGUST 11

    PERFORMANCE

  36. Wooden O Productions
    Seattle Shakespeare Company will present two free, outdoor plays: an all-male Twelfth Night for the comedic half (directed by Mary Machala) and a no-male Romeo and Juliet (directed by Leah Adcock-Starr) for the tragic counterpart. Catch them in Seattle and all around the Sound.

    JULY 11-AUGUST 15

    PERFORMANCE

  37. Nights at the Neptune: A People's Theatre Joint
    The Neptune will lend its stage to speakers, dancers, and artists who address the most urgent social and racial issues of our time. This year, look forward to International African Stage, a One Vibe Africa concert featuring great musicians like Naomi Wachira, DJ Topspin, Yirim Seck, Silas Blak, Yaddi Bojia, Simon Okelo, Ancient Robotz, and Djeliyah Band; The Narrative: Don't Teach Me No Nonsense, Felicia Loud and Jace ECAj's "commentary on the devolution of hip-hop by mainstays of the Seattle arts community"; Kole Galbraith's experimental musical showcase Mixed Resonance, featuring headliner Zachary James Watkins; the theater piece Sabeyet, created and directed by Adam Jabari; La Espiritista's book release for Butterfly: Una Transformación; and Jeff Shulman and Steven Fong's documentary On the Brink, about the rapid changes affecting the onetime bastion of Seattle's black community, the Central District.

    JULY 11-AUGUST 22

    VISUAL ART

  38. Summer at SAM: Thursdays and Saturdays in the Park
    These Thursday and Saturday events offer family-friendly arts programming throughout the park, including yoga, zumba, tours, shows, workshops, food, and more.

    JULY 11-SEPTEMBER 8

    PERFORMANCE

  39. Decadent Delights
    Enjoy Teatro ZinZanni's winning combination of tasty dinner and circus antics—this time combined quite literally! A Maestro chef struggles to create the perfect meal with the aid of Madame ZinZanni, despite the shenanigans of a host of acrobats. Co-starring comedian Kevin Kent and singer Maiya Sykes (Postmodern Jukebox, The Voice), along with "comedian and yodeling dominatrix" Manuela Horn, illusionist Voronin, "contortionist-puppet Svetlana," aerial acrobat Ling Rui, performing artist Maxim Voronin, and the two trapeze artists of Die Maiers.

    JULY 12

    COMEDY

  40. Frankie Quiñones
    Viral star Quiñones takes on multiple stage personas—himself, fitness guru Creeper, and the melodramatic Juanita Carmelita.

    FESTIVALS

  41. PBJam Fest 2019
    Equally billing all their artists and prioritizing loud and proud jam bands, the PBJam Fest will feature a ton of PNW groups who will bring the funk this summer (as well as the jazz and bluegrass). Participating groups will include Buzz Brump, Crack Sabbath, Fresh Track, Skerik Band, World's Finest, Cytrus, High Pulp, Living Daylights, Swindler, Unsinkable Heavies, the High Seagrass, Spare Rib & the Bluegrass Sauce, and more.

    FILM

  42. 'Crawl' Opening
    Climate change is bad enough without gigantic, bloodthirsty alligators lurking in the hurricane floodwaters, as Kaya Scodelario learns in this Sam Raimi-produced horror thriller.

  43. 'Stuber' Opening
    Kumail Nanjiani plays an unassuming Uber driver who's dragged into a counterterrorism operation by a hard-boiled detective.

  44. 'The Farewell' Opening
    If you had a fatal disease, would you want to know? This question lies at the heart of a 2016 This American Life segment called “What You Don’t Know” by Lulu Wang. Her 80-year-old grandmother, known as Nai Nai, had been diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer and given three months to live. Her family decided not to tell her she was sick at all. Now Wang has written and directed a film, The Farewell, based on her family’s experience. It features Awkwafina, the wonderful rapper and actor, in her first starring role. GILLIAN ANDERSON

    MUSIC

  45. Queen with Adam Lambert
    This bill is utterly wrong, of course. Sure, Adam Lambert has a great voice, a great face, and a great body. The former American Idol contestant is out and has taken his lumps for it. What Lambert does not have is what RuPaul called the TP, the Total Package. The TP in this case concerns the late Queen vocalist Farrokh Bulsara, who turned himself into Freddie Mercury, dazzled the world, dosed the faithful and anyone else within earshot with excess, and buried his non-Caucasianness deeper than his queerness (on the latter, he’d drop hints with a wink or the aesthetic equivalent—but no one could ask him about family). Mercury hid in plain sight, signified in plain sight, and died from AIDS in shame. Go to this concert if you want spectacle. You’ll get it, but you won’t get history. ANDREW HAMLIN

  46. Smokey Robinson
    My mother was in town recently for a ridiculous amount of time, and one night over dinner she asked what I was working on. I told her I needed to write up a thing about Smokey Robinson’s upcoming show, and she and my sister immediately cooed in unison: “Smokey, our favorite!” There’s no other appropriate reaction to this man. You either love him with your whole heart, deeply appreciate his foundational influence and industry-altering contributions to soul and pop, and generally melt for his lilting honeyed tones, or you know nothing about anything. Openly cherish this national treasure while he’s still around. You never what 2019 has in store for our favorites. KIM SELLING

    PERFORMANCE

  47. DANCE This 2019
    After an intense collaboration with community and international artists, teens and adults will perform three new dance works for the 21st iteration of this annual series.

    READINGS & TALKS

  48. Lisa Taddeo: Three Women
    Journalist Taddeo's detailed portraits of the sexual lives of three American women—a frustrated Indiana homemaker, a North Dakotan teen betrayed by her married English teacher, and an East Coast hotwife—are based on eight years of research across the country. O, The Oprah Magazine and Dave Eggers are impressed by its depth and range, so maybe you will be, too.

    JULY 12-14

    COMEDY

  49. Eddie Izzard: Wunderbar
    Jesus and the dinosaurs. Darth Vader in the Death Star cafeteria. Eddie Izzard has so many brilliant classic bits, but the comedian/film actor/linguaphile/EU activist has never stopped loading new tricks up his sleeve. This latest tour, his first since 2015's multilingual, 45-country Force Majeure, is apparently about "everything from humans over the last 100,000 years to talking dogs and animal superheroes."

    FESTIVALS

  50. Ballard SeafoodFest
    Originally started as a celebration of the neighborhood’s fishing industry in 1974, this festival has expanded over the years to include a salmon dinner, a crab shack, a beer garden replete with local craft brews like Stoup Brewing and Reuben's Brews, food and artisan craft vendors, and music. This year's music lineup includes Welsh alternative rock band the Joy Formidable, Portland-based singer/songwriter Kyle Craft, and Everett folk rockers the Moondoggies, among many others. Gluttons for punishment can enroll in the lutefisk eating contest, an annual competition to see who can scarf the most of the salty, gelatinous fish.

  51. West Seattle Summer Fest
    For the 37th year, spend some time shopping, dancing to live music from great local bands, doing yoga in the park, dining, drinking in beer gardens, and enjoying other summery activities at this annual family-friendly festival. This year's headliners include Jenn Champion, Polyrhythmics, Blackie, Common Market, Night Beats, Jeremy Enigk, Spirit Award, and Stas THEE Boss. The newest addition this year is a whole block of giant games like Connect Four, Jenga, Ker Plunk, Dominoes, and more.

    FOOD & DRINK

  52. Seattle International Beerfest
    This three-day specialty beer fest boasts everything from classic beers like pilsners and pales to anything "delicious yet shunned by the masses," including double IPAs, barleywines, farmhouse ales, and sours, with breweries hailing from all over the world. There's also a lush grass area on which to unfurl picnic blankets, in addition to ample indoor and outdoor seating. Deal-seekers, take note: At the Grande Beer Garden, you can grab full pints, including Pilsner Urquell, Hop Valley Citrus Mistress, and Crispin Cider Company, for just three tickets ($3) and take your pint anywhere in the park.

    MUSIC

  53. Harry Potter & The Prisoner of Azkaban in Concert
    The Seattle Symphony will take on the cultural phenomenon with a performance of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, providing the audience with a chance to relive the magic of the film in high-definition on a giant screen amid John Williams’ unforgettable score.

    JULY 12-AUGUST 3

    FOOD & DRINK

  54. Hawaiian Nights
    The illustrious Seattle fine-dining institution Canlis, known for its extravagant New Year's Eve blowouts and other hot-ticket events (like pop-up collabs with Shake Shack and Milk Bar), has launched its newest event series: a poolside pop-up in their parking lot (!). They're tight-lipped as always about details, promising "fire, booze, and un-fancy, laidback, lowbrow vibes," but the following may make an appearance: thatched tiki huts, a pig roast, a bar, pizza, kalbi ribs, shishito peppers, and mac salad. Their event page also helpfully suggests, "You may want to bring a bathing suit."

    JULY 12-AUGUST 17

    PERFORMANCE

  55. GreenStage: Backyard Bard and Shakespeare in the Park

    For even more outdoor Shakespeare (in addition to Wooden O productions), check out plein-air performances by GreenStage: full-length stagings of the history play Henry IV: Part 2 (directed by Chris Shea with gender-flexible casting) and the comedy Taming of the Shrew (directed with a feminist twist by Jennifer Crooks)—plus "Backyard Bard"'s one-hour, four-player versions of Measure for Measure and The Merry Wives of Windsor.

    JULY 13

    FESTIVALS

  56. Lucerne Seafair Milk Carton Derby
    You'd be forgiven for thinking that a milk carton derby entails individual milk cartons fashioned into miniature boats, but you would be mistaken. This Seafair tradition—which started in 1972 and bills itself as a "quirky celebration of creativity, science, and boatmanship"—invites crafty community members to use a bunch of milk cartons to assemble vessels sturdy enough to hold human bodies. The participants then paddle their creations on Green Lake to win prizes.

    FOOD & DRINK

  57. 14th Annual Summer Beer Taste: Beerstock
    To mark a half-century since Woodstock, the Phinney Neighborhood Festival will throw a festival of their own with tastes from over 30 local microbreweries and cideries.

  58. PROOF - Washington Distillers Festival
    Washington has the third highest number of micro-distilleries in the nation. At this festival, you can sip small-batch craft spirits from more than 40 distilleries from our state, who will provide all the usual suspects, like gin, whiskey, vodka, and bourbon, as well as more obscure spirits, like aquavit, amari, grappa, absinthe, and others. Local food vendors, including restaurants like Adana, Agrodolce, and Le Coin, will provide sustenance as a ballast for all the booze.

    MUSIC

  59. Beck, Cage the Elephant, Spoon, Starcrawler
    I might not always love what Beck Hansen does (I prefer the groove-hawking, alt-hip-hop experimenter and upbeat art-pop pusher to the somber, introspective songwriter), but I respect him deeply and I've been digging on his latest output—2017’s Colors had some hot joints, including “Wow” prior to its oversaturation, and latest single, the dance-funky-banjo-sampled vocal-oohhing “Saw Lightning,” is a fine bopping collab with Pharrell Williams that precedes the release of his 14th album, Hyperspace. Co-headliner Cage the Elephant are one of those garage-and-psych-vibing alternative bands picked up by mainstream rock radio that I can’t help but like—“Trouble,” “Come a Little Closer,” “Cold Cold Cold”? Those dudes write mean hooks and catchy riffs. They also teamed up with Beck for the dub-thumping “Night Running” off new Social Cues LP, which has likely been spurring live onstage collabs on their current tour. Austin’s fine Britt Daniel–led indie rockers Spoon support, and LA punk outfit Starcrawler open the show. LEILANI POLK

  60. Cate Le Bon, Conscious Summary
    Right from her first album, 2009’s Me Oh My, Welsh singer-songwriter Cate Le Bon established herself as a distinctive force in underground rock. As I wrote about her sophomore album, Cyrk, Le Bon, like the late Trish Keenan of Broadcast, “radiates a stern, enigmatic charisma that never wears out its welcome.” There’s also some Sandy Denny–esque pastoral grace to Le Bon’s voice, which enhances her bittersweetly melodic art-rock songs. As with Pavement’s, her tunes carry both familiar and skewed elements that enable them to sound fresh in a genre where freshness is not exactly rampant. Le Bon is on tour supporting the new, lushly beautiful Reward LP. DAVE SEGAL

  61. Rodrigo y Gabriela
    Rodrigo Sánchez and Gabriela Quintero have been pushing out instrumental-guitar-driven duets, mostly minus a full band, for more than 18 years. They both wield acoustic axes, and employ choppy technicality and stylistic qualities that complement each other—Rodrigo is the quicksilver picker and fret-jumper, Gabriela the strummer with intense rhythmicality, and both bust out beats on the bodies of their guitars. While their sound is clearly rooted in the flamenco of their Mexico City home, both were weaned on rock, heavy metal, and jazz—and elements from all three come out in their playing and the covers that show up on their albums (like Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” off their self-titled LP) and live performances (e.g., a medley of Metallica’s “One” and Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five”). LEILANI POLK

    PERFORMANCE

  62. 'Lore' Podcast Live
    Writer, host, and producer of the podcasts Lore and Cabinet of Curiosities, Aaron Mahnke will share his spooky folkloric storytelling with a live audience.

    VISUAL ART

  63. Hot Off the Press Book Fair
    Seattle's world-renowned Fantagraphics Books, known for their boundary-pushing cartoons and graphic novels, will host their annual Hot Off the Press book fair, featuring appearances by guest artists like Berlin-based Ulli Lust, Americans Zak Sally and Joshua Ray Stephens, Coin-op Books from Brooklyn, and many other small publishers and artists. The artwork will stay up during the Hot Off the Press Exhibition.

    JULY 13-14

    FOOD & DRINK

  64. Rooted: The Past and Future of the Black Farmer
    For July's edition of his ever-popular Midnight Mecca dinner series, sought-after chef Tarik Abdullah will create a completely vegan six-course tasting menu with ingredients sourced from black farmers and local urban farms. Damon Bomar of Brown Liquor Cocktail Company will provide cocktails, wine, and shrubs for the pairings.

    PERFORMANCE

  65. Seattle Outdoor Theater Festival 2019
    Theater is alive in Seattle, but, as in most places, it generally isn't cheap. GreenStage, Theater Schmeater, and Wooden O Productions set out to change that in 2001 with the first Outdoor Theater Festival. Watch Shakespeare plays and more contemporary pieces from the festival's founders and other theater companies—a total of nine, also including Shakespeare Northwest, Last Leaf Productions, the 14/48 Projects, Dacha Theatre, Freehold Theater, and Young Shakespeare Workshop, plus aerial performances by Versatile Arts—over what will hopefully be a sunny weekend.

    JULY 13-NOVEMBER 3

    VISUAL ART

  66. Carrie Yamaoka: recto/verso
    New York–based artist Carrie Yamaoka’s work is molten, glass-like, distorted as if you’re looking into a fun-house mirror. She skips the traditional canvas and wood panels, opting instead to compose a lot of her work using resin or reflective Mylar. The result is a slipperiness of both form and style: The material is the thing. In recto/verso, the exhibition covers Yamaoka’s work from the early 1990s to the present, including some of her early text-based explorations and chemically altered photos. JASMYNE KEIMIG

    JULY 14

    COMMUNITY

  67. Gay Day at Wild Waves 2019
    The Imperial Sovereign Court Of Seattle will set up at the summery theme park for an all-day party full of drag performances, food vendors ("with prices lower than those in the park"), and a beer garden. All vendors will donate their proceeds to charities of their choice.

    FOOD & DRINK

  68. Burning Beast 2019
    Spearheaded by James Beard Award–winning chef Tamara Murphy of Terra Plata, Burning Beast is something like the Pacific Northwest’s gastronomic answer to Burning Man: A sampling of Seattle’s best and brightest culinary luminaries gather off the grid at a retired dairy farm for a blazing bacchanalia, and a towering animal effigy is set alight in a ritual sacrifice of sorts. To really tap into their primal side, chefs use only fire to prepare a feast of sustainably raised meats, fish, and vegetables. This year’s festivities feature Melissa Miranda of Musang, Mutsuko Soma of Kamonegi and Hannyatou, Mike Easton of Il Corvo and Il Nido, Jack Timmons of Jack’s BBQ, John Sundstrom and Rosie Cisneros of Lark, and others. JULIANNE BELL

    HOLIDAYS

  69. Bastille Day
    Bastille Day, or French National Day, recognizes both the 1789 Storming of the Bastille and the Fête de la Fédération, which celebrated the unity of the French people in 1790. Find all the ways to celebrate on our Bastille Day calendar, including with cocktails and sparkling wine at Maximilien and with live music, burlesque, and street performers at Cafe Campagne.

    MUSIC

  70. Bad Religion, Dave Hause & The Mermaid
    I’m too old to have ’00s pop-punk/Epitaph nostalgia, so when I look back at my teenage years and consider Bad Religion, I never, EVER would have imagined they’d become hugely popular a full decade AFTER their first LP, or that they’d STILL be playing today AND the lineup would include former Minor Threat/Dag Nasty guitarist Brian Baker! Well, in the ’90s, Bad Religion codified their sound into a tight, clean version of early-’80s SoCal hardcore, and, along with grad-school thesis-level narratives, they simply continued on unflinchingly and successfully touring and recording new records. Not bad, fellers, way to keep from having to retire! MIKE NIPPER

  71. Common, Nicole Bus
    Touring on the release of his latest book Let Love Have The Last Word, Common, an award-winning hip-hop artist, actor, and activist, will read selections of his work and perform alongside support from up and coming soul singer Nicole Bus.

  72. Slightly Stoopid, Matisyahu, Tribal Seeds, HIRIE
    The seven-piece Ocean Beach group Slightly Stoopid, plus Matisyahu, Tribal Seeds, and HIRIE, will generate their big-rock, reggae-inspired, canna-happy vibes for the Marymoor Park Summer Concert Series.

    READINGS & TALKS

  73. Queer Press Fest
    Scrappy and individualistic, yet community-focused: It's no wonder that the zine format is beloved by queer artists. The underground gallery Push/Pull, in association this year with Emerald Comics Distro, will once again host LGBTQ+ zine and print creators at a daylong pop-up market and celebration. Special guests will include idiosyncratic local artists like Kassandra Davis (with the autobiographical Mockery and Vodka), Ignatz Award–nominated Craig Hurd-McKenney, trans artist Hayden Stern, and writer and comix maker Anne Bean, plus Indianan "queer and grief comics" artist Ileana Haberman-Ducey. Their zines will delight your queer eyes, and there will be free stickers, books, and other merch. Feel free to bring the kids—there will be plenty of clearly designated family-friendly zines and books. JOULE ZELMAN

    VISUAL ART

  74. Georgetown Garden Walk
    Stroll the streets of the historic Georgetown neighborhood to admire its gardens and art, explore its shops and restaurants, and hear live music on this self-guided tour.

    JULY 14 & 21

    SPORTS & RECREATION

  75. Seattle Sounders 2019 Home Games
    This month, Seattle's Major League Soccer team's home games will include matches against Atlanta United (July 14) and the Portland Timbers (July 21).

    JULY 16

    MUSIC

  76. Jon Bellion, Marc E. Bassy, Lawrence
    Citing long-lasting musical influences like Andre 3000 and Kanye West, pop and hip-hop blender Jon Bellion will return to Seattle on his Glory Sound Prep tour, playing music from his latest effort of the same name.

    JULY 17

    MUSIC

  77. Slash ft. Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators
    Original Guns 'n' Roses guitarist and generic '80s rock god Slash will return to Seattle on tour with his new collaborative band Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators in support of their third album, Living the Dream.

  78. We Were Promised Jetpacks, Catholic Action
    Scottish rockers We Were Promised Jetpacks will celebrate the 10th anniversary of their debut album, These Four Walls, with a tour through the U.S. On this Seattle stop, they'll be joined by Catholic Action.

    JULY 18

    MUSIC

  79. The Raconteurs
    To say that Lazaretto, Jack White's second solo album, is the best thing he's done since the White Stripes will sound like high praise to those charmed by the busman's holiday twofer of the Raconteurs and Dead Weather, but lyrics don't get much worse than "I've got a rabbit, it likes to hop/I've got a girl and she likes to shop" (the Raconteurs' "Intimate Secretary"). If anything, I lost interest in the Stripes circa Icky Thump, a sketch of a record. Near as I could tell, they had, too. If White's debut, Blunderbuss, failed to burnish or destroy his rep, the follow-up reveals a reinvigorated musician. Sure, he’s spent the past few years badmouthing a few colleagues, but niceness doesn't always breed the best rock 'n' roll. KATHY FENNESSY

    JULY 18-21

    COMEDY

  80. Ali Wong: The Milk & Money Tour
    LA comic Ali Wong, who's been all over TV (Black Box, Inside Amy Schumer, Chelsea Lately) and occasionally in the movies (Always Be My Maybe, Savages), is probably best-loved for her jokes: about being a child of immigrants (on the necessity of purse hooks: "My mom didn't come to this country so I could shit with my backpack on"), men (Asian men "smell like responsibility"), money (wanting to get to a financial position where she can afford sliced Whole Foods mango—"That's how you know you've made it. When you're eating mango that was sliced by a dude named Noah.") Not too long ago, she filmed a stand-up special while seven months pregnant—to the delight of critics. She'll be worth seeing live.

    JULY 18-AUGUST 10

    PERFORMANCE

  81. The Events
    A handful of arts patrons and US Bank are funding free tickets for all who want to see Intiman's production of David Greig's The Events, directed by Paul Budraitis. Greig's play is a look at the aftermath of a deadly mass shooting. The show features two actors and a chorus, which, as in all the Greek tragedies, represents the figure of the general populace. (In this case, a rotating cast of local community choirs will play the chorus.) Claire is a priest who witnessed the mass shooting, and "the Boy" doubles as the shooter and Claire's boyfriend/psychiatrist. The shooting in the play, according to a favorable review in the New York Times, was inspired by the racist terrorism of Anders Behring Breivik, who killed 77 people in 2011. RICH SMITH

    JULY 18-AUGUST 24

    VISUAL ART

  82. Claudia Fitch: Raincoat
    Award-winning sculptor Fitch has been making public art in Seattle since the '90s, messing around with art history, pop culture, and the female form. In 2011, The Stranger's Jen Graves wrote of her porcelain torsos: "They strike me as the kind of sculpture that would be produced by a matriarchy." In the past few years, she's fashioned torsos and clothed headless women in casual stances, creamers and stands made of women's bottom and top halves, and more abstract pieces emphasizing generous forms and unusual takes on femininity.

  83. Juventino Aranda: In Dreams I Once Believed there was a Future
    On the occasion of Aranda's first museum show, last year's Pocket Full of Posies at the Frye, critic Emily Pothast wrote, "The child of Mexican immigrants, Aranda marries the activist spirit of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta with a cool, conceptual post-minimalism to explore how ideology is communicated visually." We're looking forward to seeing more of Aranda's conceptual sculptures, textile art, and altered objects.

    JULY 18-OCTOBER 27

    VISUAL ART

  84. Bart at TAM: Animating America's Favorite Family
    This unauthorized look at the first 13 seasons of The Simpsons features 100 animation cels, scripts, and drawings.

    JULY 19

    FILM

  85. 'The Lion King' Opening
    The 3D-animated adaptation of Disney's beloved Hamlet-with-lions saga looks like it'll be a much bigger success than the new Aladdin. Judging from the trailer, it seems to be a shot-for-shot remake of the original, but with vastly more realistic and beautiful animation, plus a prestigious voice cast including Donald Glover, James Earl Jones, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Seth Rogen, Keegan-Michael Key, John Oliver, and Shahadi Wright Joseph (from Us).

    JULY 19-20

    READINGS & TALKS

  86. Mueller Report Live
    Locals will spend 24 hours live-reading the Mueller Report on interference in the 2016 election. After the marathon, relieve stress with a party.

    JULY 19-21

    FESTIVALS

  87. 2019 Seafair Indian Days Powwow
    This 32nd annual Seafair tradition hosted by United Tribes of All Indians brings together Native American tribes from all over the Pacific Northwest for three days of Indian cooking, jewelry-making, live music, and traditional dancing.

  88. Bite of Seattle
    Year-round, Seattle is filled with festivals devoted to niche food and drink offerings, but if there’s one event that everyone knows about, it’s the Bite of Seattle, a free event at Seattle Center that’s been going strong since 1982 and claims to attract more than 400,000 guests annually. Seattle’s “original & largest food and beverage showcase” rounds up food from more than 60 restaurants and pop-up vendors. There’s also craft beer and cider tastings, a restaurant showcase benefiting Food Lifeline, live cooking demonstrations, and cook-off battles on the “Bite Cooks” stage. And when you can’t eat anymore, head to the free outdoor movie night on Friday or one of three music stages for live performances from bands.

  89. Capitol Hill Block Party 2019
    Capitol Hill Block Party is a large-scale weekend music festival that originally started as a charming neighborhood get-together and has since morphed into a massive spectacle of Top-40 headliners and Seattle heavy hitters converging during the dog days of summer in the Pike/Pine corridor. The complete lineup for CHBP 2019 features more than 60 touring and local talents—including headliners like future-bass producer RL Grime, beat-heavy alt-poppers Phantogram, and twerking-flautist phenom Lizzo, mid-range artists like indie heartbreak queen Mitski, bedroom pop savant Cuco, and ambient house project Shallou, and Seattle stunners like soul-rockers the Black Tones, hooky punks Tres Leches, and up-and-coming dance pop crafter PSA.

  90. Lunar Block Party
    As part of Seattle's Summer of Space, venture to Tukwila for a three-day 50th anniversary celebration of the moon landing, where you'll get to witness a performance by American Idol season 17 winner Laine Hardy, chat with space experts, and much more.

  91. Sequim Lavender Festival
    After a long winter hibernation, the lavender fields of Sequim come abloom to soothe the souls and nasal passages of passersby. Take in the sights, shop for lavender goods, and more.

  92. Vashon Island Strawberry Festival
    Despite its name, the Vashon Strawberry Festival brings a lot more than sweet red fruits. The 109-year-old community event also brings a car show, live music, local artists, a carnival, a beer garden, pancake breakfasts, and much more for the whole family.

    MUSIC

  93. Chicago
    Classic rock legends Chicago are back this summer to showcase some of their greatest hits.

    JULY 19-AUGUST 11

    PERFORMANCE

  94. 7th and Jackson
    Three friends from different communities in the International District dream of having their own nightclub. Even when Pearl Harbor is bombed and the country gears up for war, they swear loyalty to their visions. This musical takes place over three decades in one of the most fascinating parts of Seattle.

  95. The Year of Magical Thinking
    One of the deepest and most affecting memoirs of grief of this century so far, Joan Didion's 2005 book The Year of Magical Thinking recounts the torments and irrationalities of her existence after the death of her husband and her daughter's illness and decline. Sheila Daniels will direct this one-woman solo adaptation.

    JULY 20

    FESTIVALS

  96. Night Nation Run Seattle
    At the "world's first running music festival," runners will wait for nightfall to make their way along a 5k course punctuated by party zones full of live EDM music and interactive light shows. Prepare to get glowy and sweaty.

    FILM

  97. Seattle Outdoor Cinema
    First Tech Federal Credit Union's outdoor movie series (this month's film is Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure) will also feature a night market, yard games, and beer, and proceeds go to charity. You have to be over 21 to partake.

    MUSIC

  98. Deerhunter, Dirty Projectors
    Bradford Cox, of Atlas Sound and experimental-rock outfit Deerhunter, threw out the rock-star playbook years ago. One minute, he's a hazy-pop purveyor (2008's Microcastle); the next, a brash garage rocker (2013's Monomania). Deerhunter's recent record, Fading Frontier, which features Broadcast's James Cargill, reconciles his multiple personalities to uneven, if intriguing effect. If "Snakeskin" rocks like John Lee Hooker on Ecstasy, other songs conjure up Peter Gabriel in silvery-synth mode. KATHY FENNESSY

    JULY 20-21

    SHOPPING

  99. Renegade Craft Fair
    Every summer, hundreds of crafters from around the region gather in Seattle for the Renegade Craft Fair, a pop-up event with a mission, according to the organizers, to “unite a widespread community of creatives with an engaged fanbase by producing inclusive, vibrant events that illuminate and reflect the contemporary craft movement in support of the creative economy.” It’s also a great place to find gifts for others (or, more importantly, yourself). KATIE HERZOG

    JULY 20-AUGUST 24

    FILM

  100. Dressed to the Nines: Cinema Style
    Singin' in the Rain is the first film in SIFF's upcoming summer series Dressed to the Nines: Cinema Style. The six-week-long showcase of fashion and costuming at the height of Old Hollywood's studio system continues with Mildred Pierce (1945), 42nd Street (1933), Gilda (1946), The Women (1939), and Rear Window (1954). The series was thought up by Rosemarie and Vince Keenan. The Keenans have been involved with SIFF's Noir City film festival since it began in 2007. "We couldn't help noticing how interested those audiences were in the style of noir, not only the overall look of the film but the clothes themselves," the Keenans said over e-mail. Said Nick Bruno, SIFF's public cinema programs manager: "What I really appreciated about Rosemarie and Vince's idea was that it chose to ignore film directors [...] and chose instead to focus on an entirely different technician of sorts"—the costume designer. CHASE BURNS

    THROUGH JULY 21

    PERFORMANCE

  101. Venardos Circus
    This animal-free circus with a Broadway musical-style format promises aerialists, acrobats, jugglers, contortionists, comedy, "daredevilry," magic, and more.

    JULY 21

    FESTIVALS

  102. Northwest Thrift-Con
    Vintage and streetwear dealers and designers will gather in Tacoma with their one-of-a-kind wares in tow. There will also be food, cocktails, and DJs.

    FOOD & DRINK

  103. Lamb and Rosé 2019
    In her book A Boat, a Whale & a Walrus: Menus and Stories, chef Renee Erickson writes that she’s always harbored a fondness for rosé, ever since it first started gaining popularity in the United States, and has long appreciated its ability to stand up to foods that “other wines can’t.” One such food is lamb. Because a leg of lamb was too time-consuming to offer as a regular menu dish, Erickson and her colleagues at Boat Street Cafe conceived a joyful, family-style dinner party of lamb and rosé for a special feast. And the tradition stuck. The dinner takes place every July, usually on a night that Erickson describes as “the kind of warm summer evening that brings a whisper of salt air in from Puget Sound.” This year’s festivities will feature applewood-roasted lamb cooked in the Whale Wins’ wood-fired oven. Over the years, the event has evolved, but some things remain constant: Guests can always count on a never-ending flow of pale pink wine and lots of dancing.

    MUSIC

  104. Cody Johnson, Whitey Morgan
    Cody Johnson's 2014 album Cowboy Like Me earned him the attention of Nashville bigwigs, and he's been crooning country originals with solid instrumentation and easygoing melodies ever since.

  105. Reel Big Fish, Bowling for Soup, Mest
    For y’all pop punk and third wave ska-rnivorous kids who came of age in the mid-1990s, it looks like tonight might be the time to re-pierce yer bottom lip and/or eyebrow, dig out your porkpie hat, and see if them wide-legged short britches and braces still fit! Uh, who’d have ever thunk third wave ska would still be a thing two decades later? Well, here it is and still skankin’. We got Mest and Bowling for Soup joining up with the late-1990s sing-along ska group who are surprisingly as popular as ever, Reel Big Fish. MIKE NIPPER

    JULY 22

    READINGS & TALKS

  106. Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton: Shapes of Native Nonfiction
    Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton will present their anthology of essays by 27 Native writers, which is inspired in form and theme by the traditional art of basket weaving. They take off on the idea of "coiling and plaiting" to structure this collection.

    JULY 23

    FILM

  107. 48 Hour Film Festival
    Dozens of teams of Seattle fly filmmakers had only 48 hours to make a film, and now you can watch the results on the big screen. Winning films will go on to Filmapalooza and Cannes 2019 Short Film Corner.

    MUSIC

  108. Beast Coast, Joey Bada$$, Flatbush Zombies, The Underachievers, Kirk Knight, Nyck Caution, Powers Pleasant, CJ Fly
    Beast Coast is a new hip-hop supergroup, cast from the energies of Pro Era, Flatbush Zombies, and the Underachievers. They'll hit the road this summer to promote their latest tracks on their Escape From New York Tour.

  109. Rockstar Energy Drink DISRUPT Festival
    Thrash around this summer to punk and rock groups like the Used, Thrice, Circa Survive, Sum 41, the Story So Far, Atreyu, Sleeping With Sirens, Andy Black, Four Year Strong, Memphis May Fire, Trophy Eyes, Meg & Dia, Juliet Simms, and Hyro the Hero at this Rockstar-sponsored touring arena festival.

    READINGS & TALKS

  110. Clarion West Presents Jack Dann and Jonathan Strahan
    Two World Fantasy Award-winners who are teaching at Clarion West's Writers Workshop will read their excellent speculative work. Most recently, Strahan presided over the anthologies The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume 13 and Mission: Critical; he's also edited works by Alastair Reynolds, R.A. Lafferty, Saad Z. Hossein, Catherynne M. Valente, and many other prominent fantasists and sci-fi authors. Dann has more than 75 books to his name as either author or editor and is an Esteemed Knight of the Mark Twain Society.

  111. Kristen Arnett: Mostly Dead Things
    Arnett amassed a large following, in part, for refusing to reveal the location of a lizard to 7-Eleven's corporate Twitter account because she didn't want to "narc" on her new reptilian friend, whom she had met during the course of her regular wine run to the convenience store. The only thing more Florida than that is her debut novel, Mostly Dead Things. We begin with a father's bloody suicide in the family's taxidermy shop. In her grief, his wife begins to "make aggressively lewd art with the taxidermied animals," according to press materials. His son retreats from life. That leaves his daughter, Jessa-Lynn Morton, to run the family business and to deal with everybody's damage. This is one of the most highly anticipated novels of the year because, in addition to being a loyal friend of lizards, Arnett is one of the funniest, most beguiling writers to emerge from that strange state, south of the south, since Padgett Powell. Read any of her dispatches from her days as a law librarian in Maitland, Fla., and you'll see what I mean. RICH SMITH

    JULY 23-AUGUST 10

    PERFORMANCE

  112. Oedipus the King
    Play Your* Part is a theater company that partners with nonprofits to bring productions to underserved, "under-invited" communities. For this ASL-incorporating adaptation of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, perhaps one of the most fundamental works of Western literature, Play Your* Part will partner with the journalist nonprofit Investigate West. They'll stage the play, which is lensed through "archetypes of various religions and cultures," on the steps of the cathedral.

    JULY 24

    FOOD & DRINK

  113. Game of Chefs
    When you play the Game of Thrones, you win or you die. Luckily, the stakes of Game of Chefs, Seattle Business Network’s cutthroat culinary competition in which Iron Chef meets the Iron Throne, are not quite so dire. In a Chopped-style cook-off, chefs from Seattle Restaurant Week will duke it out using a basket of Seattle Made products and a pantry of local ingredients, with the top chef crowned by local celebrity judges and the audience. This year will feature chef Kimberly Cosway of Heartwood Provisions, chef Kristi Brown of That Brown Girl Cooks!, and chef Kevin J David of Orfeo. Guests can try bites, signature cocktails, beer, and wine; mingle with the participating chefs and producers, and purchase Seattle Made products.

    MUSIC

  114. $UICIDEBOY$, Shoreline Mafia, City Morgue, GERM, Night Lovell, Trash Talk
    Sink into a night of critically thinking about the point of your existence, to the tune of southern trap, thanks to New Orleans-based hiphop group $uicideboy$, currently on their Grey Day Tour with support from Shoreline Mafia, City Morgue, GERM, Night Lovell, and Trash Talk.

  115. Frank Iero & The Future Violents, Geoffrey Rickly
    Ex-My Chemical Romance axeman Frank Iero will return with his solo punk project Frank Iero and the Future Violents, with a support set by Geoffrey Rickly.

    JULY 25

    MUSIC

  116. 21 Savage, DaBaby
    While featuring beats similar to Future’s muddled yet airy trap anthems, 21 Savage's flow is far more animated and dexterous. NICK ZURKO

  117. Martina McBride
    Country-pop star Martina McBride began her career in the early '90s with RCA Records and hasn't stopped gigging and sharing her neo-traditionalist hits with the world since.

  118. Michael McDonald & Chaka Khan
    Smooth rock and blues king Michael McDonald and soul queen Chaka Khan stack a double headliner bill at the Chateau this summer.

    JULY 25-27

    MUSIC

  119. Jazz Port Townsend Festival
    Here is what you have to do: drive down to the ferry dock, drive onto a ferry, cross the bay on this ferry, exit the ferry, drive across the island, cross some bridges, stop at a gas station for something fried, salty, and not good for you, eventually enter Port Townsend, and, before heading to Fort Worden State Park, admire a number of the town’s Victorian-style homes. When you finally park your car in the pretty park, roll down your window and listen to jazz music from the Jazz Port Townsend Festival in the sun-brightened air. Cars were not made for the city, but for short trips like this. CHARLES MUDEDE

    JULY 25-28

    FILM

  120. Seattle Transmedia & Independent Film Festival
    STIFF will spend a weekend celebrating digital storytelling, with a program exploring the cultural importance of technology and highlighting work created specifically for digital platforms—including features, video games, short films and music videos, and virtual reality.

    JULY 26

    COMEDY

  121. Kristina Kuzmic: The Hope and Humor Tour
    Fans of the world of parenting vlogs are likely to be familiar with Kristina Kuzmic, who has amassed a couple million YouTube followers through humor and motivational speaking. You can hear her in the flesh in Tacoma tonight.

    FILM

  122. 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' Opening
    It's another Quentin Tarantino bouquet of charismatic stars, with Leonardo DiCaprio playing an aging Hollywood hunk in the late 1960s and Brad Pitt as his double. Co-starring Damon Herriman as Charles Manson and Margot Robbie as Sharon Tate, so you know it's going somewhere dark. Also appearing: Kurt Russell, Dakota Fanning, Al Pacino, Emile Hirsch, Bruce Dern, and basically everyone else.

    FOOD & DRINK

  123. Tasting Flight Presented by Alaska Airlines
    Make wandering through the Woodland Park Zoo's exhibits extra fun by sipping wine from over 60 different wineries while you stroll.

    MUSIC

  124. KUBE 93.3 Summer Jam
    Keenon Daequan Ray Jackson, better known as YG, emerged as one of the best contemporary gangsta rappers when he burst onto the scene with his DJ Mustard-produced debut, My Krazy Life. Praised as an astute storyteller of life on the streets of Compton, YG has never shied away from blending boasts and politics, becoming a real-as-fuck voice against the Trump administration with "FDT." His third and most recent studio outing, Stay Dangerous, finds YG reuniting with Mustard. The rapper's take on G-funk has bloomed into something more luscious and poppy, his aesthetic drippier and more lux. JASMYNE KEIMIG

  125. Miyavi
    Unconventional Japanese guitarist Miyavi, widely presented as an artist who represents a new wave of Asian music, will showcase his "slap style" on the North American leg of this world tour.

  126. Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo
    Women's-lib-dance-rock superstar Pat Benatar and her partner and guitarist Neil Giraldo will once again grace the Northwest with their dual presence for an evening of '80s classics.

  127. Shinedown, Badflower, Dinosaur Pile-Up, Broken Hands
    Post-Korn survivors Shinedown will throw down the gauntlet of hard rock out in Kent with openers Badflower, Dinosaur Pile-Up, and Broken Hands on their Attention Attention World Tour.

    SPORTS & RECREATION

  128. Seattle Night Ride
    Peddle a 15-mile flat route through the Burke-Gilman Trail, Fremont, Lake Union, and Queen Anne by night, punctuated by plenty of rest stop entertainment. Costumes and (safe) bike accessories highly encouraged. Be sure you have proper lights and reflectors.

    JULY 26-27

    PERFORMANCE

  129. Strictly Seattle
    If you love dance, you can't miss this festival of innovative choreography and experimental workshops. Dancers will have collaborated with special guest choreographers like Pat Graney, Dani Tirrell, Veronica Lee-Baik, Jaret Hughes, and Kate Wallich, plus Velocity staff like Mark Haim. Watch them perform the pieces they developed over several weeks as well as films from KT Niehoff's Film Track Frame by Frame dance movie program.

    JULY 26-28

    FESTIVALS

  130. BAM ARTSfair
    Shop arts from more than 300 creators and take advantage of free museum admission at this annual festival, which they claim is the largest arts and crafts fair in the Northwest. The event includes the KIDSFair, the BAMboozle children's stage, a Sound & Movement stage with international acts, and a chalkfest.

    JULY 26-AUGUST 8

    FILM

  131. The Sword of Trust
    Shelton is probably best known for 2009’s Humpday, starring Mark Duplass, or 2014’s Laggies with Kiera Knightley and Sam Rockwell—both films set in the city of Seattle. Her latest, Sword of Trust, starring Marc Maron (whom Shelton has directed on the Netflix show Glow), is her first set outside Washington State. She shot it in Birmingham, Alabama, in a mere two weeks. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

    JULY 27

    FESTIVALS

  132. Alaska Airlines Torchlight Parade
    Celebrate Seattle and welcome newcomers at this 70th annual parade, where over 100 floats, marching bands, and performers will file through downtown after the Capital One Torchlight Run.

  133. 3rd Annual Anderson School Summer Brewfest
    School's out for summer, but you can seek out some extracurricular edification at this beer festival with handcrafted ales and ciders from McMenamins as well as local guest breweries and cideries. Admission is free, and multiple bands will provide live music.

    MUSIC

  134. Chamber Music in the Park
    For this year's Chamber Music in the Park performance, members of the Seattle Chamber Music Society will play Zoltán Kodály's Duo for Violin and Cello, Op. 7 and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Trio for Violin, Viola and Cello (Divertimento) in E-flat Major, K. 563.

  135. Joyryde
    English DJ and producer John Ford, who goes by Joyryde behind the decks, is known for his blends of future house, bass, and dubstep.

  136. Lynyrd Skynyrd, Bad Company, Austin Jenckes
    Still going strong despite retaining only one original member, Lynyrd Skynyrd will bust out decades of the southern rock experience with a nine-member band on this Last of the Street Survivors Farewell Tour with support sets by Bad Company and Austin Jenckes.

  137. Norah Jones
    Husky-toned Shankar daughter Norah Jones takes on a myriad of genres, notably jazz and blues, in her last album, Day Breaks.

    JULY 27-AUGUST 24

    FILM

  138. Movies at the Mural 2019
    Stretch out on the lawn and enjoy classics like The Princess Bride and newer hits like Crazy Rich Asians and Bohemian Rhapsody, preceded by film shorts by Cornish students.

    JULY 28-AUGUST 4

    PERFORMANCE

  139. Seattle Festival of Dance Improvisation
    The Seattle Festival of Dance Improvisation, presented by Velocity Dance Center, is a diverse weeklong exploration of the art, with intensive classes, drop-in workshops, talks, jams, and performances.

    JULY 29

    MUSIC

  140. Backstreet Boys, Baylee Littrell
    The well-coiffed, nostalgia-pop-belting blood brothers of the Backstreet Boys will end their Vegas residency next spring and hop on a plane to hit cities across the globe on their DNA World Tour.

    READINGS & TALKS

  141. Jonathan Evison: Lawn Boy
    Jonathan Evison's previous novels include All About Lulu, West of Here, The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, and This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance!, all of which have earned plaudits from the Stranger's book critics (and from the New York Times and other such papers that creep about in our shadow). His latest book is about a Chicano landscape worker in Washington State who's desperately striving for a break in life.

    JULY 29-30

    MUSIC

  142. Broken Social Scene
    Easy listening is a term most commonly deployed as a pejorative, but I think Broken Social Scene make a convincing case for its use as an accolade. The loosely defined, sprawling indie-rock collective's equally loose and sprawling guitar rock could not possibly be easier on the ears, but that's not to the detriment of their songs, which range from tiny pop treasures à la "Anthem for a Seventeen Year Old Girl" to careening yet controlled studio riots to impeccable chill-out music just the right side of yacht rock. ERIC GRANDY

    JULY 30

    MUSIC

  143. Devin the Dude, G.A.S. (Grynch, Jesús Spades, Stefo)
    There’s a strain of melancholy, Southern rap that bangs bluesily, utilizing chicken-scratch guitars, deep-fried organs, and sumptuous horns to tell bleary-eyed street tales and revel in sun-baked nostalgia. Think UGK’s first few albums, or the work of production team Organized Noize. It’s a lush, humid sound, and Houston’s Devin the Dude has pretty much perfected it over a decades-long career in the game. His sleepy drawl and penchant for hilariously kush-addled observations have afforded him a cult fan base many up-and-coming rappers would kill for, and his remarkable streak of good-to-great releases (from 2002’s Just Tryin’ Ta Live to his 2013 effort, One for the Road) suggest a quality control that may surprise you, given his nonchalance and chilled demeanor on record. I’d be remiss if I didn’t single out for special mention his track “Doobie Ashtray,” the most heartbreaking ballad about friends stealing your weed ever released. KYLE FLECK

  144. Mountain Man
    If you close your eyes during a particularly harmonious Mountain Man song, you will almost certainly be transported to the riverbank of your dreams. The Appalachian-tinged folk-pop trio is comprised of Molly Erin Sarle, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig, and Sylvan Esso's Amelia Meath.

  145. The Psychedelic Furs, James, Dear Boy
    New-wave act the Psychedelic Furs exist in the same hazed, romantic dreamworld as 1980s contemporaries the Church or Echo & the Bunnymen. Also like those acts, the Furs have toured the past few years to the delight of fans not fortunate (or old) enough to have experienced their heyday. Best known for hits like “Pretty in Pink,” “Heartbreak Beat,” and “Love My Way,” the UK band is armed with exquisitely surreal lyrics, swirling, jangly guitars, soaring sax flourishes, and riffs that situate themselves firmly in your memory. Eccentric gem Robyn Hitchcock made his name with the Soft Boys’ delightfully off-kilter neo-psych in the 1970s and ’80s, helping to pave the way for the Paisley Underground movement and psych influence of early-’80s college rock. His extensive solo material and work with his band the Egyptians should also spark the interest of those intrigued by lyrics crafted with poetic whimsy paired with smart pop melodies. BRITTNIE FULLER

  146. Walk Off The Earth
    Platinum-certified, Juno Award-winning Canadian quintet Walk Off The Earth will return to the Pacific Northwest on this summer world tour, spreading their optimistic stadium pop far and wide.

    READINGS & TALKS

  147. Clarion West Presents Ann Leckie
    Hugo, Nebula, and Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author Ann Leckie is best known for Ancillary Justice, a novel set in a futuristic space empire. Leckie imagines a far-flung part of the human race as radically changed, with notions of gender vanished and AIs controlling synchronized human bodies. Seize your chance to hear from one of the most inventive sci-fi minds of the day.

    JULY 30-AUGUST 3

    MUSIC

  148. Pain in the Grass 2019
    KISW's Pain in the Grass will take over Auburn for three days of rock and punk warfare thanks to massive headliners like Slipknot, Marilyn Manson, Rob Zombie, Disturbed, and many more.

    JULY 31

    MUSIC

  149. Mayday Parade, State Champs, Mom Jeans., Just Friends
    Florida quintet and standard-bearers for the pop-rock genre Mayday Parade are back in Seattle and riding the wave of their fifth studio release Black Lines. They'll be joined by State Champs, Mom Jeans., and Just Friends.

    JULY 31-AUGUST 11

    PERFORMANCE

  150. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
    Follow Charlie Bucket through the delicious but treacherous Chocolate Factory in this musical adaptation of the Roald Dahl novel, featuring songs from the 1971 movie with Gene Wilder.