Stock up on Lactaid and head to South Lake Union for a melty sandwich-filled Saturday at the Grilled Cheese Grand Prix. Grilled Cheese Grand Prix

Our music critics have already chosen the 50 best music shows this week, but now it's our arts and culture critics' turn to recommend the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks in every genre—from Whim W’Him's Choreographic Shindig V to a reading with How to Be an Antiracist author Ibram X. Kendi, and from Bellwether 2019: Taking Root to a live broadcast of Phoebe Waller-Bridge's stage show Fleabag. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete EverOut Things To Do calendar.

Heading to Portland or Tacoma? Check out EverOut to find things to do there and in Seattle, all in one place.


Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Midnight Release of Margaret Atwood's 'The Testaments'
Find out what happened to Offred by snatching up a copy of Margaret Atwood's long-awaited sequel to The Handmaid's Tale.

Randall Munroe: How to
Randall Munroe's XKCD comic has been entertaining nerdy readers since 2005 with social commentary, weirdo romance, scientific hypotheticals, and math jokes. His previous bestsellers, What If? and Thing Explainer, present scientific and mathematical concepts in simple and fun language. Attend this reading to hear from his newest witty collection, which promises "highly impractical advice for everything from landing a plane to digging a hole."

SMooCH with Jason Isbell, Fred Armisen, Kim Gordon, Ben Gibbard & More Dec. 5th
FREE! Enjoy incredible live performances and take part giving to support patients and families at Seattle Children's Hospital
JINGLE ALL THE GAY! A Very Virtual Queerantine Christmas Edition
Seattle’s most beloved holigay tradition, streaming direct to your living room this December!

MONDAY-TUESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Bastille Rooftop Dinner Series
Dine al fresco on Bastille's rooftop, with cocktails and dinner made with ingredients sourced directly from the rooftop garden.

ALL WEEK

FOOD & DRINK

Washington Cider Week 2019
Freak out about cider at approximately a billion tastings, parties, etc. during a week so special, it lasts 11 days! See the full schedule here.

TUESDAY

FILM

Margaret Atwood: Live in Cinemas
Watch as living science-fiction legend Margaret Atwood talks to fellow author Samira Ahmed about the diverse range of works she's produced over the course of her career. This film event is happening in conjunction with the release of Atwood's much-anticipated Handmaid's Tale sequel, The Testaments.

READINGS & TALKS

Breathing Underwater: An Evening with Alexis Pauline Gumbs
Dr. Alexis Pauline Gumbs (author of M Archive and Spill: Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity) "channels the voices of her ancestors"—including whales, coral, and oceanic bacteria—to tell stories of the black diaspora in her new book Dub: Finding Ceremony. 

David Guterson: Turn Around Time
It's been five years since we've seen a new book from David Guterson, famed local author of New York Times best-selling novel Snow Falling on Cedars. But now he's breaking that silence with a new book-length narrative poem called Turn Around Time, which he says offers "a poetic take on the qualities of foot travel and of, among other things, birds, bats, fungi, flora, and fellow travelers." With poem titles like "Barthes and Barth," Guterson's poetry more readily appeals to academic types who are absolutely sure how to pronounce both of those writers' names. But this hiker-poet is at his best when he's writing about Washington's environs, so I have high hopes that these poems will be more grounded (ha-ha, kill me). Plus, press materials indicate that the long poem is sort of about a midlife crisis, which is always a fun time to check in on an author. And come on, people: He's the guy who wrote Snow Falling on Cedars. Show up and chant for the poem about bats. Be sure to come a little early so you can see Justin Gibbens's illustrations of Pacific Northwest landscapes. RICH SMITH

Gretchen McCulloch: Because internet
Gretchen McCulloch, the author of the New York Times bestselling linguistics book Because Internet, will be joined in conversation by Paul Constant and Textio CEO Kieran Snyder. Drinks and snacks will be provided.

Vox: The Weeds Podcast Live
Wonks of Seattle, rejoice! Matthew Yglesias, Ezra Klein, Dara Lind, and Jane Coaston are swinging through town to tape a live episode of The Weeds, a Vox podcast where the hosts dig into the nitty-gritty policy questions that would, in a better world, drive our politics. They cover stuff that sounds boring but that actually makes a direct impact on our lives, including tax credits, tariffs, environmental regulations, and health-care issues. Here's hoping they cover housing. RICH SMITH

TUESDAY-FRIDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Audi Culinary Series: PROOF Seattle
Last spring, chef Daniela Soto-Innes, who helms the acclaimed modern Mexican restaurants Cosme and Atla in New York, was named the World's Best Female Chef by the group behind the annual World's 50 Best Restaurants ranking. You can try her cooking for yourself at this pop-up from Audi's new PROOF culinary series.

TUESDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

Bulrusher
Stranger Genius Award and Artist Innovator Award winner Valerie Curtis-Newton will direct Eisa Davis's 2007 Pulitzer-nominated play about a multiracial, clairvoyant orphan girl (Ayo Tushinde) growing up in 1950s California. Young Bulrusher feels out of place in her very white town, where the whimsical dialect of Boontling is spoken, but things change when she meets a newcomer—a black girl from Alabama.

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

People of the Book
When a soldier returns home from war and writes a memoir about his experiences, another friend of his—a poet—feels pangs of resentment. And also suspicion. Is the memoir about the soldier’s heroics factually accurate? And there are other jealousies swirling around. The poet’s wife is someone the soldier used to have a big crush on, and may still have a crush on. Does she have feelings for him, too? Truth, infidelity, artistic jealousy, and sexual tension come together in this powerful and concise new play by Yussef El Guindi, a phenomenal writer and the winner of a Stranger Genius Award. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

VISUAL ART

Christian Marclay: The Clock
If you make the trip to Vancouver, don't miss this installation of Christian Marclay's fascinating 2010 video, a renowned work that uses clips from seven decades' worth of films to create a 24-hour clock in real time. It's been shown at the Venice Biennale and the Tate, so you're lucky to find it here. On some Fridays (including this one), the gallery will stay open for 24 hours so you can see the whole film if you wish!
Closing Sunday

Worlds Beyond Here: The Expanding Universe of APA Science Fiction
This dreamy new exhibition of Asian Pacific American science-fiction artists begins in a mock-up of a child's bedroom. Star Wars sheets cover the bed. Constellations of stars twinkle on the ceiling. From there you travel into the worlds created by local artists such as comic Stasia Burrington and sculptor June Sekiguchi, plus national comics artists such as Greg Pak. Along the way, you can play with cool VR and AR exhibits, and learn about representations of Asian Americans in film, television, and literature. It's fun for the whole damn family, people, and it serves as an excellent review of the significant contributions Asian Americans have made to the world's collective vision of the future. RICH SMITH
Closing Sunday

WEDNESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Math Night: Eugenia Cheng & Amir Alexander
Hear from two eminent authors on math, logic, and their everyday applications.  A logical approach to life isn't just limited to Mr. Spock. In fact, in this anti-intellectual, meme-filled age, it may be a great defense in the face of totalitarianism. Mathematician Eugenia Cheng will read from and discuss The Art of Logic in an Illogical World, which argues that both logical thinking and "alogic" processes—like emotion—both have their role in everyday life. UCLA professor and author Alexander will recount episodes related to European society's obsession with geometry, with applications from landscape design (including the bizarre example of Nicolas Fouquet, a 17th-century official who was arrested for creating a geometrical garden, which was a design reserved for royalty) to politics (Euclidean geometry was used to justify political structures).

Poetry in Translation: Fiestas Patrias
Washington State Poet Claudia Castro Luna presides over this wonderful series that reminds us of the linguistic diversity and wide-ranging talent of Seattle denizens. You'll hear poetry and song in the original languages and in translation into English. The Fiestas Patrias edition will also feature video poems. It's open to everyone—no one will be turned away for lack of money.

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz: An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People
In her new book An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People, activist Dunbar-Ortiz attacks the heroic myths that are still taught about the history of the US, which ignore the human rights disasters and genocidal practices inflicted on Indigenous populations. Hear her take on setting the record straight in the face of colonialism and imperialism.

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Blood Water Paint
Artemisia Gentileschi was a remarkable painter in 17th-century Italy—but today she's known almost as much for her determination to bring her rapist to justice as for her artistic genius. She's a perfect subject for female-focused Macha Theater. Blood Water Paint by Joy McCullough-Carranza recounts her career through her interactions with other women, including her models and her own daughter, as well as the trial for which she's famous.

VISUAL ART

Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen
Cecilia Vicuña's pieces gently demand a certain attention to detail, a certain kind of intentional observation and consideration. Her art is largely composed of material that's been discarded and overlooked; it contemplates displacement and climate change, embodied across several mediums. While many of her practices are deeply rooted in conceptual, land, and feminist art and the culture of the Andes, her global concern with the environment and displacement cracks open meaning to the close looker. Take Burnt Quipu (2018). Tethered to the high vaulted ceiling of the lower gallery, dozens of lengths of knotted unspun wool are arranged in a forest-like fashion. Vicuña has been making these quipus for decades, in reference to an ancient method of remembering (or record keeping) involving knotted cords, used by the Incas and other Andean cultures. Being among the wool quipus is a sort of "reading." Walking through these unstructured wool beams is a feeling unlike any other—it's just to the left of traipsing through the forest and just to the right of being lightly wrapped in a blanket.  JASMYNE KEIMIG
Closing Sunday

Ron Ho: A Jeweler's Tale
Every piece of jewelry tells a story—both about the wearer and the maker. How we adorn ourselves and make ourselves glitter is not simply a matter of function, but also of taste and history. Northwest jeweler Ron Ho’s pieces—made of jade, bone, silver, and gold—don’t ascribe to traditional ideals of balance, but instead are extremely personal and draw on his own Chinese heritage. After his death in 2017, the Hawaiian-born artist left behind a trove of writings, letters, images, paintings, and objects. This exhibition displays these items (and even offers a full reconstruction of Ho’s studio), providing a new context and perspective through which we can understand and appreciate his work. JASMYNE KEIMIG
Closing Sunday

THURSDAY

COMEDY

Charity Comedy Show: RAICES
Seattle's Bo Johnson gigs regularly around the PNW, but he's been seen more widely ("more than six million times") in the prank video "'Bo and Matthew Sneak into a Movie Theatre." See him in the flesh at this RAICES benefit show with Chris Mejia, Monica Nevi, Erin Ingle, and Manny Martin. 

The Gateway Show
It’s an experiment in stand-up: Four comics do their sets. Then these four comics get super, duper stoned. Then they perform again while occupying this much hazier headspace. Or attempt to perform again. Will the bake bring out another dimension of their comedy, or will they bomb, one by one, in forgetful spells of heaping laughter (or awkward pauses)? This sounds like an entertaining experiment, and they do it once a month. LEILANI POLK

PERFORMANCE

Nocturnal Emissions 2019
Dark-minded burlesque maven Isabella L. Price and Clinton McClung of Cinebago Events will return with their cheeky, sexy, macabre series Nocturnal Emissions, which prefaces an unusual horror classic with "phantasmagoric" burlesque performances and other fun. This week's selection is Night of the Creeps (1986), in which college nerds in the 'burbs take arms against "alien slugs, axe-slingin’ zombies, and a dude-bro named Bradster."

Rachel Lark
Enjoy an evening of political satire, raunchy comedy, and songs with sexy/sex-positive San Francisco musician Rachel Lark (whose songs have been featured on The Savage Lovecast).

READINGS & TALKS

John Englehardt: Bloomland
In John Englehardt's debut novel (which is fictional, but sadly highly recognizable), a student walks into a college library and opens fire with a semi-automatic rifle, killing 12 people. In the aftermath of the shooting, three survivors are particularly affected. 

Language as a Way of Knowing: Scott Cairns, Jennifer Maier & Mischa Willett
Three poets will read from their recent collections and discuss the power of language "as a way of knowing." 

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz: An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People
In her new book An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People, activist Dunbar-Ortiz attacks the heroic myths that are still taught about the history of the US, which ignore the human rights disasters and genocidal practices inflicted on Indigenous populations. Hear her take on setting the record straight in the face of colonialism and imperialism.

READINGS & TALKS

Thursdays with KUOW
American news consumers do not trust the media. And can you really blame them? On the one side, you have Fox News railing about HER E-MAILS, on the other side, you have Rachel Maddow shouting that THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING, and in the middle, you have sources like NPR, which most people think of as a good soporific if you can’t sleep. So, how do news stories actually get made? KUOW is going to bare all (or at least some) during a series of weekly talks and presentations by KUOW reporters. And like the press should be, it’s free. Coming up this week: Anna Boiko-Weyrauch on "The 94 Decisions That Go into a Podcast Episode." KATIE HERZOG

VISUAL ART

Capitol Hill Art Walk
Every second Thursday, rain or shine, the streets of Capitol Hill are filled with tipsy art lovers checking out galleries and special events. Check out our critics' picks for this month (like Brandon Vosika's Portraits of My Feelings) here.

Sow Queer: Artist In Residence Showcase
Town Hall’s Artist-In-Residence Hatlo, a Seattle-based queer "artistic collaborator and facilitator," will host queer performers to Town Hall for a Thursday showcase.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

COMEDY

SketchFest Seattle 2019
For the 20th time, the "world's original sketch comedy festival" will assemble comedians from around the world (and around Washington) for a week of funny skits.

READINGS & TALKS

Kathy Acker in Seattle Symposium
This symposium will be dedicated to the important experimental and feminist author and proto-Riot Grrrl Kathy Acker, who came to Seattle's Center on Contemporary Art for residencies in 1980 and 1989. She worked on two important novels while in Seattle, Blood and Guts in High School and Great Expectations. The gathering is co-organized by University of Cologne's Daniel Schulz and Fantagraphics's Larry Reid, who'll be revealing a previously unpublished manuscript by Acker from 1980.

THURSDAY & SUNDAY

FILM

NT Live: Fleabag
This stage show by Phoebe Waller-Bridge, about a mad and sexually hungry young woman trying to make sense of life, inspired the Emmy-nominated TV show of the same name. See it broadcast live.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Everything Is Illuminated
Jonathan Safran Foer’s semi-autobiographical first novel, Everything Is Illuminated, about a man (also named Jonathan Safran Foer) who travels to Ukraine to try to track down the details of his Jewish ancestry, is one of the most brilliant and celebrated novels of the last 20 years. Much of it is narrated by a translator who shows Jonathan around and gets many English words wrong, hilariously. The language of the book is key, and Book-It adaptations always emphasize the language of the original text in a way that other dramatic treatments (and the movie) don’t. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

Indy Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Temple of the Doomed Ark
Sketch writers from the Habit plus collaborators Jeff Schell and Ryan Dobosh take aim at all three Indiana Jones movies in this musical parody, smashing the second and third into a silly, song-filled version of the first. The producers say, "Indy Jones dutifully denies that the Crystal Skull ever even happened." The show is directed by Mark Siano, who had a big hit with local theater production Bohemia last year.

Is God Is
WET kicks off their season with the West Coast premiere of this sci-fi Afro-punk revenge play about two sisters en route to kill their father, presented with support from the Hansberry Project and directed by Portland's Lava Alapai. In 2016, playwright and spoken word artist Aleshea Harris won the biggest prize in American theater for the show, which debuted at the Soho Rep and extended its run twice. I can't think of anything more WET than opening the 2019/2020 season with a gory, gutsy work about two women taking down a literal patriarch with the power of pure scorn. Sounds pretty cathartic in the context of this hell world. RICH SMITH

The Legend of El Dorado
The actual legend of El Dorado is many things: a man, a myth, a kingdom pursued by the Spanish Empire. It isn't something that easily translates into an hour-and-a-half dinner cabaret. Thankfully, it turns out that Can Can's El Dorado is more concerned with booty shorts, high kicks, and stripteases than staying faithful to a narrative. Can Can describes The Legend of El Dorado as a "badass women-on-the-run story" that's "all-new, all-original, all-fishnets." Set in a "cinematic desert-scape" where a "women-led gang is kicking ass and taking names," El Dorado lets its cast and crew do what Can Can does best: wine and dine you, put on a little razzle-dazzle, and get (mostly) naked. I love it every time I go. CHASE BURNS

FRIDAY

PERFORMANCE

QiQi Cabaret
Get ready for a night of multi-genre performance art, fashion, and heavy house beats. The theme this time is "DIAMONDS...in BLACK and WHITE," so dress accordingly and marvel at the sure-to-be-amazing looks of featured performers Ms. Briq House, Atasha Manila, and LÜCHi.

READINGS & TALKS

Cascadia Magazine's Evening of Words & Ideas
Local journalists, writers, and poets published in Cascadia Magazine will gather in the flesh. On the roster: sex columnist Karin Jones on polyamory in the Pacific Northwest, climate scientist Sarah Myhre on feminism and social justice in the sciences, and local poets Susan Rich, Martha Silano, and Shin Yu Pai reading new work.

Marilynne Robinson: What Are We Doing Here?
Whether she's writing fragmented fiction (read Gilead!) or incisive essays, Marilynne Robinson's sentences hit with the weight of a proverb. Plain descriptions of everyday objects read as visions from an oracle. And even though I'm so bored with writers who continue to "search for mystery" in traditional religious texts, I can never get bored of Robinson's writing. In her new book of essays, she looks at our current political moment through Ralph Waldo Emerson's transcendentalist lens and Alexis de Tocqueville's critiques of democracy, and offers a prescription for many of our social ills. RICH SMITH

Susanna Ryan
Hear an early-morning talk by Susanna Ryan, the recently revealed cartoonist behind the charming Seattle Walk Report doodles on Instagram, now published in a book. Chase Burns: "Seattle Walk Report's 150-plus pages of twee, guidebook-style comics create an endearing collection of the small details that make Seattle a home. An abbreviated list of its findings: Churros. A scary teapot shaped like a sad dog. The Wedgwood Rock. A parking meter wearing a tie. The oldest building in Seattle (it's by the Capitol Hill Goodwill). A ground-level mailbox in Georgetown (maybe a mailbox for dogs?!). A starfish AND a crab chilling on Alki Beach. The terra-cotta on a West Roy Street apartment building. One confident duck." 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

Devour
If you like leather, kink, and cocktails, prepare to be swooned into the night by the luxe burlesque babes of Valtesse at this speakeasy-style show.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

FESTIVALS

Bellwether 2019: Taking Root
This year's festival of arts and performance spreads from the Bellevue Arts Museum to various downtown Bellevue venues, including the Meydenbauer Center and City Hall. There'll be an opening bash, pop-up art markets, and other special events, as well as the work of more than 40 artists on display. A big team of darlings of the arts and music scenes (SassyBlack, Anthony White, Michelle de la Vega, Ellen Ito, Janet Galore, Elisheba Johnson, Angelina Villalobos, and Jonathan Zwickel) have acted as curators, with the trio SuttonBeresCuller handling the general direction of the festival.

PERFORMANCE

Choreographic Shindig V
Whim W’Him kicks off their fall season the way they have for the last four years—with a sort of opposite day where dancers choose the choreographer with whom they want to work. This year, we've got Montreal-based Kyra Jean Green, who directs Trip the Light Fantastic, a group that seeks to "uncover the truth beneath the surface of human perception" through dance. Sam Houston State University assistant professor of dance Joshua Manculich and Yoshito Sakuraba, who runs Abarukas dance company, will also work with Whim W’Him's dancers to create brand-new works of contemporary dance and structured improv. RICH SMITH

SATURDAY

COMEDY

Minority Retort with Roxxy Haze
In an interview I conducted with Central Comedy Show co-host Isaac Novak, he observed that most comedy bills in Seattle still consist of about 80-percent white males. One imagines that is also the case in Portland—or perhaps it’s even greater, seeing as the Rose City’s population has a higher Caucasian percentage than the Emerald City’s. With this statistic in mind, Portland-based stand-up comedy event Minority Retort offers a platform to redress this imbalance by championing comics of color. This edition will feature Roxxy Haze, Samantha Rund, Mitch Mitchell, Bernice Ye, and Monisa Brown, plus host Julia Ramos.  DAVE SEGAL

Miscast: Back To School
Funny and spontaneous performers will be paired with actors following a script to reshape scenes from real movies that the improvisers aren't familiar with in this series directed by John Carroll. This edition is themed "Back To School," featuring scenes from movies taking place within our academic system. 

COMMUNITY

Stories in Stone: Looking for Geology on the Sidewalks of Seattle
On this geological walk, explore the literal hidden gems tucked away in Seattle's sidewalks with author David B. Williams.

FOOD & DRINK

Chinatown-ID Night Market
Traditionally, night markets are a place to stroll, shop, and nosh on tasty street-food snacks. This annual festival, which draws upwards of 25,000 people each year, takes place beneath the historic Chinatown gate in the International District, and features a slew of Asian street food alongside handmade local goods, fresh cut flowers, and more, plus entertainment that includes live bands and breakdancing groups.

Georgetown Beer Festival 2019
Georgetown, one of Seattle’s oldest neighborhoods, has built-in beer history: It’s where Rainier Beer first got its start in 1884 and was once the sixth largest brewery in the world. The inaugural edition of this new festival hosted in the historic district will celebrate the remarkably high volume of brewers in the South End, including Counterbalance Brewing, Elysian Brewing, Flying Lion Brewing, Future Primitive Brewing, Georgetown Brewing, Ghostfish Brewing, Jellyfish Brewing, Lowercase Brewing, Machine House Brewery, Perihelion Brewery, Seapine Brewing, and Tin Dog Brewing. JULIANNE BELL

Grilled Cheese Grand Prix 2019
I don’t care if you’re vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, or lactose-intolerant: Put down your diet, grab your Lactaid, and get thyself to the Grilled Cheese Grand Prix, which may be the only event this year worth the trip to South Lake Union. There you can try the Bourbon Street Bob Melt, an andouille sausage and Granny Smith combo melted between slabs of sourdough and smothered with Beecher’s and Darigold queso. Or perhaps you’re looking for something a little more Canadian. In that case, go for the Poutine Grilled Cheese, which is layered with garlic butter, slow-cooked roast beef, melted cheddar, manchego, and cheese curds, and—the coup de grace—stuffed with french fries and served with a cup of house gravy. Don’t think about tomorrow; just eat. KATIE HERZOG

Washington Artisan Cheesemakers Festival 2019
Fromage fanciers, rejoice: At this festival celebrating “the terroir of Washington” and benefiting the Washington State Cheesemakers Association, more than 20 artisan and farmstead cheesemakers from all over the state will gather to share their creamy wares. The lineup features a coterie of choice cheesemongers and covetable creameries, like Beecher’s, Twin Sisters, Mt. Townsend, and more, as well as accompaniments from artisans like preserves producer Girl Meets Dirt, plus local beer and wine. Admission includes three beverage tastes and all the cheese your dairy-loving heart desires. JULIANNE BELL

PERFORMANCE

Academy of Burlesque Faculty Showcase 2019
Enjoy the sexy stuff courtesy of the instructors and staff members of the Academy of Burlesque, including such local celebrities as Miss Indigo Blue, Waxie Moon, 2018 Reigning Queen of Burlesque INGA, and others.

READINGS & TALKS

Ibram X. Kendi: How to Be an Antiracist
Historian and American University professor Ibram X. Kendi, who wrote the National Book Award–winning history Stamped from the Beginning, is out with a new (and slightly shorter) work that helpfully draws the distinction between being "not racist" and "anti-racist." Since the phrase has been co-opted by many groups to serve many different ends, merely claiming you're "not racist" has become meaningless. Saying you're anti-racist means you're actively trying to repair the wounds of racist policy and prevent any more damage from being done. Kendi will elaborate more on this distinction in his talk, drawing on newly unearthed moments in American history to illustrate the point. Local writer Ijeoma Oluo, author of So You Want to Talk About Race, will moderate. RICH SMITH

VISUAL ART

Georgetown Art Attack
Once a month, the art scene of the tiny airport hamlet of Georgetown ATTACKS all passersby. In more literal terms, it's the day of art openings and street wonderment. If the westerly locations are too far, there's a free Art Ride! Check out our critics' picks (like the group show The Eyes Have It and Elaine Lin's I Still Love You Los Angeles, Volume 1) for this month here.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

FILM

Issaquah International Film Festival
SIFF will take movies to Issaquah for a weekend. See films like a sweet, funny Swedish drama about fourth grade, Sune vs. Sune; the Indian road-trip drama KD; the culture-clash comedy Go Back to China; the devastating Mexican fantasy/horror Tigers Are Not Afraid; and more. Best of all, screenings are free!

SUNDAY

COMEDY

Vonnegut Unexpected: Kurt Vonnegut Improvised
The improvisers of Unexpected Productions will take some instinctual liberties (paired with audience suggestions) with Slaughterhouse-Five, Breakfast of Champions, and other works by the late writer Kurt Vonnegut.

VISUAL ART

Amanda Barr and Kyle Krauskopf
Alongside Krauskopf's scrumptious watercolor record of meals he's eaten around Seattle, see ceramic sculptures by former Pottery Northwest resident artist Barr.