Local Italian American choreographer Alice Gosti will draw from her own history of immigration in Where is home : birds of passage, her first solo show at ACT Theatre. Chris Edwards
Our music critics have already chosen the 59 best music shows this week, but now it's our arts and culture critics' turn to recommend the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks in every genre—from Seattle Restaurant Week to Collide-o-Scope Halloween, and from the Ballard Brewed Winter Beer Festival to a night of comedy, cabaret, and commentary with Sandra Bernhard. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete EverOut Things To Do calendar, including all the things to do for Halloween.
Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Author Talk: The Food of Sichuan by Fuchsia Dunlop
Like spicy food, but can’t find anything hot enough no matter where you look? Maybe it’s time you tried Sichuan cuisine? Chef and author Fuchsia Dunlop (Land of Plenty: A Treasury of Authentic Sichuan Cooking) has you covered with her latest book of recipes and travel writing focused on the notoriously fiery food of that region of China. Depending on your heat tolerance, these dishes—from Bang Bang Chicken to Gong Bao Chicken to Numbing-and-Hot Dried Beef—will get you either salivating or screaming, or maybe a little of both. DAVID LEWIS

READINGS & TALKS

Anand Giridharadas: Winners Take All
Want some good arguments to lob at our Jeff Bezos–worshiping, techno-libertarian overlords who think Amazon's "Community Banana Stand" serves as a sterling example of corporate magnanimity? Then pick up a copy of former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas's new book, Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World, and buy yourself a ticket to his Town Hall lecture. In the meantime, if you see Bezos gliding around town on a Solowheel, tell him to pay his fucking taxes. RICH SMITH

Ben Percy: Suicide Woods
In this fiction collection by the author of the essay book Thrill Me, Percy tells tales of foresty horror and uncanny events. Rich Smith has written: "It's important to know how deep Benjamin Percy's voice is. It's comically deep. It takes you a few minutes to overcome its startling deepness. But once you get past his sound and into his sense, you'll realize he's a strong advocate for and excellent executioner of the literary/genre novel hybrid."

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY

VISUAL ART

Tracy Rocca: The Rockies
In her fifth solo exhibition at Winston Wächter Fine Art, Seattle artist Tracy Rocca will be showing abstract paintings based on family photos taken in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains. Her work reminds me of the moment just before an image comes together to make something fully recognizable—like gazing at a bright, beautiful landscape through frosted glass. Rocca’s blurry vision of the region is airy and atmospheric; all those blues and greens and whites draw you into the paintings, prompting you to create a meditative, dreamy space all your own. JASMYNE KEIMIG
Closing Wednesday

The Stranger Presents: A Worldwide Silent Reading Party!
Every Wednesday at 6pm PST, make yourself a snack, pour yourself a drink, and read whatever you feel like reading silently
Back by popular demand with showtunes, pop, gossip & jokes! It's Gay Misérables!
With geniuses Sara Porkalob, Justin Huertas, Nicholas Bernard, Rachel Guyer-Mafune, and Danny Kam! Encore presentation 8/7
Elliot Bay Book Co., NAAM & Tasveer Present: A Talk with Isabel Wilkerson
Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents – This book shifts fundamental perspectives on how race and related matters are understood!

MONDAY & WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY

PERFORMANCE

La Fin: Halloween Kink Cabaret
Expect a melding of dance, contortion, and aerial arts as the performers of burlesque revue Valtesse bring out their demons for a night of scary-sexy times.

MONDAY-FRIDAY

VISUAL ART

Harald Hauswald: Totally East
Hauswald's black-and-white photography testifies to the subtle spirit of rebellion, as well as the presence of repressive authority, in the German Democratic Republic. Go for an interesting glimpse into the realities of a bygone era, images that counter the official GDR narratives of mental health and happiness.
Closing Friday

MONDAY-SATURDAY

HALLOWEEN

Nightmare on Wall Street
Continuing a spooky-season tradition started last year, Belltown’s award-winning tiki bar Navy Strength will temporarily transform into a “fully immersive haunting experience,” with libations inspired by horror films like Friday the 13th, The Babadook, Midsommar, The Ring, Pet Sematary, and more. They’ll switch out their usual kitschy drinkware for vessels like pumpkins and Jason Voorhees–masked tiki mugs, and employ ingredients like “candy corn orgeat.” Frightening horror-film soundtracks will contribute to the spine-chilling milieu. JULIANNE BELL

STAR 101.5's Georgetown Morgue Haunted House
What building is better suited for a haunted house than one that's played host to funeral preparations, cremations, and the processing of animal carcasses? This annual haunted village of doom takes place in a former morgue, where brave souls are invited to explore the facility's "decrepit Catacomb" where toxic chemicals have turned dead bodies into slightly less-dead zombies. If you want VIP access, Bloodworks Northwest will be onsite on Saturday nights offering admission perks to those who volunteer to donate blood.

VISUAL ART

Terry Turrell: Spirit World
An autodidact mixed-media painter and sculptor who often mixes the two mediums, Turrell exults in highly textured techniques that often incorporate recycled materials.
Closing Saturday

MONDAY-THURSDAY & SUNDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Seattle Restaurant Week Fall 2019
Frugal gourmands everywhere rejoice over this twice-yearly event, which lets diners tuck into prix-fixe menus at more than 185 different restaurants hoping to lure new customers with singularly slashed prices. Three courses cost a mere $35, and many restaurants also offer two-course lunches for $20. It’s an excellent opportunity to feast like a high roller at an accessible price point and cross some otherwise spendy establishments off your food bucket list, including critically acclaimed restaurants like Tilth and Adana.

ALL WEEK

FILM

Guy Maddin’s Seances
The great Canadian and art house director Guy Maddin presents a performance that connects silent-era films with the latest technology (cloud computing), and the past with the future of the image. Seattle is a cloud city. Northwest Film Forum is one of Seattle’s top art houses. Seances will be a cinematic experiment that can’t go wrong because Maddin will there (for some shows), and he is really a great director, and seeing him do his thing (clouds and images) will definitely be fun. CHARLES MUDEDE

TUESDAY

FILM

Lynch: A History—A Screening with David Shields & Ijeoma Oluo
Professor, author, and filmmaker David Shields will be joined by writer and activist Ijeoma Oluo for a talk on his film Lynch: A History, all about the Seahawk's anti-racist protests and the sports media industry that targeted him.

READINGS & TALKS

Richard Stengel: The Global Battle Against Disinformation
This new book on the plague of weaponized disinformation, Information Wars: How We Lost the Global Battle Against Disinformation and What We Can Do About It, comes to us from Obama's Undersecretary of State, who's also the former editor of Time magazine. Learn how the Russian government, ISIS, and the Trump campaign used social media to spread advantageous falsehoods, and how we can avert terrible outcomes of future underhanded operations.

TUESDAY-SATURDAY

VISUAL ART

James Castle: Drawings
Born in 1899, American artist James Castle’s drawings remained relatively unknown until the 1950s. Much of his work was made with soot and saliva on found items, like flour bags or receipts. The pictures themselves depict domestic interior and exterior scenes of rural Idaho, where Castle spent most of his life. Born deaf, he never learned to read, write, or use any form of signing outside of the personal signing he did with his family, though words and symbols do appear in his work. Despite his rudimentary materials, Castle’s drawings are varied and interesting, showing a strong grasp of shading that gives his drawings depth and life. JASMYNE KEIMIG
Closing Saturday

Michael Dailey: Discoveries
Michael Dailey's absorbing, glowing abstractions play with figure/ground perception using washes of color. Former Stranger critic Jen Graves has written: "In person, Dailey's paintings glow and gleam and sparkle and transport. Their references are basic in the extreme: land, sea, and sky—mostly sky." 
Closing Saturday

Whiting Tennis: New Work
Tennis's colors cohabit uneasily, and even the symmetrical designs look unstable. He favors compositions that don't allow the gaze to rest, but jostle it from shape to shape: intestinal tangles, chaotic patchworks, smudgy mazes, indefinable objects in confrontation. But this graphic agitation also appeals to the viewer's sense of play and freedom. Far from severe, the forms he invents are variously insectoid, childlike, flailing, drooping, and prowling. JOULE ZELMAN
Closing Saturday

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Dracula
Dracula will be breathed to life yet again when playwright Steven Dietz's adaptation of the Bram Stoker tale is revived and revised specifically for ACT Theatre. In this Dracula, the focus shifts to Mina Murray Harker. Her character has always been ripe for a reckoning or a refresh, or both. She is the source of endless fascination, because she is an obvious heroine in Stoker's novel, pure of heart and mind, and yet she's just as much a casualty of Dracula's desires as her poor friend Lucy. No matter how many gender norms Stoker challenged, it was still the Victorian era. Mina could be given only so much agency. "But to simply make her a victim was super unsatisfying to all of us," director John Langs explained. "So Steven has done some reworking of the story, and she really comes to the forefront. The hunted becomes the hunter in this particular adaptation." LEILANI POLK

This Is Halloween
It’s Tim Burton’s classic The Nightmare Before Christmas; repackaged as a semi-scandalous spectacle for the masses. The audience eats chicken skewers and knocks back cocktails while they watch Jack “the Pumpkin King” Skellington sing and dance, cabaret-style, while a ghoulish orchestra pumps out the show’s signature tunes. Despite the glitzy and consumerist exterior, the crew manages to smuggle a complicated cabaret about the horror of fixed identities into the unpretentious space of the Triple Door. RICH SMITH

Zombie Cheerleaders from Hell
The Heavenly Spies are back with their annual Halloween show featuring scary hot dancers—plus "terrifying masks and pretty pasties, black cats and twerking booties, sweet transvestites and dancing cuties."

VISUAL ART

Carrie Yamaoka: recto/verso
In Carrie Yamaoka's art, you are integral to the completion of the work. Yes, you. Some of her paintings skip the traditional canvas, opting instead for polyester film and resin, giving the surface of her works a reflective and molten-like finish. The New York artist's first solo museum exhibition reflects 30 years of work. Yamaoka's work is largely process-based, meaning it focuses on the process—the act of creating the art—as its main subject. In emphasizing the work's creation, it can help us (the artist and the viewer) think about things like time, transience, movement, beginning and ending. If I go in and look at deep blue #3 tomorrow, the painting will contain a different version than the Jasmyne who gazed at it for the first time. Yamaoka's paintings remind us viewers that our relationship to art mirrors our relationship to ourselves—always changing, never static, not quite capturable, but always there. JASMYNE KEIMIG
Closing Sunday

WEDNESDAY

COMEDY

Wednesday Night Comedy with Gabe Rutledge
In a recent interview, Central Comedy Show's Henry Stoddard and Isaac Novak singled out Gabriel Rutledge as perhaps the Seattle area's funniest comic—a view reinforced by Rutledge winning the Seattle International Comedy Competition and his frequent major TV appearances. Working in the familiar territory of family life and its countless frustrations and sorrows, Rutledge finds many quirky angles from which to squeeze distinctive humor out of everyday situations. His bit about parents desperately trying to snatch a couple of spare minutes to have sex might ring all too true for many. Happiness Isn't Funny is the title of his book and the guiding principle behind his unerring humor. DAVE SEGAL

FILM

1959: The Greatest Year in Film History Semester 2
Robert Horton is continuing his class series asserting that 1959 was the best year in film history ever. It saw "a high point of Hollywood studio filmmaking, the rise of new independent cinema, the great flowering of international movies, and the beginning of the French New Wave." Delve into the highlights of this landmark year with this week's pick, The Black Pit of Dr. M.

HALLOWEEN

Dark Market at Rose Temple
'Tis the season to shop for dark occult wares. This market promises an eclectic mix of stuff by local artists, from Foggy Moon Pottery to Trash Witch Coven.

Glory Hole: Haunted House
This lineup of local drag performers—One, Miss Texas 1988 (who Jasmyne Keimig attests "quite literally throws herself into her performance, using her best tool—her body—to express and heighten emotion"), Bitch Hazel, Angel Baby Kill Kill Kill, and Old Witch—should be enough to get you to this fearsome drag/art show.

READINGS & TALKS

Philip Deloria: Becoming Mary Sully
This professor of Native American and Indigenous history at Harvard University, author of Indians in Unexpected Places and Playing Indian, will speak about the oeuvre of Dakota Sioux artist Mary Sully. Completely under the radar of white art critics and even Native art historians, Sully worked from the '20s to the '40s, marrying modern abstraction with "indigenous women’s expressive traditions of the northern Plains." Deloria will argue for Sully's place in the canon.

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY

VISUAL ART

Mapping the Grid
SAM Gallery welcomes artists who employ or adapt images of grids, maps, and geometry—Harold Hollingsworth, Ryan Molenkamp, Jo Moniz, Nina Tichava, and more.
Closing Thursday

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Beware the Terror of Gaylord Manor
The world-famous Seattle-based drag queen BenDeLaCreme has written and performed three acclaimed solo shows, but Beware the Terror of Gaylord Manor, which premiered in 2017, was the artist's first foray into writing, directing, and starring in an original play of her own. It's a spooky, campy twist on the horror-flick genre, featuring ghosts, dancers, music, and special effects. The chemistry between BenDeLaCreme and Scott Shoemaker alone is worth the price of admission. CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

The Great Moment
Playwright Anna Ziegler earned a lot of attention in 2015 for Photograph 51, a well-received bio-drama about Rosalind Franklin, the woman who discovered DNA. Nicole Kidman played the starring role, everybody loved it, and Ziegler was praised for her "fair-minded and philosophical" (New York Times) approach to character building. Ziegler will likely bring that same talent for creating multidimensional characters to The Great Moment, which will have its world premiere at the Seattle Rep. According to press materials, the story follows a woman named Sarah, who is watching her grandfather slowly die while she raises her son. Alexandra Tavares plays the lead in this, and I've loved everything I've ever seen her in. RICH SMITH

The Tempest
Accomplished director Annie Lareau (Cornish College of the Arts' Much Ado About Nothing, many Seattle Public Theater productions), will tackle Shakespeare's fantastical final work about an island wizard, his hot daughter, his nonhuman slaves, and his princely prisoner. This staging will take place in an Edwardian castle, "one of the last periods before media started to infiltrate people's lives."

THURSDAY (HALLOWEEN)

FILM

Booktoberfest Halloween Horror Movie Marathon
The library will present four classics that you can watch for free: A Bucket of Blood, Little Shop of Horrors, Carnival of Souls, and Night of the Living Dead (the original).

The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari
Removed as they are from the modern movie-going experience, silent movies possess a special kind of hypnotic otherworldliness—and few are stranger than Robert Wiene's 1919 Expressionist masterwork The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, a tale of a malevolent fairground "doctor" and the unfortunate sleepwalker who murders at his command. Don't miss your chance to see this film with a live score by award-winning Seattle keyboardist Wayne Horvitz and his ensemble.

Collide-o-Scope Halloween
Spend the holiday experiencing a delightfully freaky, swirly montage of music and mayhem made of found-footage phantasmagoria from the archives of the cheeky Collide-O-Scope duo Shane Wahlund and Michael Anderson. Come in costume—they may bestow one of their much-coveted prizes upon you! Plus, everyone has a chance to win a kitschy prize in the drawings. This year will feature a special musical performance by Adé A Cônnére, a VIP of Seattle's queer scene.

FOOD & DRINK

Andrew Rea: Book Tour With Babish
Paired with his light humor, soothing NPR vocal quality, and recipes re-created from TV shows, movies, and video games (ranging from Harry Potter's butterbeer and chocolate frogs to dire wolf bread from Game of Thrones to the huevos rancheros in Breaking Bad), YouTube cooking star Andrew Rea has generated quite the following—more than five million YouTube subscribers and counting. His appearance at Town Hall on October 31, as part of his cookbook tour for Binging with Babish: 100 Recipes Recreated from Your Favorite Movies and TV Shows, will mark his first official pilgrimage here. No food will actually be served, but he'll be presenting a slideshow of behind-the-scenes pics and other apparently goofy and tantalizing photos of dishes from the show. It's definitely worth attending, even for people who have no interest in learning how to make Homer Simpson's waffle-iron-destroying Patented Space Age Out-of-This-World Moon Waffles, or Chef's Chocolate Salty Balls, or the Legend of Zelda's Monster Cake, or even Frasier Crane's signature pomegranate and honey sauce. You'll get the chance to find out how somebody who, without any professional training in either cooking or video production, managed to quit their day job and make a living from their love of eating food and watching TV. DAVID LEWIS

PERFORMANCE

The Atomic Bombshells... PUT A SPELL ON YOU!
The boisterous Atomic Bombshells troupe has been instrumental in Seattle's burlesque revival, so if you're craving a joyous, carnal, and glitzy spectacle for Halloween, look no further. They're promising "the campiest vamps in the land" along with surprise guest stars. Stay on afterward for Century Ballroom's Annual Halloween Disco Dance.

Cucci's Spooky Weed
Cucci Binaca, a mischievous ringleader in Seattle’s drag scene, is potty-mouthed, perpetually stoned, and the conservative right’s worst nightmare, which makes her a favorite here at The Stranger. In Cucci’s Spooky Weed, she invites drag performers to create numbers that are both spooky and stoned, and it’s a riot (sometimes literally). Get hella high before you go, and be prepared for performers who are more likely to spend their number bleeding onto a canvas than lip-synching to Britney Spears.

Find even more All Hallows' Eve events on our complete Halloween calendar

THURSDAY-FRIDAY

COMEDY

Stabbin' Cabin
Do you enjoy horror, but find it too...predictable? If you find yourself accurately predicting every jump scare, try this energetic, highly physical send-up of the genre, which will be totally improvised by talented Jet City and community performers. Best of all, you (the audience) get to choose the killer! Watch as teen screamers straight out of '80s summer-camp slasher movies face a fearsome threat.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Sumo + Sushi
Hawaiian-born Japanese Samoan Sumo wrestling legend Konishiki will explain the rules of the game to you before taking on fellow athletes in a few rounds. The best part: You get to eat delicious sushi all the while.

PERFORMANCE

Simone Pin Productions Presents: Dollhouse
The burlesque talents of women of color will be front and center at Simone Pin company's second show at the Northwest Film Forum, featuring the Dollhouse Coven (TAQUEET$!, Lindy Lou, Jennifer Meilani, Shay Simone, Annya Pin), Mama (Adra Boo), and their creepy-sexy secrets.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

The Thanksgiving Play
In this holiday comedy, Lakota playwright Larissa FastHorse takes aim at a group of white teaching artists who end up reasserting colonial ideology in their attempt to rid their teaching practice of that very same ideology. According to Jesse Green's review in the New York Times, the more cringe-inducing skits in the show are based on actual school lesson plans lifted from social-media posts: "They include potted history and offensive ditties and, in one case, a suggestion to split the pupils into Pilgrims and Indians 'so the Indians can practice sharing.'" Sounds like it'll be another fine entry into the growing canon of plays about white people fucking up something they're trying to fix. I'm unfamiliar with the actors in the show, but I have no doubt they'll flourish in the highly capable hands of director Kelly Kitchens. RICH SMITH

Where is home : birds of passage
You know what's really scary? Concentration camps for asylum seekers at the border, constant ICE raids, border patrol separating children from their parents and not having the administrative infrastructure to unite them, and the state generally doing everything it can to dehumanize people who want to immigrate to this country. In her brand-new—and first-ever (!)—solo show, Where is home : birds of passage, local Italian American choreographer Alice Gosti aims to push back against the xenophobic narratives that drive these anti-immigrant policies. She'll draw from her own history with immigration as well as the larger history of Italian immigration to the United States in a spectacle that will run about three hours. As always with Gosti's work, you'll get to decide how much attention you want to devote to this performance. And the act of making that decision, of course, is part of the performance. RICH SMITH

FRIDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Jenny Odell: Reclaiming Our Attention in an Age of Distraction
During public talks, multidisciplinary artist Jenny Odell stresses that How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy isn't a self-help book designed to make you put down your phone so you can be more productive at work later on. It's not a book about becoming a monk who stares at a silver bowl in a cave all day, either. But she does look at how social media and tech have changed our notion of "productivity" and then offers a pretty compelling way out of the crass and alienating life such a notion engenders. Along the way, she presents tons of fascinating found objects, academic research, amateur birding, journalism, and personal stories that make the book feel like a textual cabinet of curiosities. RICH SMITH

Meghan Daum: The Problem with Everything
Daum's latest book, The Problem with Everything, is, in part, about watching the culture change around her, something she calls "a moment of profound cognitive dissonance." Values that were once solidly the purview of the left—the importance of transgressive art and comedy, the need for due process, an almost pathological defense of free speech—have been abandoned by the very people who once defended them and co-opted by the political right. It's a shift that Daum is concerned about, to put it lightly. "There is no room for nuance right now. Instead, we see a lot of purity-policing and authoritarianism," Daum says. "The similarities between the Christian right and the woke left are pretty striking. Except the Christian right at least has the concept of redemption. The left doesn't have that." The Problem with Everything is about herself, but it's also about culture, politics, society, how we live now, and the ever stretching divide between older generations and younger ones. KATIE HERZOG
Meghan Daum will appear in conversation with Katie Herzog

Nisi Shawl: Talk Like a Man
Local sci-fi icon Nisi Shawl (best-known for the brilliant Everfair) will read from their new collection of short stories, featuring virtual reality high schools, magical mirrors, and sex rites.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

COMEDY

Billy Wayne Davis
Straight outta Crossville, Tennessee, Billy Wayne Davis deploys his experience in that small town and other places in the South to provoke laughter among city slickers. Tall tales of bad luck and legal transgressions somehow seem inherently funnier when related in a Southern drawl, and Davis excels at those. A single parent, he probably has the most hilarious bit about dropping an infant on its head. He also has some acerbically witty things to say about Seattle. Davis has opened for country-music renegade Sturgill Simpson and released an album on Jack White’s Third Man label, so you can be sure he can rock a room such as Club Comedy. DAVE SEGAL

VISUAL ART

Ken Barnes: Recent Stone Sculptures
Former rock climber and current sculptor Ken Barnes shapes elegant, simple objects in beautiful stone. He's known for reflecting natural forms in works like Fluke, Corona, and Corpuscles. He writes: "Stone is among the oldest of sculptural materials and might seem irrelevant in a petrochemical world, but people react to stone from an ancient place within. It brings them back to simpler times, with forms and textures not pulled from a machine mold, and they are drawn to touch and caress the surfaces."
Closing Saturday

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

VISUAL ART

Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas: Carpe Fin
Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas has been producing "Haida manga," a new style marrying Haida formline with Japanese manga storytelling and other visual influences, for nearly two decades. SAM has commissioned a major new work from Yahgulanaas: a six-by-19-foot watercolor mural based on a Haida story about a hunter "taken underwater to the realm of a powerful spirit." The mural—accompanied by a 19th-century headdress made by Yahgulanaas's relative Albert Edward Edensaw, a naaxin robe and pattern board, and the artist's sketches—comments on environmental issues and humanity's relationship with nature.
Opening Friday

SATURDAY

COMEDY

Ryan Hamilton
Idahoan Ryan Hamilton, his enormous smile, and his gentle burring voice are coming to charm Seattle. Check out why Rolling Stone named this Great American Comedy Festival winner one of five comics to watch. For a preview, check out his special Happy Face on Netflix.

FOOD & DRINK

Ballard Brewed Winter Beer Festival
Look, any time is a good time to drink local craft beer, and now, as temperatures are dropping and the cloud cover is picking up to a deep and fluffy gray, there aren’t a whole lot of events where you can try a bunch of seasonal beers by different breweries all in one festive place. Enter the Ballard Brewed Winter Beer Festival, in which Ballard-area breweries (Bad Jimmy’s, Hale's Ales Brewery, Lagunitas Brewing Company, Lucky Envelope Brewing, Maritime Pacific Brewing Company, NW Peaks Brewery, Obec Brewing, Peddler Brewing, Populuxe Brewing, Reuben’s Brews, and Stoup Brewing) offer tastes of two winter beers each—and one of those will be released for the first time ever at the festival. Proceeds benefit Bellwether Housing, touted as Seattle’s largest private, nonprofit affordable-housing provider. LEILANI POLK

Cherry Bombe Jubilee Seattle
Women who work in the food industry (and anyone interested in finding out more about how it works behind the scenes) are invited to the Seattle edition of Cherry Bombe Jubilee. Originally launched by Cherry Bombe magazine back in 2014, the conference gathers women in the industry—bakers, restaurateurs, chefs, food photographers, writers, food producers, et al.—for a day of “conversation, connections, and, of course, great food and drink.” Local guests will include Seattle food giants Renee Erickson, Makini Howell, and Rachel Yang, and a renowned out-of-towner in Angie Mar (NYC’s the Beatrice Inn, author of Butcher and Beast), plus a keynote conversation that finds Seattle area food stylist, blogger, and cookbook author Aran Goyoaga interviewing New York Times and Bon Appétit columnist Alison Roman, who has a new book out (Nothing Fancy: Unfussy Food for Having People Over). DAVID LEWIS

Oyster New Year
The apotheosis of the Pacific Northwest’s unofficial regional pastime, slurping oysters, is the eco-friendly Oyster New Year at Elliott’s Oyster House. The all-out briny bash features more than 30 varieties of bivalves shucked to order at a 150-foot oyster bar, a fresh seafood buffet, and local microbrews and wine from more than 60 wineries. Be a little superficial and cast your vote for the People’s Choice “Most Beautiful Oyster,” and don’t miss the oyster luge, in which a shucked oyster glides down a frozen slide in an ice sculpture, into your mouth, and down your gullet. JULIANNE BELL

Sagra di Radicchio
Cheers for chicories! Inspired by the Italian tradition of the sagra (a festival usually celebrating local food), this weeklong event dedicated to the refreshingly bitter radicchio kicks off with a tasting event with experts, farmers, and chefs. 

PERFORMANCE

Sandra Bernhard's 'Quick Sand': Comedy, Cabaret, and Commentary
In a wide-ranging interview conducted the same day that Republican congressional douchebags stormed the underground intelligence chamber in the US Capitol with their cell phones out (“They’re utter morons,” she said, “It’s just embarrassing!”), Sandra Bernhard and I talked about Donald Trump (a “national disaster”), Mark Zuckerberg (“he’s a nightmare”), Nancy Pelosi (“masterful”), and which three powerful women throughout history Bernhard would invite to a dinner party. As for her show, it will be her usual iconoclastic mix of comedy and music. Bernhard: "Tell them it’s okay it’s a Jewish venue. Tell them not to be nervous about that." CHRISTOPHER FRIZZELLE

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

VISUAL ART

Beyond Bollywood: Indian Americans Shape the Nation
The long and varied history of Indian Americans stretches back to the 19th century, and this exhibition explores their contributions to American life from the age of railroads to the Civil Rights movement.
Opening Saturday

SUNDAY

COMEDY

Horror Unexpected
Taking content cues from the masters of horror and real-time cues from you, the audience, this silly night of comedy is brought to you by the Unexpected Productions improv team.

FOOD & DRINK

Normandy Dinner
The Normans of France experience the same soul-sucking fall weather as Seattleites; they remedy the situation with lots of cream, apples, meat, and calvados. This ninth annual tradition—which used to take place at the Boat Street Café—promises a night of warming-up in the Norman style: An oyster and cider reception, followed by a four-course meal prepared by chefs Renee Erickson and Breckin VanRaalte.