Not  a live look at Ballard now, yesterday, or ever
Not a live look at Ballard now, yesterday, or ever. koto_feja/ Getty Images

Brock Long is the name of the FEMA administrator we get, not the name of the porn star we deserve: FEMA administrator Brock Long went on NBC’s Meet the Press to discuss Hurricane Florence, and also to defend FEMA’s response—sorry—their utter failure of a response to the devastation in Puerto Rico, caused by Hurricane Maria. Brock said their concerns were figuring out how to stop the “direct deaths” caused by “the wind, the water, and the waves,” distinguishing them from what he deemed to be indirect deaths such as… “spousal abuse.” “Spousal abuse goes through the roof,” he says, and “you can’t blame spousal abuse after a disaster on anybody.”


At the end of the day, his interview proves either his utter incompetence or his utter negligence. If we, for argument's sake, pretend everything this guy says is true, including the part about how they have many studies to show spousal abuse goes through the roof after hurricanes, all it would serve to do is show that they are unabashedly aware of dire consequences of such disasters, and knowingly don’t do jack shit to mitigate or manage them. When pressed for whether or not he believed studies (real studies), like the one George Washington University did on excess mortality from Hurricane Maria, were conducted just to make Trump look bad, his actual response was, “I don’t know why the studies were done.” Regardless of how Brock Long spins and dresses his own crap, it’s still just crap.

Could creepy Kavanaugh’s (alleged) creeping past come back to haunt him?: Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was accused of sexual assault by a woman he knew in high school. Though she was anonymous at first, she was outed as Christine Blasey Ford. In an interview with the Washington Post, Arizona senator Jeff Flake said, “I’ve made it clear that I’m not comfortable moving ahead with the vote on Thursday if we have not heard [Ford’s] side of the story or explored this further.” Tennessee senator Bob Corker, also sided with Senator Flake in urging the judiciary committee to hold off on the vote. If this all seems familiar, it is because it is, and sadly, history does not bode well on is this issue. Not only was Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas confirmed after Anita Hill, his accuser, was subjected to an insanely brutal, public hearing, he was confirmed with a Democrat-controlled Senate. Responding to a request for comment from Politico, Anita Hill said, "I have seen firsthand what happens when such a process is weaponized against an accuser, and no one should have to endure that again."

Funnel clouds are neither scary tornadoes nor tasty funnel cakes: Okay, a man spotted a funnel cloud in Ballard. Somehow this made the front page on KING 5’s website. A close friend even shared this news with me. Look, Ballard funnel cloud, I understand you are rare and all, but please, call me when you’re a real tornado. Alas, what do I know—if this is what makes people happy, then that makes me happy, I guess.

For Moon and Kim, it’s never too soon: South Korean president Moon Jae-in will meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un on Tuesday to discuss deescalating military tensions between the two countries. Something about the pictures of Kim and other world leaders shaking hands and smiling together is just plain bananas. Totally, totally bananas. Could it be because Kim is a dictator who leads an oppressive regime in which “his people” live in destitute poverty? Or could it be because his hair rivals only Donald J. Trump in terms of cringe-worthiness? Probably the combination of both.

There’s something off about the hashtag the National Weather Service uses in this Hurricane Florence tweet—I just can’t put my finger on it:


It’s a new week—there's a new majestic animal to discuss killing: Oregon had its first ever fatal cougar attack recently, and anytime something like that happens, there’s a group of people chomping at the bit to go hunt and kill the perpetrating species. In a world of extremes, it is hard to know what to think. What we do know, is that no matter what the smart thing to do actually is, there will always be a group of people waiting for a chance to rationalize killing big game, and there will always be a group of people who will never accept that as an option—and these contrasting voices will ultimately be the loudest voices. It is interesting to point out that in Oregon, during 2018, there have been 317 automobile fatalities, and hardly anyone is calling for an open car-hunting season—but one-ever cougar death, and all of the intellectual justifications for hunting them start popping out of the woodwork.

What would be the cost, theoretically of course, of doing one moral thing: Last week, Nathalie Graham mentioned in her Slog PM post how Jeff Bezos is finally doing some philanthropic work. Scott Greenstone, reporting for the Seattle Times, decided to try to figure out if the $2.1 billion Jeff Bezos promised, would theoretically be enough to cover the cost of housing Seattle's homeless population. Turns out we have no idea the true scope of the problem, and so even the most educated guess could turn out to be woefully low. That being said, the best report currently available projects the cost at $400 million a year.

Enough mourning summer, fall in Seattle is perfect:


Let this daily dose of Gouda comfort you through your inevitably painful Monday:

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Tonight's best Seattle entertainment options include: The Trove Noodle: Hawaiian Luau Pop-Up, a show with Norwegian folk music duo Wardruna, and John Kerry's reading of his memoir Every Day Is Extra.