The 53 Best Things To Do in Seattle This Week: Sept 25-Oct 1, 2017

Dont miss the extremely popular Incredible Feast dinner on Sunday, when more than 15 of the citys best and most innovative chefs will work with local farmers to create a 20+ course meal.
Don't miss the extremely popular Incredible Feast dinner on Sunday, when more than 15 of the city's best and most innovative chefs will work with local farmers to create a 20+ course meal. Courtesy of Neighborhood Farmers Markets

Our music critics have already chosen the 27 best concerts this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn. Here are their picks for the best events in every genre—from Local Sightings to GeekGirlCon, and from the Great Pumpkin Beer Festival to Jinkx Monsoon & Bob the Drag Queen in Peaches Christ's Hocum Pokem. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

recommendedGet all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play. recommended

MONDAY
PERFORMANCE
Holcombe Waller: Notes from the Riverkeepers
Holcombe Waller’s Notes from the Riverkeepers , which explores the 2016 Mosier, Oregon, train derailment, is a folk, blues and soul-inspired "musical response" to Waller’s three-month artist residency with the Columbia Riverkeeper in 2016. Featuring Dana J. on drums, Justin Miller on bass, and Joshua Thomas on keyboards and guitars.

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EnviroPanicHorrors

Inslee Quake Advisers: Invest in Pamphlets, Not Upgrades

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Getty Images

As recent earthquakes have rocked parts of Mexico and New Zealand, Pacific Northwesterners may be wondering if we're next—and what our government is doing to protect us from the massive earthquake that will someday break along the Cascadia fault line off the coast of Washington state.

Kathryn Schulz, The New Yorker staff writer who scared the bejesus out of Northwesterners in her Pulitzer-winning article, "The Really Big One," described the coming quake:

When the next very big earthquake hits, the northwest edge of the continent, from California to Canada and the continental shelf to the Cascades, will drop by as much as six feet and rebound thirty to a hundred feet to the west—losing, within minutes, all the elevation and compression it has gained over centuries. Some of that shift will take place beneath the ocean, displacing a colossal quantity of seawater.... The water will surge upward into a huge hill, then promptly collapse. One side will rush west, toward Japan. The other side will rush east, in a seven-hundred-mile liquid wall that will reach the Northwest coast, on average, fifteen minutes after the earthquake begins. By the time the shaking has ceased and the tsunami has receded, the region will be unrecognizable. Kenneth Murphy, who directs FEMAs Region X, the division responsible for Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Alaska, says, “Our operating assumption is that everything west of Interstate 5 will be toast.”

It will be, Schulz writes,"the worst natural disaster in the history of the continent." So how are Washington leaders preparing? According to a forthcoming report from Gov. Jay Inslee's Resilient Washington Subcabinet, a group convened this year to help the state prepare for natural disasters, the state isn't doing much of anything.

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Sponsored

Save 20% on tickets to Pacific Northwest Ballet’s Jewels – all dressed up in glorious new tutus, tiaras & scenery at McCaw Hall.

Emeralds, Rubies and Diamonds grace the stage in Jewels, a mid-century homage to ballet in France, USA, and Russia with music by Faure, Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky. Created as a showcase for Balanchine’s favorite ballerinas, three distinct ballet styles are performed to perfection by PNB’s star dancers. Dressed up in new costumes and scenery by Jerome Kaplan of Don Quixote and Giselle fame. The Stranger readers save 20% on tickets.

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The 27 Best Concerts in Seattle This Week: Sept 25-Oct 1, 2017

Celebrate the return of Gorillaz (after nearly seven years off) at their KeyArena show on Saturday.
Celebrate the return of Gorillaz (after nearly seven years off) at their KeyArena show on Saturday.

This week, our music critics recommend everything from the British musician who's more relevant now than ever (Billy Bragg), to the rock band who will make future humans nostalgic for 2017 (Versing), to the young and promising country singer who's changing the redneck image (Sturgill Simpson). Follow the 27 links below for ticket links and music clips, and find even more options on our music calendar.

recommendedGet all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play. recommended

MONDAY
Television
Television’s last Seattle date at the Moore in 2015 exceeded high expectations. Yes, guitarist Richard Lloyd was gone, but Jimmy Rip capably replaced him, and the New York rock legends’ Marquee Moon and Adventure songs sounded just as vital as when they were minted during the Carter administration. (The tunes from their self-titled 1992 comeback LP didn’t disappoint, either.) Television continue to rivet because they do something few rock groups can manage: They excel at both indelible hooks and spontaneous instrumental interplay (aka spectacular guitar heroics). Plus, frontman Tom Verlaine—to quote Marc Bolan—is a natural-born poet and he’s just outta sight. DAVE SEGAL

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NewsCityMoney

The Big Takeaways from Mayor Tim Burgess's 2018 Budget Proposal

Tim Burgess taking the oath of office after Mayor Ed Murray resigned. Burgess will be in office for about two months.
Tim Burgess taking the oath of office after Mayor Ed Murray resigned. Burgess will be in office for about two months. City of Seattle

Mayor-for-a-minute Tim Burgess presented his proposed 2018 budget to the Seattle City Council today, promising $600,000 in new funding for sexual abuse and domestic violence programs.

Former mayor Ed Murray's staff had largely finished the budget before Murray resigned on September 13 in the wake of allegations that he abused five men when they were teenagers. When Burgess took the oath of office to replace Murray, he was asked about calls from advocates for the city to increase funding for survivors of sexual violence. At the time, Burgess said he would defer to the council.

Burgess said today, "A person who has the courage to report a domestic assault should not have to fear that the law is going to leave them in limbo when it comes to getting the gun out of their abuser’s hands. Nor should a survivor of sexual assault...have to worry that our mayor’s office, or any part of our city government, is not sufficiently invested in the task of helping those who come forward to report such abuse."

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Sponsored

See THE BOOK OF MORMON at The Paramount Theatre

The New York Times calls it "the best musical of this century." This outrageous musical comedy follows the misadventures of a mismatched pair of missionaries, sent halfway across the world to spread the Good Word. Now with standing room only productions in London, on Broadway, and across North America, THE BOOK OF MORMON has truly become an international sensation. Contains explicit language.

Get Tickets HERE!


The Stunning, Symmetrical Spectacle of Jewels

The whole thing looks like this all the time and its fucking amazing.
The whole thing looks like this all the time and it's fucking amazing. Angela Sterling

The entire audience gasped when the curtain rose on Pacific Northwest Ballet's production of George Balanchine's Jewels, which is often lauded as the world's first plotless full-length ballet, a complete choreographic embrace of high modernist ideals, a kaleidoscopic stunner, a "pure" ballet unlike any other kind of ballet the people of 1967 had seen before.

It's not uncommon to hear such a gasp for a set reveal, but the one I heard on opening night was more audible than most, sustained, and followed by lots of exasperated murmuring. A woman sitting behind me loudly and to no one in particular announced her need for an oxygen tank. People were freaking out and none of the dancers had even moved yet.

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The Worst Bus Stop in America Is in Seattle (And Other Nerdy Bus News)

Poor Bus Stop No. 45990 :-(
Poor Bus Stop No. 45990 :-( GOOGLE MAPS IMAGE

How many times has this happened to you? You’re heading to the bus so you glance at your app. The bus is running at least 20 minutes late. Well, shit, you think, but oh well, so you take your sweet time, chatting with your barista crush and petting random doggos on the street until you check the app again. What the %$%#! Now the bus is only two minutes away, dammit!

Next thing you know, you’re running, hot coffee spilling out onto your hands, cursing the Gods of Public Transportation (they are vengeful, angry Gods). Well, bus riders rejoice: Metro Bus has just unveiled a shiny, newly updated transit data-collecting system to make sure that never happens again.

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You Don't Need to Watch the New Lady Gaga Doc but You Do Need to Watch This Scene


Gaga: Five Foot Two, which came out last Friday on Netflix, will be a snoozefest for non-Gaga fans. But like the 1991 Madonna documentary it mimics, certain scenes are instant Camp classics—deliberate Camp, but Camp nevertheless. For those who love this type of shit (gays), this scene should not be missed:

Lady Gaga, underscored by classical music, stomps into a Walmart to buy her new album, Joanne. She wears her carefully created Joanne uniform—tight denim, white cut-off tee, pink cowboy hat, visible bra. The store is a maze of overlit aisles and plastic containers. The customer service isn't helpful. Despite her camera crew, entourage, and face advertised around the store, no one recognizes her. (Sontag: "Pure Camp is always naive. Camp which knows itself to be Camp ('camping') is usually less satisfying.") We're made to believe that she's simply Stefani Germanotta, and shopping at a Walmart sucks for her, too.

Last year (when this was filmed) was not a good year for CDs. Spin reported that listeners streamed 208.9 billion songs in 2016 (a 58.7 percent increase from the year before). CD sales, unsurprisingly, continue to decline—only 40 million units were moved in the first six months of 2016 (a decline of 11.6 percent compared to the same period in 2015). And when people do decide to buy CDs, where do they get them? Not Walmart.

From Billboard:

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NewsTech

This Web Service Banned The Daily Stormer. Why Won't It Drop Another Neo-Nazi Recruitment Forum?

Protesters demonstrating against the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville are treated after a rally attendee used his car to barrel through a crowd. Many people were injured and one woman, Heather Heyer, was killed. Hate group experts say white nationalists are recruited and emboldened by websites like Iron March.
Protesters demonstrating against the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville are treated after a rally attendee used his car to barrel through a crowd, killing one woman. Hate group experts say white nationalists are recruited and emboldened by websites like IronMarch.org. GETTY / CHIP SOMODEVILLA

In August, GoDaddy, Google, and Cloudflare cut their ties to The Daily Stormer, each company saying the neo-Nazi website violated their terms of service agreements. The tech giants made their decisions only after Heather Heyer was killed in a vehicular attack during protests against the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, the Stranger's Eli Sanders noted.

The companies' announcements inspired thinkpieces about free speech in the digital age, including one from Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince.

In a blog post, Prince called the neo-Nazi site "vile" and "hateful." However, the "tipping point" for his decision to ban The Daily Stormer, he wrote, "was that the team behind Daily Stormer made the claim that we were secretly supporters of their ideology."

Given Prince's criticisms, it's unclear why Cloudflare continues serving IronMarch.org, a neo-Nazi recruitment forum.

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Spun Out: 5 Essential Cuts Selected by Local DJ Ramiro

Ramiro: Always striving for those moments when the synergistic connection between the DJ and the dancers takes on a life of its own.
Ramiro: Always striving for those moments when "the synergistic connection between the DJ and the dancers takes on a life of its own." Brit Hansen

RAMIRO (RAMIRO GUTIERREZ; Uniting Souls)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Andhim, "Huso" (Superfriends)

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Does Star Trek: Discovery Justify Signing Up for CBS All Access?

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So far there's been as much discussion about Star Trek: Discovery's distribution model as there has been about Star Trek: Discovery.

In order to watch anything beyond last night's series premiere, Americans have to subscribe to CBS All Access, the network's attempt to create a streaming service that stands alongside services like Netflix, Hulu, HBO Now, ad infinitum. (In other countries, Netflix subscribers will find Discovery already included in their subscription, since Netflix provided a big chunk of Discovery's budget.) Asking people to pony up for CBS All Access is a tall order, given that other streaming services have of stuff that people actually want to watch, while CBS All Access has Discovery and... uh, I guess a lot of episodes of The Big Bang Theory? In case you find the skull-splitting experience of existing in 2017 not painful enough and want to make it even worse?

On one hand, it's a bit unfair that Discovery is inextricably linked to All Access. On the other, it makes perfect sense to talk about them together: I can't think of another time when a new TV show has launched and, after less than an hour, asked viewers to pay for a streaming service they probably don't want in order to continue. Last night's first hour of Discovery not only had to not only kick off a whole new Star Trek series, it also had to convince viewers to buy into CBS All Access.

Did it accomplish the former? Uh, kind of! Mostly!
Did it accomplish the latter? Not a chance.

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Why the Overrepresentation of Black Americans in Professional Sports Is Not a Good Thing

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Frederick Breedon/Getty Images

It was not hard for Trump's attack on football and basketball athletes to be racial. Blacks are vastly overrepresented in these sports. But why? The tech industry is only 7 percent black, the NFL is 65 percent black, and the NBA is 75 percent black. The answers are found in social factors and processes.

The decline of black Americans in baseball, for example, has little to do with how it's a "white man's sport." In the 1970s, nearly 20 percent of professional baseball players were black, and its biggest stars, such as Hank Aaron and Reggie Jackson, were black Americans. Then came the decline of black neighborhoods (or what mid-century black sociologists called the Black Metropolis), which, until the 1970s had a middle-class base. Government-sponsored suburbanization and private sector deindustrializtion left us with the "hood" of the 1980s. Baseball became a suburban sport, which is why many of the black MLB players are from the middle classes. (U.S. News provides an excellent breakdown of this social process.)

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Resist/Recharge: How We Can Empower Young Artists of Color With Red Eagle Soaring and Totem Star

Our first Resist/Recharge event with SOMOS.
Our first Resist/Recharge event with SOMOS.

Free Tuesday evening? Swing by St. John's Bar and Eatery on Capitol Hill for the fifth installment of Resist/Recharge, The Stranger's series of talks with community leaders and nonprofits opposed to President Trump's agenda. We've chatted with SOMOS, Northwest Harvest, Greenpeace, 21 Progress and Langston.

This week, we're hosting not one, but two great organizations. Both are focused on developing young artists of color. Red Eagle Soaring develops native youth through performing arts. Totem Star, a full-fledge recording studio, works with kids on producing music.

Together, we'll talk about how Seattle can best empower young artists of color in the age of Trump. Guest speakers will include Red Eagle Soaring Native Youth Theatre and Daniel Pak of Totem Star. I'll be moderating.

Don't miss it.


Seattle Food News: Local 360's New Chef, La Panadería Sticks Around, Jon Rowley Needs Your Help, and More!

Not exactly a local classic, but certainly made with as many local ingredients as possible. Local 360s shrimp and grits.
Not exactly a local classic, but certainly made with as many local ingredients as possible. Local 360's shrimp and grits. Local 360

Local 360 Has a New Chef

Local 360 has a new chef: Scott Emerick, most recently of Restaurant Nora in the other Washington. Restaurant Nora was the nation's first certified organic restaurant, so he fits right in at Local 360, whose mission is to use as many organic ingredients as possible and to source as many of those as possible from within 360 miles.

He plans to put his mark on the restaurant with his food, of course, but also by making his own salt and starting a root cellar to see them through the winter, according their press release. Speaking of his food, he's planning to add some ember-roasted eggplant with wild mushrooms and cherry tomatoes, as well as a pappardelle with Carlton Farms pork ragu. Sounds tasty.

I stopped in Friday to see how things are going so far, and while I didn't have any of his new signature dishes, the kitchen is definitely doing God's work under his tutelage. When it's well-executed, Local 360's unfussy take on contemporary Northwest comfort food is hard to beat. They aren't trying to outfox anyone with esoteric dishes you have to Google to appreciate, they're just trying to make the best damn beef tartare you've had in awhile.

Beyond the perfectly classic beef tartare, the treviso salad we had was dressed in some sort of wonderfully zingy, slightly creamy dressing, and our bison steak frites was about as spot on as it possibly could be. I didn't understand why the excellent deviled eggs we started with needed a little log of crab leg on top, other than to justify the $11 price tag for three, but I'm not one to turn my nose up at any deviled egg. And crab is kind of like the bacon of the sea—it's not always necessary, but never unwelcome.

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County Executive Dow Constantine, Transit Advocacy Group Endorse Jenny Durkan

King County Executive Dow Constantine.
King County Executive Dow Constantine. David Ryder/Getty

Dow Constantine is backing Jenny Durkan in the race for Seattle mayor:

"We share a belief in the power of partnerships to get tough things done, which is why she will be critical to addressing our regional challenges—from tackling homelessness to speeding up light rail to West Seattle and Ballard," Constantine said in a statement. "In this election, the candidates share the same core beliefs. The distinctions are about who is best prepared to run a major enterprise and to drive real progress. Jenny Durkan has the passion and commitment of an activist, but also the leadership skills and savvy to get the job done."

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NewsCrime

Police Reports Illustrated: Man Tries to Improve Free Throws, Plays Like Garbage

Callan Berry
Callan Berry

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