If You’re New to Seattle, Here’s What You Need

The Young Turks Come to Washington State on a Quest to Overturn Citizens United

Break out your powdered wigs, baby! Its time to talk about the viability of constitutional conventions!
Break out your powdered wigs, baby! It's time to talk about the viability of constitutional conventions! William Thomas Cain / GETTY

On Friday afternoon, the Washington State Senate committee will hear a bill often dismissed as a potentially disastrous pipe dream. The resolution would ask Congress to convene a "limited" constitutional convention for the purposes of "proposing a free and fair elections amendment," which would effectively overturn Citizens United and end the corrupting influence of money in politics. State Senator Patty Kuderer, who introduced the bill, says she expects the resolution "to receive serious consideration by the committee," arguing that "we can’t go it alone in fixing our elections."

Cenk Uygur, host of the online news show The Young Turks, will travel to Olympia to testify in support of the bill. Over the phone, he claimed a hundred local volunteers from Wolf PAC, a political organization he founded to push for a convention, will join him in the chamber.

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German Guitar God Michael Rother Discusses Working with Eno, a Blown Bowie Collab, and His Alleged Disdain for Bass

It’s possible that somebody in [Bowies camp] decided just to make sure that no crazy German experimentalist would interfere with the pop artist David Bowie.
"It’s possible that somebody in [Bowie's camp] decided just to make sure that no crazy German experimentalist would interfere with the pop artist David Bowie." MAX ZERRAHN

In the third and final edition of The Stranger's interview with Michael Rother, he discusses a missed opportunity with David Bowie, collaborating with Brian Eno, the rumor about his aversion to bass frequencies, his music's alleged New Age qualities, the bureaucratic nightmare of booking a US tour, and more. You can read part 1 here and part 2 here.

The Stranger: One thing I don’t think people acknowledge enough about your music is its soulfulness, the deep emotional aspect to your music. It seems like people are wowed by your tone and the rhythms, the hypnotic nature, but I think there’s a real soulfulness to your solo records, among some of your other music.
That sounds very nice. I would buy that. [laughs]

What emotions are you trying to convey in your solo albums, if you could pinpoint?
It’s not the result really of being determined to convey certain emotions, it’s just what happens when you make music. And, of course what happens, what goes on in your life at a certain time, has some effect on the results, and so good things and less nice things, sad things; they all affect your feelings, and so when I go into the studio I start making music, I don’t purposefully try to express dark moods or happy feelings; it just happens.

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An Opera About the Last Hero of Capitalism

It’s one act, and the brilliant but complicated Apple CEO is in every scene.
It’s one act, and the brilliant but complicated Apple CEO is in every scene. KEN HOWARD

We will get to Steve Jobs in a moment. First we must discuss Joseph Schumpeter.


During the middle of the Second World War, Schumpeter, a great Austrian-born economist who for a period taught at Harvard, argued that the hero of capitalism, the entrepreneur, was doomed. He saw the only business figure worthy of myth-making being displaced (if not devoured) by managers, boardrooms, and shareholders. Weirdly, he saw this as part of the rise of socialism. The hero of capitalism would be smothered by the machine of corporate governance.


Of course, he was wrong. The myth of the heroic entrepreneur has persisted. It is today represented by figures like Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos. But in our era, no other entrepreneur captured the public's imagination more than the late Steve Jobs. He started Apple with a friend in his parents' garage. Later, he was thrown out of the corporation. Later still, he returned to Apple and, after making it one of the greatest corporations of our times, died at the relatively young age of 56.

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Last-Minute Plans: 98 Free, Cheap & Easy Things To Do in Seattle This Weekend: Feb 22-24, 2019

Check out more than 300 works on paper for sale (on Friday) and revisit Anthony Whites curated show (on Friday and Saturday) at While Supplies Last and Ultra Light Beams.
Check out more than 300 works on paper for sale (on Friday) and revisit Anthony White's curated show (on Friday and Saturday) at While Supplies Last and Ultra Light Beams.

Panicking because you don’t know what to do this weekend and you're short on cash? Don't worry—below, find all of your options for last-minute entertainment that won't cost more than $10, ranging from Love in the Market, and from Vaginomicon to Mama's Thirsty: A Queer Valentine's Day Afterparty. For even more options, check out our complete Things To Do calendar, our list of cheap & easy things to do in Seattle all year long, and our roundup of places to watch the 2019 Academy Awards ceremony.

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.

FRIDAY

COMMUNITY
1. People's Town Hall for a Green New Deal
Here's your chance to talk about the details of the AOC-backed Green New Deal—a set of proposed programs that aim to address climate change and economic inequality—at a town hall led by youth activist group Sunrise Movement. Senators Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray will be in attendance.
(Downtown, free)

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How to Make Friends in Seattle

It’s difficult to strike up a conversation with people who are doing this (which everyone in Seattle is at all times).
It’s difficult to strike up a conversation with people who are doing this (which everyone in Seattle is at all times). SKYNESHER/GETTY IMAGES

People say Seattle is an unfriendly city, but that's not quite true: It's actually a cold, gloomy, cliquish, cultish, and unfriendly city. As you will soon find out, it's also not an easy place to make friends. This is especially true if you don't believe in astrology, which wide swaths of Seattle are as devoted to as nuns are to God.

I learned this the hard way, and more than once. When I first moved here five years ago (it feels more like 50), I went out with a potential new friend who immediately asked for my astrological sign. "Wait!" she said. "Let me guess." She got it right on the twelfth try. Right around then, I remembered that I had a late-night dentist appointment and left. And that was one of my more successful friend dates.

I never had trouble meeting people before Seattle. At first, I did the thing you are supposed to do to meet people: I joined a running club. Just kidding! Why would anyone do that? I actually went to bars and tried talking to people. This technique had been successful in other cities—but in Seattle, I found that most people were less interested in strangers than in their iPhones.

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Ten Unique Seattle Margaritas To Try For National Margarita Day

Not your dads Margaritaville: The new spicy margarita at Pablo y Pablo is made with house-infused jalapeño tequila and garnished with a pepper.
Not your dad's Margaritaville: The new spicy margarita at Pablo y Pablo is made with house-infused jalapeño tequila and garnished with a pepper. Pablo y Pablo / Instagram

Though the weather may not seem particularly hospitable to frosty-drink-guzzling, today is National Margarita Day, as good of an excuse as any to partake in some salty, limey elixirs with a side of tacos. However, that doesn't mean you need to settle for any old marg. Below, we've gathered a compilation of tequila-laced libations that venture beyond the usual blend—from spicy ones to avocado-based ones to pineapple-infused ones. For more ideas, check out our recommended Mexican restaurants or our food & drink calendar.

Barrio
The Northwest-inspired Mexican kitchen and bar's blood orange margarita is carbonated and consists of reposado tequila, cane syrup, lime, and blood orange.

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Life Is Not All That: Human-Made DNA Works Just as Well as Natural DNA

Gattaca
Gattaca Columbia Pictures

There is a major difference between the 1997 movie Gattaca and its original script. The former doesn't explain the exact goal of the space mission to Saturn's moon Titan, but the latter does. It is to find the origins of life. What screenwriter Andrew Niccol (also the director) had in mind was to connect the space mission (old tech) with what at the time, mid-'90s, was all the rage—the human genome, the sequencing of which (new tech) began in 1990 and was declared completed in 2003. The feeling at the time was that the answers of life would finally be exposed. There would be no more mysteries. Your DNA was you and your fate. This was the new mechanism. A Newtonism in space and your body. The name of the film, Gattaca, is, of course, based on four chemicals that many imagined life came down to: guanine, cytosine, adenine and thymine (G, C, A, and T).

It turns out that cutting the connection between life and space travel from the final film was right. Life is not just about the DNA molecule (the materials of which Niccol imagined came to earth from somewhere in space—panspermia); and the private and government projects to sequence the human genome did not expose life as it is but instead, took pictures of a part of it. It also turns out that the environment matters, and there is a hyper-genome that involves viral and bacterial players, including those that are specific to humans. Life is a complex process, not a hard thing (your DNA). There is more. Scientists have recently made synthetic DNA that can function with natural DNA. And so the old fixed sequence of G, C, A, and T can be doubled to form a DNA molecule. What this means is there is nothing really special (or "magic") about the "four chemicals that evolved on Earth."

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16 Places To Watch the 2019 Academy Award Ceremony in Seattle

Get gussied up for a red carpet Oscar viewing experience at Rhein Haus.
Get gussied up for a red carpet Oscar viewing experience at Rhein Haus. Rhein Haus via Facebook

The 91st Academy Awards are this Sunday, February 24 at 5 p.m. PST. If you're looking for a place to watch the show beyond the comfort of your couch—after you've caught up on the Oscar-nominated films still playing in Seattle—we've got you covered, whether you want your own red-carpet experience (like at Rhein Haus) or you want to watch the show on the big screen (like at Central Cinema). Find them all below and on our Academy Awards calendar.

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.

BALLARD
Bad Jimmy's
No offense to the hard-working actors and filmmakers whose work is honored at the Oscars, but televised award shows are boring. To spice things up, this watch party will include trivia, games, ballot prizes, and lots of champagne.

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Food We Can't Live Without

The classic ramen at Ramen Danbo. You should order the thick noodles.
The classic ramen at Ramen Danbo. You should order the thick noodles. JESSICA STEIN

Here are some of the dishes that Stranger staffers find themselves eating constantly at Seattle restaurants.



Sun-dried tomato and basil slice at Hot Mama's Pizza


Don't order a pie—you just want to go in and get a slice. Ask the counter person to toss it back in the oven just long enough to toast the bottom. It's the best slice in Seattle. DAN SAVAGE



Tzatziki at Omega


I don't know what kind of yogurt they use at Omega to make their tzatziki, but it is the thickest and creamiest I've ever had. A generous serving of diced cucumber elevates the whole affair, and it's all accompanied by the best pita in town. Order a glass of ouzo with a bucket of ice, and suddenly all the reasons to live are sitting right there on the table in front of you. RICH SMITH


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Buy Your Tickets to These 30 Newly Announced Seattle Events Before They Sell Out

Popular potty-mouthed comedienne Chelsea Handler will make a June stop in Seattle on her Life Will Be the Death of Me book tour.
Popular potty-mouthed comedienne Chelsea Handler will make a June stop in Seattle on her Life Will Be the Death of Me book tour.

We all know that many of the biggest Seattle events often sell out well in advance. But it's not a lost cause—if you plan ahead, you can still score tickets for the most popular events. To help you with that, we've rounded up all of the major events that are going on sale in the next couple of days, like the Watershed Festival and Dave Matthews Band, plus things that have just gone on sale, like School of Rock. Can't get tickets? Check out our complete Things To Do calendar for more events.

Note: Tickets on sale at 10 a.m. unless otherwise specified

ON SALE FRIDAY
COMEDY
Chelsea Handler: Life Will Be the Death of Me
Fri June 1 at Moore Theatre

MUSIC
Betty Who
May 10-11 at Neptune Theatre
New show added for May 11; May 10 tickets already on sale

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Slog AM: Seattle Squeeze 2.0, A Lot of Potholes, Mueller Probe Is Wrapping Up

Pothole patrol cant really start until the weather warms up!
Pothole patrol can't really start until the weather warms up! kozmoat98/Getty Images

Police arrest 22 men in child-sex crime sting: The police catfished 22 men into thinking they were talking to young children. One account even posed to be as young as 6. These kinds of operations are growing more common and State Patrol says they’ve arrested almost 250 people in sting operations like this one since August 2015. These men all came from Thurston County.

Noticed a hell of a lot more potholes? You’re not alone. Seattle’s Department of Transportation has been receiving work orders to fill holes and cracks in the asphalt at a rate of over 1,000 percent higher than normal thanks to the snowstorm. But it’s too cold to use the gold standard hot mix asphalt, so they have to use a temporary cold mix. So go slow people, or you might just end up at an auto shop with all of Seattle’s other unlucky drivers.

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Slog PM: Dubious DNA Usage in China, Snow in Los Angeles, Dead Cows in Washington

Cannot promise this beef was never frozen.
Cannot promise this beef was never frozen. jotily/Getty Images

Former Sen. Joe Fain had some heavy-hitting support in getting new gig: Fain served for two terms as a Washington state senator. He lost his election bid this November amidst rape allegations against him. He was recently hired as the CEO of the Bellevue Chamber of Commerce. Two of the people who were contacted as references on his behalf? Former Washington state governor Christine Gregoire and Ana Mari Cauce, the current president of the University of Washington.

New climate super PAC vows to support Gov. Inslee's inevitable presidential run: Act Now on Climate was formed on Thursday. Its leader, Corey Platt, a former political director for the Democratic Governors Association that was chaired by Inslee last year, said that climate change is the most pressing issue for the next president. Act Now on Climate can raise and spend as much money as it wants. Inslee is the super PAC's first choice.

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Seattle, Where Are Your Favorite Places to Eat and Drink? VOTE NOW!

2019-F_D-survey_with-header.jpg

For the 2019 edition of The Stranger’s Food & Drink guide, we’re Dining Around the Clock, offering a breakdown of our favorite Seattle-roasted coffee makers, where to get breakfast and brunch, lunch, dinner (including the best places to bring a date, your family, or an out-of-town guest), and late night options, as well as some of our favorite happy hours and locally-brewed beers.

This year, we want to hear from you, our readers, about your favorites, too. We’ll be running a survey over the next three weeks, where you can vote on your favorite Seattle spots. We’ll include the winners of each category in the 2019 Food & Drink issue, which hits the streets on March 27.

Tell us what you love, Seattle—take the survey here. You have until midnight on Tue., Feb. 26.


31 Movies Worth Watching in Seattle This Weekend: Feb 21-24, 2019

The intense drama Burning by Chang-dong Lee racked up 30 film festival and critics awards and 104 nominations.
The intense drama Burning by Chang-dong Lee racked up 30 film festival and critics' awards and 104 nominations and is playing at SIFF Egyptian this weekend only.

If you love movies, you've got a busy weekend ahead! You can catch up on Oscar-nominated films, and, of course, watch the ceremony itself. But there's plenty more going on, like the Seattle Asian American Film Festival, the universally praised drama Burning , and a run of the gloriously silly Singin' in the Rain. Follow the links below to see complete showtimes, tickets, and trailers for all of our critics' picks, and, if you're looking for even more options, check out our film events calendar and complete movie times listings.

Stay in the know! Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app (available for iOS and Android), or delivered to your inbox.

Note: Movies play Thursday–Sunday unless otherwise noted.

2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films: Animated, Live Action and Documentary
In this year's crop of animated short film nominees, meet characters like animals in therapy, a sweet little bao dumpling come to life, a Chinese American girl who wants to be an astronaut, and other charming folks. In the live action films, an aging woman bonds with her nurse; two young boys are interrogated over the death of a toddler; a mother receives a call from her young son, whose father has apparently abandoned him while on vacation; and more in these tense and touching films. The documentary subjects include a Zen hospice, Nigerian immigrants facing racism in England, refugees rescued from the Mediterranean, Indian women fighting menstruation stigma, and 20,000 American Nazis in 1939.
SIFF Cinema Uptown (live action & animation only) & AMC Seattle 10

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What Are Seattle's Budtenders Smoking? Nolan Byng Loves Diamonds N' Sauce.

Nolan loves his dabs.
Nolan loves his dabs. Lester Black

Welcome to a new regular installment on Slog where we ask the most pressing question on everyone's minds: what are Seattle’s budtenders smoking?

Nolan Byng has been helping people find the right pot for their pipes since 2010 when Washington was still selling weed under the old medical system. He said he got involved in the industry after he left the Navy.

"From high school, I went into the Navy at 17 and then I broke my back in four places and had to get out. I got my medical card the next day and then got involved in the industry by chance," Byng told me.

Now he works at The Bakerée, a pot shop in Georgetown that looks like an unassuming budget motel from the outside. The shop's interior is far more inspiring, with the exposed wood beams, white walls, and an art gallery that takes up nearly half of the shop. On a recent visit, paintings made out of skateboards by local artist Jason Singler were hanging.

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